#1
Is there an easy/cheap way to modify a microphone signal so that it can be put through guitar effect pedals, namely distortion and phase shifting pedals (even more specifically, a MXR Phase 90 and Super Overdrive on low gain)?
Custom-Built Strat
Epiphone Les Paul Custom Pro
Orange Rockerverb 50 Combo
#3
Pretty much all you need to do is get an adaptor for the mic's plug to fit the pedal's input, then go from the pedal's output to an amp or whatever.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#4
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Pretty much all you need to do is get an adaptor for the mic's plug to fit the pedal's input, then go from the pedal's output to an amp or whatever.
I read something about a difference in <insert sound lingo here> that makes the reduction in sound quality extreme when using mics with guitar pedals...
Custom-Built Strat
Epiphone Les Paul Custom Pro
Orange Rockerverb 50 Combo
#5
Could be.

Personally, I have an old Teac that doesn't even need an adapter, and it goes into an old Korg Px4, then to a tiny desktop Orange. But clearly, I'm not doing this for recording or concerts- I'm just jacking around.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#6
This stuff isn't rocket science. And it certainly isn't a new concept (thinks of every noise, surf, and garage-rock band I've ever seen)

mic -> pedal -> amp / PA / Mixer / etc.

Depending on the type of mic and mic cable you have you may have to buy an adapter, super standard. They're like 4 bucks or something.

On the other hand, your concern about sound quality is troubling to me. The desire to color the vocal signal, with a phaser and superdrive at that, AND maintain vocal clarity do not coexist in my mind.

Their are vocal processors out their that do this and have effects specially designed for vocal input. Further, their are mixers that have on board effects and gain controls (Alesis makes great entry level ones that work fine). At the end of the day though, the cheapest thing to do is use the distortion pedal you already have. Further, just try it...it wont break. CHEERS
#7
Quote by BUZZARD__
This stuff isn't rocket science. And it certainly isn't a new concept (thinks of every noise, surf, and garage-rock band I've ever seen)

mic -> pedal -> amp / PA / Mixer / etc.

Depending on the type of mic and mic cable you have you may have to buy an adapter, super standard. They're like 4 bucks or something.

On the other hand, your concern about sound quality is troubling to me. The desire to color the vocal signal, with a phaser and superdrive at that, AND maintain vocal clarity do not coexist in my mind.

Their are vocal processors out their that do this and have effects specially designed for vocal input. Further, their are mixers that have on board effects and gain controls (Alesis makes great entry level ones that work fine). At the end of the day though, the cheapest thing to do is use the distortion pedal you already have. Further, just try it...it wont break. CHEERS
I have a Phase 90 pedal shipping to me now. Hopefully it will do what I want with vocals, but it will at least be a nice toy to add to my collection for my guitar.
When I say delayed, overdriven yet clear, I mean something like this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q6St8bsR2Go
Custom-Built Strat
Epiphone Les Paul Custom Pro
Orange Rockerverb 50 Combo