#1
so i wanted to put steel strings on my classical guitar
heard the tension would hurt the neck
i got extra light fender strings and i'll tuned 1 step lower (dgcfad) maybe even dropped c
wouldn't that be enough ?
#2
Standard nylon string sets tend to have about half the tension of typical steel-string sets for acoustic guitars.

So, if you go through all those gyrations, you might find that the strings "work" in that they don't tear the guitar apart, but that they don't produce much sound either.

What's the point of this exercise? Is it just that you want a steel string and can't afford one at the moment? You might do better to just save your pennies, sell the classic for whatever you can get, and buy an inexpensive steel string.

Now all that being said..... When I was young and had just married my wife (40 years ago....), she had left her first husband abruptly and also "Her" guitar. So she was wanting a guitar rather badly. We went off to a music store and found a used "Suzuki" classical that had been strung with steel strings. (Neither of us knew anything about guitars back then.)
She played this instrument for a couple of years without any problems and through several string changes...Never a problem.
Of course, this was an inexpensive, plywood instrument and likely built like a tank.
#3
Quote by DeathmoniC
so i wanted to put steel strings on my classical guitar
heard the tension would hurt the neck
i got extra light fender strings and i'll tuned 1 step lower (dgcfad) maybe even dropped c
wouldn't that be enough ?


Yes, that would be enough. You could also use 9 gauge electric guitar strings - they will exert about the same tension as a set of high tension nylon strings in standard E tuning.

The only problems you may have is (1) the steel strings - especially the plain ones - may cut into the nylon tuning pegs and (2) the treble string nut slots are going to be quite a bit wider than the strings.

I did what you are contemplating many years ago (using electric guitar strings). They were on the guitar for about 2 years then I changed back to nylon. That was about 40 years ago and the guitar is still in use today so it obviously survived.

Another alternative - and it's quite a good one - is to use a set of Thomastik-Infeld "John Pearse Folk" strings. These are quite innovative - the basses are regular siverplated copper wound on nylon multifilament but the trebles are nylon tape wound on a steel rope core. They sound much more like steel strings than nylon ones.

http://www.thomastik-infeld.com/family-detail/John%20Pearse%20folk
#4
for some reason, i tried that. even using extra light tomastik plectrums, which are lighter tension than most extra light strings, they still bent the neck of the guitar forward a lot, so i went back to nylon.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#6
Don't do it. Completely ignoring the fact that the tension is way too great for a classical guitar because it does not have a truss rodd - it will also the damage the guitar itself because of the material and the intonation would also be off.
Last edited by Stellar999 at Jan 2, 2015,