#1
Hi, I just bought this 1960s Danelectro and the bridge is more "off" than I anticipated . Photos here:





Can it be fixed by most luthiers without crazy rebuilding costs?? It plays well but the intonation is a bit off and the action, though playable, is a bit weird.

Thanks in advance for your advice!
#2
Ouch... Wish I had an answer for you.

Personally, that looks sweet. Just be careful. Sometimes, albeit probably not in this case, problems and patinas are actually a good thing to keep as far as the value of a guitar... though again I have no clue with guitars like this.
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#3
They probably have to plug the old holes, refin that part of the guitar and drill new holes. Most likely won't be the cheapest repair but at least the guitar is black. It'll be much easier to hide the work done.
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#4
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
They probably have to plug the old holes, refin that part of the guitar and drill new holes. Most likely won't be the cheapest repair but at least the guitar is black. It'll be much easier to hide the work done.
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#5
My main worry is getting the nails back in the right place. The middle hole now is rather messed up. The bridge has a whammy bar so that might have caused the damage initially.

Do you think a luthier would be able to redo the holes/fix the bridge for less than $60? In theory I could do it myself but I don't trust my skills.
#6
Nope. Doubt youll find somebody that cheap but who knows.
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My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


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I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
Last edited by H4T3BR33D3R at Dec 29, 2014,
#8
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I'd route it and replace with a solid piece of wood, refinish, and re-install the bridge.



Pretty sure that's what the luthier would do too. (if he was any decent.)
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My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


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I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#9
Yeah... that body is hollow Masonite (same stuff they use to make clipboards). I hate that trem design. I had a Hornet that had that. Less of an issue there because they made the body out of wood at least. Typical dano bridge is held down by that single big screw in the back of the bridge and held up (height adjustment) by a screw on either side that sits UNDER each side of the bridge and acts as a fulcrum or pivot point. With the tremolo version of that bridge, the back screw is driven into a bracket/spring assembly rather than fixed into a solid block of wood. If the material above the spring and below the bridge has buckled as your photos show, it's not going to be cheap to clean up and refin the damage and depending on how the inside looks, I wonder if it'll be structurally sound. Under string tension, I suspect that thing is going to eventually buckle more of the top and tear itself out.

It can be fixed but I don't think it's going to be financially acceptable so unless the thing is a family heirloom or has a lot of sentimental value, I wouldn't look to repair it if I was in that situation. If you decide to fix it, there should be a single very small screw on the underside of the bridge that holds that rosewood saddle in place. if you check intonation, then loosen that a little, you can move either end forward/back (or the whole thing to a lesser degree). Good luck.
#10
Hydra - that's bad news! Well I'd really like to fix it as I only just bought it, and I'd lose $150 in shipping costs if I send it back. The seller should have made it clear the bridge was this messed up, of course he didn't take any close-ups photos of the bridge or mention the intonation issues.

I use fairly light gauge strings (10-46) usually, hopefully that would make it easier on the guitar. Playing it now I don't think spring tension had much to do with the buckling, it looks like the whammy bar got hit hard (during shipping?) and the bridge got shoved forwards.





Considering the circumstances, do you really think it's not worth refilling/redrilling the holes? One alternative would be to change the bridge, but then the guitar won't be original and I probably won't be able to use the same whammy bar. I bought the guitar for the whammy as I already have the Jimmy Page 3021...
Last edited by Farrella at Dec 30, 2014,
#11
Get quotes locally and find out if it's worth it for you. Multiple people said it's probably not worth it.


Just goes to show that you gotta be a bit more vigilant on your guitar purchases. Make sure you get super detailed pics of everything and make sure you ask the seller everything about the guitar. Don't let the culpability fall on you.
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


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I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#12
I've heard of people "upgrading" the stock Danelectro bridges of their 3021s, and Jimmy Page famously replaced the original bridge of his Danelectro....so people do muck around with these bridges it seems.