#1
Hello all!

Seeing some of the learning tools out there, like Fretlight, Rocksmith, GuitarPro, etc. I'm looking for suggestions...

I've been playing guitar for over 10 years now, but have very little formal training. Prior to picking up guitar, I had many years of formal violin training... however my guitar learning has been through playing with tabs or a few short lived periods with an instructor.

I can pick up most songs fairly quickly by ear at this point, but am more interested in creating more of my own music. I have basic chords and scales under my belt...along with good technique and a good ear.... having more knowledge would definitely benefit my creation process.

Also might be worth noting that I'm mostly into rock... Alice in Chains / Tool / Perfect Circle type stuff... I'd equate the things I come up with most have a Perfect Circle type vibe to them.

Anyone have suggestions for a learning aid geared toward an intermediate guitarist?
I know it's better to be well rounded... but considering the stuff I'm into, am I over-complicating things? Would mastering a few of the right scales / progressions do the trick?

If an learning aid is the way to go... From the list above, it seems like GuitarPro might be the best option out of those, but I may just be scratching the surface of the options out there. Definitely open to suggestions and any feedback.

Thanks everyone!!
Last edited by NickyTyler at Dec 27, 2014,
#3
I don't think GuitarPro will help you too much ... I believe it's more useful as tool that's great for creating tab.

A knowledge of theory should help you creatively and for understanding others music.

From what I've seen of http://www.justinguitar.com/, there's a lot of good content there to help you get theory.

cheers, Jerry
#4
I think analyzing your favorite songs may help. That way you'll understand what kind of sections the song has and how they connect the sections (I think that's the hardest part when you write full songs). You also understand about arrangement (what the different instruments play). What kind of chords do they use? What about rhythm?

But yeah, first you need to come up with an idea. You could start with anything - melody, lyrics, chords, drum beat, guitar riff, bassline, rhythm. Try different things.

For example if you like the chord progression or rhythm used in a song, write a song based on the same chords or rhythm. There are so many songs that use exactly the same chords and rhythms that this is not ripping off. So don't be afraid of it. You could also intentionally just rip off other songs - this song doesn't need to be published anywhere. You could just try what you can come up with. I think this is a good mentality - you don't always need to write songs to be published. You don't always need to write masterpieces. Just write something and see what it turns out to be. If it sounds too much like something else, it doesn't matter. Just don't publish it and it's OK.

As I said, I think the hardest part in songwriting is connecting your ideas. I have many ideas but I haven't written many full songs. So pay attention to how other bands make it work.

But yeah, something like Guitar Pro could help. It's good to be able to write your ideas down and play them back. Also, get a recording software. Songs can sound pretty different when played with real instruments vs when played by Guitar Pro (because you may not be able to replicate your playing on Guitar Pro). I have Cubase LE4 that came with my Digitech RP355.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Dec 27, 2014,
#5
Quote by NickyTyler
Hello all!

Seeing some of the learning tools out there, like Fretlight, Rocksmith, GuitarPro, etc. I'm looking for suggestions...

I've been playing guitar for over 10 years now, but have very little formal training. Prior to picking up guitar, I had many years of formal violin training... however my guitar learning has been through playing with tabs or a few short lived periods with an instructor.

I can pick up most songs fairly quickly by ear at this point, but am more interested in creating more of my own music. I have basic chords and scales under my belt...along with good technique and a good ear.... having more knowledge would definitely benefit my creation process.

Also might be worth noting that I'm mostly into rock... Alice in Chains / Tool / Perfect Circle type stuff... I'd equate the things I come up with most have a Perfect Circle type vibe to them.

Anyone have suggestions for a learning aid geared toward an intermediate guitarist?
I know it's better to be well rounded... but considering the stuff I'm into, am I over-complicating things? Would mastering a few of the right scales / progressions do the trick?

If an learning aid is the way to go... From the list above, it seems like GuitarPro might be the best option out of those, but I may just be scratching the surface of the options out there. Definitely open to suggestions and any feedback.

Thanks everyone!!


the best learning aid = a teacher
shred is gaudy music
#7
Guitar Pro can be helpful when writing and arranging songs since you can get a rough idea of what it all sound like together. It makes it easy to just change a few notes here and there and then listen to it and see what it sounds like with any other instruments you've put in. Of course, it won't sound like the real instruments, but I find it to be pretty helpful.
#9
People have told me to find other people but it isn't that easy these days, I think a really important way to progress is as others have pointed out is to set yourself musical goals, both short term and long term. Things like creating a top 20 of guitar songs and categorizing them into levels of attainment/difficulty. Easy Beatles and Stones all the way up to songs with sweep picking solos in them. Just an idea really but you have to set musical goals otherwise you can spend decades wandering around like a lost Arab.
#10
In my experience, Guitar Pro is worth every penny and more to guitarists who are starting to write their own material.
#11
Quote by Vlasco
In my experience, Guitar Pro is worth every penny and more to guitarists who are starting to write their own material.


Don't get me wrong ... it is a wonderful tool, and I happily parted with my cash for it. For writing, yes, it does an excellent job. But Guitar Pro (company) don't promote it for self-teaching of theory. That wasn't it's intended purpose.

cheers, Jerry
#12
I agree, but it sounds like he's at a stage where a little self discovery with his knowledge of basic chords and scales would be very useful alongside the typical youtube video series. It helps to test the ideas more systematically and to organise thoughts.