#1
A friend just posted an article he wrote on the evils of music piracy. I personally don't see what the fuss is all about. About a year or more ago I would have attacked piracy just like him, but know I dont feel the same. The music industry has changed. Look up the benefits of free music and you'll find plenty of articles supporting the idea. unless im wrong an artist has never made great money off mp3 sells. the best way to make money is touring, merchandise, Vinyls, etc. I'm not saying to never buy music but i dont think Music Piracy is killing any good bands. If your music is good and you got a good fan base you will sell concert tickets. i know this isnt a super in depth. just sharing some thoughts. what do you all think?
Last edited by brenton.white.5 at Dec 31, 2014,
#2
To quote crunk, music as a commodity is not worth paying for.
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#3
It's like smoking pot in the 70's. Maybe it's "wrong" but come ooooon, everybody's doing it.
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#4
check out my mixtape fam
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#5
That attitude seems to be kinda like a 'stick it to the man' type thing, but the ones getting hurt are the musicians, not some huge record company that just has to pump out another Beiber to make money.

Also, the idea that you can make a living selling concert tickets, vinyl, and merch is a little misguided. You'll make money, but expect to make less than an entry-level school teacher at best. It's not easy. Tours are expensive and exhausting. Most low-mid level acts are lucky to break even. Most end up in the hole.

The industry needs to change. Maybe downloading music is a good way to influence that, but at this point it's putting more musicians on the street or working at CVS than propagating changes. They could have written your next favorite song or put on the show that you'll tell your kids about, but they won't get that chance. To me? That's kinda sad.

It's not your fault. The industry has had time to adapt and has proven that it's a dinosaur with some kind of strange anti-evolutionary complex, but that doesn't change that the artist pulls in far less profit when you and 250,000 other people can't spare $10 on an album.
#6
Besides some pirating I did as a young lad for some hard-to-find items, I buy everything because I like to own things. I like to have records and CDs and DVDs and blue rays and I like that as long as I maintain and take care of my things I will always have them. It's a tangibility issue for me. I don't abide by the "digital-life-is-all-powerful" religion so many people worship (referencing mp3 culture).

It’s ironic to me really. Someone who will pour thousands of dollars into owning music equipment and will praise tube amps over solid state and appreciate hand wired analog fx pedals over digital emulation will often be THE SAME PERSON who thinks spending $12-15 bucks on a record from a band they like is out of line and prefers to have an mp3 instead.
Point blank – you’re rationalizing theft because you believe you’re entitled to music. You are entitled to listen to it, but possessing it is another question.

Also, playing music doesn’t make as much money as you think. The fact that so many of you believe this really illuminates your position within the music scene. I could be off-base here, and I don’t intend to be demeaning, but I am trying to relate that IF you have ever played in a band and cut a record…you would know how important and meaningful it is to see someone buy your cd.
#7
Quote by mjones1992
That attitude seems to be kinda like a 'stick it to the man' type thing, but the ones getting hurt are the musicians, not some huge record company that just has to pump out another Beiber to make money.

Also, the idea that you can make a living selling concert tickets, vinyl, and merch is a little misguided. You'll make money, but expect to make less than an entry-level school teacher at best. It's not easy. Tours are expensive and exhausting. Most low-mid level acts are lucky to break even. Most end up in the hole.

The industry needs to change. Maybe downloading music is a good way to influence that, but at this point it's putting more musicians on the street or working at CVS than propagating changes. They could have written your next favorite song or put on the show that you'll tell your kids about, but they won't get that chance. To me? That's kinda sad.

It's not your fault. The industry has had time to adapt and has proven that it's a dinosaur with some kind of strange anti-evolutionary complex, but that doesn't change that the artist pulls in far less profit when you and 250,000 other people can't spare $10 on an album.

protip: musicians hurt with or without piracy. keep em poor and desperate so they write better music
#8
Quote by BUZZARD__
Besides some pirating I did as a young lad for some hard-to-find items, I buy everything because I like to own things. I like to have records and CDs and DVDs and blue rays and I like that as long as I maintain and take care of my things I will always have them. It's a tangibility issue for me. I don't abide by the "digital-life-is-all-powerful" religion so many people worship (referencing mp3 culture).

It’s ironic to me really. Someone who will pour thousands of dollars into owning music equipment and will praise tube amps over solid state and appreciate hand wired analog fx pedals over digital emulation will often be THE SAME PERSON who thinks spending $12-15 bucks on a record from a band they like is out of line and prefers to have an mp3 instead.
Point blank – you’re rationalizing theft because you believe you’re entitled to music. You are entitled to listen to it, but possessing it is another question.

Also, playing music doesn’t make as much money as you think. The fact that so many of you believe this really illuminates your position within the music scene. I could be off-base here, and I don’t intend to be demeaning, but I am trying to relate that IF you have ever played in a band and cut a record…you would know how important and meaningful it is to see someone buy your cd.


Eh- I dont argue that a lot of people rationalize the theft aspect of it. I still believe illegally downloading music is theft (in a way). I rarely do it anymore, but I also hardly ever buy music either. But in terms of software and music that you download, I will never see that form of stealing to be the same as going into a store and stealing a bunch of CDs. As you said, the CDs are physical and each costs money to make; but the mp3s can be copied infinite amount of times for free (or nearly free, if you consider owning a computer / electricity bill; negligible if you ask me).

I cant argue with your desire to own a "physical thing". Thats your perogative, and it sounds like a good one to me. BUT, i dont think people wanting to own tube amps and high end equipment for playing/recording music has anything to do with peoples disinterest in paying for music. When I record, I want to be able to produce and capture the tone i hear in my head in as high quality as possible. And unfortunately, that tends to require a lot of money. But if i can find a free vst to do it, I will.

Listening experience Audiophiles are a different story though- they will pay for a hi-fi record player and for the vinyls. I wont. But I still want high end boutique tube amps because theyre awesome for my hobby playing/recording my music; not listening to others'
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Last edited by Watterboy at Dec 31, 2014,
#9
I think music is moving more and more towards being free (or low subscription fee), and I only see how that will benefit musicians and fans in the long run. The people it doesn't benefit are the giant record companies. I don't really give a shit about those giant corrupt money churners anyway, though.
#10
I haven't pirated music for years. Most smaller/solo bands I listen to let you stream their music for free. And then there's spotify so I can listen to practically anything I want for free but legally.
#11
Honestly, now that I can afford to buy music on regular basis, I don't pirate much. I mostly pirated when I didn't have money for the music I wanted.

Honestly, that sounds like stealing when I put it that way. That's what record companies and many artists are arguing that people are doing.




On the bright side, a lot of the artists I like will release their music for free, or they allow you to choose how much you want to pay.
#12
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
I think music is moving more and more towards being free (or low subscription fee), and I only see how that will benefit musicians and fans in the long run. The people it doesn't benefit are the giant record companies. I don't really give a shit about those giant corrupt money churners anyway, though.


You go ahead thinking you're sticking it to the man.

#DTWD
Last edited by primusfan at Dec 31, 2014,
#13
I buy all my music now. It's selfish to think that you deserve to have anyone else's music for free.
#14
Quote by JustRooster
I buy all my music now. It's selfish to think that you deserve to have anyone else's music for free.
I don't think anybody does it because they feel like they deserve it. It's more like because it's a convenient option that's there. Like a $20 bill sitting on an empty street.

Not that I'm saying that makes it ok or anything.
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#16
It's always weird to me that people are like "buy merch! buy merch!" to justify piracy but CDs are merch. You can pay $10 for two beers at the pub, but you can't pay $10 for an album you can possess for the rest of your life? In my dreamworld musicians are able to make albums free of cost and live comfortable lives without having to sell a product. Unfortunately, we live in a capitalist society. You may be all idealistic about "music shouldn't be a commodity!" well that's cool. Neither should water or food or shelter. But they are. Because that's the world we live in. And when you pirate music you're just ensuring musicians have a harder time paying for things that "shouldn't be" commodities. But they are. That's how it is.

I have nothing against playing shows for money. It's what I prefer actually. I love playing live more than I love recording albums. But to pretend that you're not cutting out a revenue stream is ludicrous. Why the hell should a band spend $10,000 on making an album if it's going to be a loss? Going on tour is already iffy financially when you're a small band without much name recognition. The point of touring used to be to promote the album. So you're either in debt or you have to charge more for admission to recoup losses of both touring and album production.

People always try to turn the entitled thing around on musicians. They say "blah blah is an entitled **** who thinks people should have to pay them money to listen to their music." No one is entitled to have their services or product used. Sure. But if you're actually USING the product or service and not paying them, then *the listener* is the entitled one.

And everyone hates on major labels for making money off the artist. Who do you think financed the album? Who do you think financed the subsequent tour? Who do you think has bodies in motion getting that music out there? The label. Ween's Pure Guava was their major label debut.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EWUu9ckdwHc

This album was paid for, distributed and promoted by a major record label when most people in the world didn't know who Ween were (consequently, their most famous single is on this album). No company would take that risk today on music this ****ed up and weird. Not because people don't like alternative music now, but because it's no longer financially viable to invest in that kind of band. Even famous pop stars can barely sell albums. Why the hell would Elektra fund an alternative record that *might* sell 3,000 copies?

Now imagine that for a small label or self-released album. When you have even fewer tools at your disposal to fund, distribute and promote an album, why spend money on a non-profitable venture that's, in all likelihood, going to actually lose you money? Labor of love? Cool, it's money and work to make an album. Unfortunately, I can't pay my electric bill with the warm, fuzzy feeling making music gives me.

EDIT: And yeah, I realize the irony of posting the YouTube link to an album when complaining about people not buying music. I'm just trying to make my point that a totally weird ****ed up sounding CD was on a major label because it was profitable when people used to buy music. The less people spend on music, the fewer chances ANYONE is going to take (whether it's independent artist, small label or major). And the more more and more they're going to appeal to the lowest common denominator because they gotta make money somehow. And sure, most pop music has always appealed to that group. But piracy and the Telecommuniations Act of 1996 have increasingly homogenized music.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/07/26/us-science-music-idUSBRE86P0R820120726
#DTWD
Last edited by primusfan at Dec 31, 2014,
#18
Quote by JustRooster
I buy all my music now. It's selfish to think that you deserve to have anyone else's music for free.


+1 I've started buying more music now that I can afford it, plus I like having a physical copy with box art and all. Also, Amazon Autorip is a great tool. Get the MP3's straight away without having to wait for it to get to your door.
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#20
when i start listening to a new band, i pirate their entire discography. but if i like them, i try to buy any new albums they put out. sometimes i'll go and buy and one of their older albums if i like it a lot.

also, the only way i buy an album is on CD. i don't see the point in buying something digital.
#21
as i much as i love the artists, i dont really care. it's the 21st century, this is how it is now. get used to it. your music is available to be downloaded for free, you should be happy. more people will hear it that way. art isn't about making money, you shouldn't expect anything. i don't charge any money for digital downloads. as far as physical copies, i would obvs charge for those because it costs money to buy them and get them pressed and shit and if they really want a physical copy that bad they'll pay for it. but if they just want to hear it, why should they have to pay? in the end, charging money for digital downloads of your music will hurt you in the end. you won't make very much money from it unless you're a celebrity.
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Last edited by deadsmileyface at Dec 31, 2014,
#22
at first when i knew nothing about the smashing pumpkins i torrented two of their albums. now I own them both on CD.
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