#1
Hi,
So say we're in the key of C Major, a minor 2nd would be the C sharp note? So it is a C Major scale with a flatten 2nd? Appreciate Any more info about how to use it in songs etc..
Thanks!
Last edited by Guitar137335 at Dec 29, 2014,
#2
Yep, a minor 2nd from the tonic is C# or Db, depending on the context. It's often used in minor keys as an N6 member.
#4
Quote by Guitar137335
Thanks! But what does N6 mean


Neapolitan chord: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neapolitan_chord
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#5
Quote by Guitar137335
Hi,
So say we're in the key of C Major, a minor 2nd would be the C sharp note? So it is a C Major scale with a flatten 2nd? Appreciate Any more info about how to use it in songs etc..
Thanks!


A minor 2nd in its own right is an interval of 1 semitone ... two pitches a semitone apart ... so that crops up it most scales.

In chords, it usually crops up an octave higher, as a b9, in altered dominant chords (e.g 7b9), and is a tension note that wants to resolve to the 5th of the ensuing I chord.

So, in progression G7b9 C, the b9 (Ab) will resolve to G (a semitone lower) of the C chord (which is its 5th).

Also, you can borrow the bII chord from e.g Phrygian (so for example in C Phryg, the Db maj(7) or maj7b5, and stick that into another progression based of C (say off C major or C Aeolian). The idea is to look for a scale that has a b2, check out that scale's chord type built off b2, root the scale of the say key note as the main scale, so the b2 falls a semitone higher and use that. This is a general concept for filling in "all the gaps" left by the scale primarily being used for the chords and melody.

e.g Cm Db maj7 Bb Ab, Cm Db Ab Bb. (mainly C Aeolian chords)

or C6add9 Db6add9 F/D G7#5 (I, bII (borrowed), ii, V (but altered)

But it's also used as a b2 purely chromatically. So for example, in A m pentatonic, you could play a line that includes sliding up from A (1) to Bb and back for a little extra colour.

b2 (or b9) is usually avoided in minor chord types (to rare to hear m7b9) and pretty much never crops up in maj chord types (as opposed to dominant chord types).

cheers, Jerry
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Dec 29, 2014,