#1
I am not exactly what i would call a beginner player, i can work my way through most solos crazy train, the trooper, etc that arent extremely difficult but when it come to the therou im completely clueless. I was just wondering if anyone had any advice on how to further my understanding of whats going on in the music. Are the a few particular scales that would ne good to learn for metal style playing? Or what? All advice appreciated...
#2
Go to your local library and get a book on theory and read it and search the net
#5
Quote by rmcc5017
I am not exactly what i would call a beginner player, i can work my way through most solos crazy train, the trooper, etc that arent extremely difficult but when it come to the therou im completely clueless. I was just wondering if anyone had any advice on how to further my understanding of whats going on in the music. Are the a few particular scales that would ne good to learn for metal style playing? Or what? All advice appreciated...


A very brief summary of standard theory is that it covers notation, key signatures, time signatures, intervals, scales, triad and seventh chords (and inversions), chord progressions, and writing using several melodic parts, note ornamentation.

But a typical theory book is going to be discussing classical music and how the great classical composers created their music (theory is just a set of observations of what these composers collectively did or avoided in common).

The areas that will directly affect your playing (as opposed to reading music) are primarily intervals, scales, chords (and inversions), chord progressions, note ornamentation, and rhythm.

Rhythm for any style of music (at what points in time sounds are made, and how long they are sounded) is hugely important, and can totally change the feel of music.

From the view point of note choice, intervals are fundamental ...they crop up everywhere (scales, chords, melodies). So if you nail these first (really simple) you'll have a good basis. For metal, there's only a few chord types to learn (triads, five "chords" (power "chords")), and using them for progressions. Scale-wise, favourites include natural and harmonic minor, (phrygian), mixolydian, major and minor pentatonics and blues. The above chords are derived from these scales.

Each scale gives you a set of intervals to use from some chosen pitch (in fret terms, on a single string, for example, the harmonic minor scale is created by playing some fret (e.g 5th fret on bass E string), go up 2 frets, then up 1, then up 2, then up 2, then up 1, then up 3, and if you go up 1 again, you're back to square 1 (the same pitch as you started on, but an octave higher). By doing that you're creating intervals that are 2,3,5,7,8 and 11 semitones above the starting pitch. Change the start fret and use the same pattern, you get the same flavour of sound (same scale type), just higher or lower. Of course, a guitar has more than one string, so the above intervals can be created using more than one string ... but that is mechanical detail ... the concept for using a given pattern of intervals for a given scale type doesn't change. Then chords get built by choosing scale members (e.g the 1st, 3rd and 5th scale member).

To get you going, you may find the following helps:
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/the_basics/drastically_reduce_learning_time_with_intervals_part_3.html ... work back to the first lesson using the links in the intro of each.

Good luck,
Jerry
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Jan 1, 2015,
#6
Learn the note names, intervals, scales - chromatic, major, minor (learn how to build scales) - and chords (construction, functions). Start with those.

When you learn anything theoretic, remember to listen to the sound of it too. Sound is the most important part of music. So don't just learn a bunch of fingerings. You do nothing with them if you can't use them. And to learn to use them you need to know their sound.

Also, remember that theory just explains music. There are no rules that you need to follow. If something sounds good, it can be explained. If something sounds bad, it can be explained. Nothing in music is against theory.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#7
Harmonic minor and cyprian (minor scale with sharp 7 and flat 4) scales are very metal.

Trying different modes in the same key can give you edgy variances in writing melodies that are sinister.
"Hey kid. You wanna cigarette?"


"No thanks! I/m already hooked on Fonicks!"

#8
^ Never heard of "cyprian". Also, flat 4 is basically the same as major third.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#9
Quote by Panasonic3
Harmonic minor and cyprian (minor scale with sharp 7 and flat 4) scales are very metal.

And this, kids, is how to sound generic as shit. Don't worry about what scale to use. Just write riffs/melodies in your key of choice. The specific scale is about as meaningful as taking a dump.