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#1
Hey all! My first post here. Thing is, I always felt quite wrong playing a bunch of guitars at a shop knowing that I won't buy anything. Then I end up buying a set of strings or a pick.
By guitar shop I don't mean a big one like guitar centre! just local small businesses.
#2
There's nothing wrong with it so long as you aren't disturbing people or being an annoyance.


Personally though? I don't try out like 7 guitars or pedals in the store unless I'm planning on buying one. Not a big fan of being a tire kicker.
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#3
I typically only play the guitars when I am planning on buying one. I will test some cool, unusual guitars if I see them.

But then again I never go to a music store without intending to buy something. The closest music store in my area is 25 miles away in a city I'm not too fond of (Daytona Beach) because it is just dirty. Or I have to drive 50ish miles to find a music store with good selection/inventory other than that.
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#4
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
There's nothing wrong with it so long as you aren't disturbing people or being an annoyance.

Personally though? I don't try out like 7 guitars or pedals in the store unless I'm planning on buying one. Not a big fan of being a tire kicker.


If you're auditioning something to buy it, that's one thing. If you're simply playing a bunch of things to entertain yourself, then you've become an annoyance. The other problem is that you've cost yourself and others money. Part of what we pay for when we buy something at a brick and mortar store is the pilferage and damage that random players produce. I've picked up "wall" guitars that are dirty, snot-globbed, chipped, pick-scratched, buckle-rashed, dented at the very least, with others that have been downtuned, strings blackened, knobs chipped or even bashed in. When the store owner takes a loss on these, he makes it up in what he charges the people who actually buy.

I know there are people who hang in these stores practicing on good guitars because theirs aren't set up well, and they just take up floor space ("I'll try that amp later when that guy isn't there") and sonic space ("How many times is that guy going to try playing Eruption?" "Does that guy ever use any of the OTHER strings?").

As a result, I rarely hit a Guitar Center, and when I do, I'm usually picking up what I want and making a fast tour to see if there's anything new, and then I'm out. There ARE a couple of mom and pop shops that have a back room and amp for you to try out guitars, and the Carvin store used to have a couple of rooms that were more or less sound-deadening where you could try things out.

If you're out on the main floor trying out guitar after guitar at volume...you're an annoyance. And an expense for the rest of us.
#6
Quote by dspellman
If you're auditioning something to buy it, that's one thing. If you're simply playing a bunch of things to entertain yourself, then you've become an annoyance. The other problem is that you've cost yourself and others money. Part of what we pay for when we buy something at a brick and mortar store is the pilferage and damage that random players produce. 1. I've picked up "wall" guitars that are dirty, snot-globbed, chipped, pick-scratched, buckle-rashed, dented at the very least, with others that have been downtuned, strings blackened, knobs chipped or even bashed in. When the store owner takes a loss on these, he makes it up in what he charges the people who actually buy.

2a: I know there are people who hang in these stores practicing on good guitars because theirs aren't set up well, and they just take up floor space ("I'll try that amp later when that guy isn't there") and 2b: sonic space ("How many times is that guy going to try playing Eruption?" "Does that guy ever use any of the OTHER strings?").

As a result, I rarely hit a Guitar Center, and when I do, I'm usually picking up what I want and making a fast tour to see if there's anything new, and then I'm out. There ARE a couple of mom and pop shops that have a back room and amp for you to try out guitars, and the Carvin store used to have a couple of rooms that were more or less sound-deadening where you could try things out.

3. If you're out on the main floor trying out guitar after guitar at volume...you're an annoyance. And an expense for the rest of us.


Not that I don't agree with some points but:

1: that's a crap ton of hyperbole. Seriously? Snot covered and bashed to the point where volume knobs are bashed in?

2: That's what I mean by being an annoyance.

3: see above
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


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I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
Last edited by H4T3BR33D3R at Jan 1, 2015,
#7
Quote by Asado
Ok thanks. Won't do it again.

By all means try guitars when you go to a store, that is what they are there for. You can figure out what guitar styles work best for you among many other features you will like or hate.

But don't just hangout in the music store to practice on a better guitar than yours. But trying a higer-end guitar (or any guitar) with no intentions of buying is absolutely fine that is the only way many ever get to play them

dspellman can act like an ass sometimes and I don't agree with most of his post
2002 PRS CE22
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Last edited by Robbgnarly at Jan 1, 2015,
#8
Quote by Robbgnarly
By all means try guitars when you go to a store, that is what they are there for. You can figure out what guitar styles work best for you among many other features you will like or hate.


Yeah there's nothing wrong with trying stuff out but if you came to the place and your only intention is to sit there for hours and shred on guitars then it's a bit of a problem.


Just some things to maybe consider:

1. Don't play too loud unless it's really necessary (as in, you're buying a tube amp or something and you want to hear it loud before you buy it). Other people may want to try things out as well and if you're wailing away and they can't hear what they're doing then it gets a bit annoying. (Also, if somebody else turns up their amp, that's not a signal for you to turn yours up louder)

2. If you do detune guitars, make sure you can tune them back up afterwards. Really though, aside from maybe dropping your E to a D, I probably wouldn't go crazy. (like tuning the guitar to something weird). If you break a string let somebody at the store know. I'd probably offer to replace the strings but that's just me

3. Be careful and mindful of the products. I mean, you don't own them and the store has to sell them so be respectful of that. So don't strum the guitars like you're trying to tenderize meat and don't stomp on pedals like you're trying to squish cockroaches.

4. Also, try not to pester the floor guys too much if it's busy and you aren't going to buy anything.
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
Last edited by H4T3BR33D3R at Jan 1, 2015,
#9
For a lot of those small guitar shops selling stuff like strings, plectrums & cables etc is their bread & butter. If they get to recognise you as someone who spends a bit of money there regularly, they'll never mind you having a play on a few guitars while you're there.

Obviously don't be a pain in the arse, but get to know them. Chat to them if/when they seem willing. Once they get to know you, when you go in there they'll probably occasionally point out something new that they think you might like to have a play on.

Just keep spending the money on the small things (and occasional larger things), and they'll be glad to see you every time.
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#10
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Not that I don't agree with some points but:

1: that's a crap ton of hyperbole. Seriously? Snot covered and bashed to the point where volume knobs are bashed in?


I wish it were. Friend of mine picked up an Epiphone LP, we had to take it back because one pot stem was *bent* and another was pushed into the control cavity. He's a beginner, didn't even look at the knobs before buying the guitar. I'm not sure it was snot, but there was definitely some boogery looking stuff on a couple of the guitars I looked at a couple of days ago at the Pasadena GC. I KNOW it sounds like a crap ton of hyperbole; I probably wouldn't have believed some of it if I was simply TOLD about it, but every single one of those is something I've seen personally.

Several months ago (maybe more like 12 or 13, come to think of it) I noticed a nice Ibanez 2219 (about 1978) on the used wall, in pretty decent condition, with the original knobs. I mentioned to the manager that he should probably move it higher on the wall to prevent the knobs being stolen (at the time they were going for $45 each on eBay!). Next time I was in, the knobs were gone. Manager said, sheepishly, "Guess you were right; they were gone within two days." About the same time, there was an LP Supreme (2006) on the wall that I was sort of interested in. Next time I was in, I picked it up and found that someone had dropped it on its bottom hard enough to bash in the bottom back of it (it's essentially a hollowbody) about 1/4" by about three inches.

More than a couple of guitars hanging on that wall right now are new, but have blackened strings with stalactites (typical toxic sweat stuff). Only a matter of time before they've rusted through and snapped.

GCs are already in financial difficulty; you'll find a larger mix of cheap guitars and inexpensive used gear (most of the higher end used gear isn't in the non-flagship stores here in LA). The keyboard department has way more used gear than ever before and way fewer high-end keyboards (Korg Chromes, but no PA3X, no Kronos). The Pasadena store is in a relatively affluent area, but the manager admits that part of the problem is the issue with damage to display merchandise.
#11
Quote by Robbgnarly

dspellman can act like an ass sometimes and I don't agree with most of his post


And when I DO act like an ass, I try to do a good job of it.
Differences of opinion are what make threads interesting to read.
I've worked in music stores, I've been in marketing for years and I usually know the guys who manage the ones I frequent.

If you get to NAMM, ask some of the dealers and store owners in attendance what their biggest expenses are after rent, insurance and utilities.

And then tell THEM that you don't agree with whatever they're telling you.
#12
Wow thats legitimately crazy. ^
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#13
To amplify *ahem dspellman's post about guitar "vandals", one of my favorite little family-owned & operated music stores went through a period in which someone kept stealing the tremolo arms off of guitars. I was in there on another occasion and found a Gibson LP with the selector switch broken off. (How do you DO that?)

People can be asses.
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#14
Music shops are notorious for the condescending assholεs who run them. I've planned to buy before and walked out simply because of the terrible service. Anyway, yes it is okay to play guitars in a guitar shop, how else are you going to choose? Whether they let you or not depends on how douchey the staff are.
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#15
My friend works at GC and always says 'how can you tell the best player in a GC? Its the guy you cant hear playing.' Idk if thats true for all of them or just the one he works at

For the most part they dont care if you poke around and play quietly. However blues noodling, sunshine of your love and endless drop D chugging all at max volume gets really old really fast and is gonna make the clerks treat you with a real 'sh*t or get off the pot' mentality. When ever Im in big guitar store I dont mind playing stuff thats just kinda lying about and looks like it gets some use. However I feel like a jerk asking a clerk to help me get a $3000 taylor off the wall that I have no intention of buying. But if youre there to spend some coin play whatever you want. You wouldnt buy a car without test driving it.

I myself work teach at a mom and pop guitar store and as mentioned above pics, strings, lessons etc are our money maker so as long youre buying something youre free to play whatever you want. Word of mouth is really important to us so we're really lax with customers. As long as youre not disturbing the lessons its all good.

It really just depends on the attitude of the owner or clerks. Theres a certain vibe you get when you walk in
#16
It’s generally ok as long as you aren’t an ass about it. But don’t be the dickhead who sits in front of an amp, cranks the gain, and plays the same chugga chugga riff over and over. Also, don’t request the staff let you test stuff you aren’t going to buy. If you’re making them pull out one pedal after another for an hour that means they’re not taking care of the customers who actually want to buy stuff.
#17
We have a small local store around here that sits towards the nicer side of town. Been in there twice. Once I was in a pinch to get a preamp tube, no choice really. The other time, I went in with one of my guitar buddies and we were floored at how they operated. They had some nice stuff in there, a handful of Heritages, some Fenders, a Handful of ESP's some older used Gibsons and a crap ton of LTD's of various stripes. The guys seemed knowledgeable and friendly enough but what floored me was the little sign every few guitars that said "Do not touch, please ask for assistance." Ok, maybe they just don't want you to ding the crap out of everything taking it down off the rack.

Then I watched another customer come in and well basically, no. You can't touch any of their stuff. If something interests you, they will be more than happy to take it down, plug it in and demo it FOR you. THIS is how they've chosen to deal with the problem referenced in earlier posts.

To me, as a paying consumer, this is unacceptable. I understand why they do it, but a business has to understand that there is such a thing s "Cost of doing business." If you maintain a storefront, you don't want that stuff to happen, but it does, and you pay that price in order to provide that product and make some money. And not letting people try the instruments, to me, is very unwelcoming. I buy stuff online all the time. Sometimes even guitars, but when I can see the guitar sitting two feet in front of me, it's a bit overpriced, and I can't touch it until I've paid, I'm not going to be very likely to purchase it, regardless of how well the sales guy can make it sound.

*** Personal addendum: I don't wander into a music store unless I NEED something. I'm too much at risk to buy crap I don't need. And more often than not, when I walk in there it's for something VERY specific. As an example I actually got in my car earlier this week and drove out to a large indy store 90 miles away to buy in person something I saw them put up on reverb. I was in and out pretty quick. Had a nice lunch on the way back
Last edited by Hydra26 at Jan 1, 2015,
#18
as long as you're not there 2-3 hours a day. That and playing too loud or whatever to piss the guys working there off. he mindset is that you have money. You are willing to spend on a guitar to keep the shop opened so you're very important no matter what your skill level is. I encourage it highly to try as many guitars and stuff as you can in shops.
#19
I do it, but only on acoustics, except in my mate's store, where I will very occasionally plug in an electric. I almost always buy something, like a set of strings, when I do. The way I see it, I'm always more or less in the market for a new guitar, and it is the only way to find out what is in the market. For example, how else would you find out if a particular make or model is any good? - Wikiwisdom doesn't cut it with me. If it is a store that doesn't know me well, I always ask, and only once have I encounteed anything that approached antipathy to tire-kicking. - And they had some good acoustics, that at the time I would seriously have considered buying, so there was a good chance that they lost a sale on a fairly big $ item.
#20
You could just ask them if it's ok. Even if they're ok with it, it's nicer to ask instead of just servicing yourself.
#22
It's pretty simple, really. You need to respect everyone else's comfort (i.e. Regardless of skill level, but especially if it'll sound awful, don't blast the amp), and ideally the guys working at the store should be confident that your playing the guitars will lead to you spending money. Other than that it's fine, because if it influences your purchases, there's a decent chance the shop will benefit from that. There is a limit, though. Don't want some kid damaging a 2 grand Gibson before it's been sold.

The place where I usually buy my guitars has a pretty simple policy: If you want to play something you ask the guys working there and you take off any jackets with zips or studs. They probably wouldn't let you play something miles out of your realistic price range, though something a bit beyond what you can afford would be fine, especially if it's providing you genuinely useful information about your coming purchases. And if you spend money there, especially making the occasional big purchase, they'll be all the more accommodating.

People working at music shops want you to like the store and they want you to want to buy the guitars there. Chances are they're even human beings who might enjoy talking to you when they don't have more important things to do. They don't want you to waste their time, damage the instruments or annoy the other customers.
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#23
It's totally about respect .... for other shoppers in the store , for the store owner ..... when you pick up a guitar off the wall , please make sure you wearing the right clothing to NOT hurt the guitar , leave the big belt buckle at home , take your watch off , no coat zippers , clothing buttons , just common sense stuff that you would want somebody to treat your gear the same way ..... treat the guitar like your life depends on it not getting hurt .... don't play shit you can't buy just in case something happens so they don't try to hold you responsible for damage ..... respect others and be responsible and careful when handling someone else's gear
Last edited by Fumble fingers at Jan 1, 2015,
#24
As the guy who works at the small local guitar shop, and sees it all the time... Yeah, it can be pretty damn annoying. As everyone else has said, if you're actually shopping for a guitar and intend to buy one, hell yes, play away. You pretty much have to, to decide what to buy. But when you're that guy who never buys anything but picks and strings, can't afford a guitar, isn't really shopping, but just sits around playing half a dozen guitars for hours on end, then come back to do it again several times a week.... Yeah, you're annoying as hell and the employees hate you.

Everybody likes the guitar shop to be a laid back environment, but it's still a store. We rely on selling things to get by. My job depends on it. When you play the shit out of a guitar with no intention of buying it (or even considering buying it), you're not only wasting my time, but you're also wearing on the guitar, leaving it with finish scratches and possibly other small dings, which will eventually make it look less-than-new, which means I'm most likely going to have to discount it when someone actually does want to buy it. And profit margins in the music industry are paper-thin.

Which leads me to my next point: Stop asking for discounts on everything! It seems (in my experience over the last 2 years working at the shop) that everybody just assumes that you shouldn't pay full price for instruments. EVERY SINGLE TIME, it's "so... I like the guitar, I'll take it for $100 less". Or, "is this the best price you can give me? I might have to go to guitar center instead". Even though every single item in my store is the exact same price, to the penny, that it is at guitar center, or any online retailer. I check every day. I don't get why people seem to think that this retail business is open to constant haggling. Do you demand discounts on everything, and extra free accessories at Wal Mart? **** no you don't. And if you did, they'd look at you like you're crazy and say, "ummm... that's not how it works". And again, profit margins are shit in this industry. There isn't a lot of room to discount. I've even had customers go so far as to get up on some bullshit "I support local business" high horse, and then ask for discounts. They'll say something like, "I was looking at this guitar at guitar center, but I don't like the corporate atmosphere over there, and the employees didn't know their shit, and I'd rather support local business anyway... So I'll take it if you give me $100 off". And then I have to bite my tongue to resist getting very rude and saying, "You want to support local business, but having the exact same product at the exact same price as the big box store competition isn't enough? You also want this small local business to discount it to the point that our profit margin is barely even 10%? And you deserve this discount because you're being such a good guy and supporting local business? **** you. You don't give a shit about supporting local business. You just feel like the small local shop is more likely to give you a discount, because we actually NEED to make the sales to stay in business, you ****ing vulture."

Okay, end rant. I just had to get that off my chest, as it's been especially bad these last few weeks. We're already discounting the shit out of a bunch of stuff, for a holiday sale, and people STILL ask to get it even cheaper. We had guitars marked down to more than half off regular price (not "retail". street price. So, like 70-80% off "retail"), and people still ask for another $20-$50. On some of those guitars, another $20 off would put it below our wholesale cost. THAT's how shitty profit margins are in this industry.
Last edited by the_bi99man at Jan 1, 2015,
#25
Paying retail is for stupid people. There is absolutely nothing wrong with trying to get a better price. I got almost $600 dropped from when I bought my PRS. Their asking price $1999.99 price I paid $1425 + tax, now tell me you wouldn't want to get a deal like that.
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#26
Quote by Robbgnarly
Paying retail is for stupid people. There is absolutely nothing wrong with trying to get a better price. I got almost $600 dropped from when I bought my PRS. Their asking price $1999.99 price I paid $1425 + tax, now tell me you wouldn't want to get a deal like that.


Nobody pays "retail". "Retail" is an arbitrary number, used to make people think they're constantly getting deals. Nobody sells anything at MSRP in this industry. Nobody. They don't even ask. When a brand new guitar comes in, and gets put on the showroom floor, the day-one asking price is what's called "street price". It's based on MAP (minimum advertised price), and is usually about 30% off of MSRP. THAT is "regular price". MSRP is only there to make people think they're getting a special deal. Asking for further discounts beyond that price, at least when the instrument is still brand new and in flawless condition, is a dick move. It's insulting to the business.
#27
Quote by the_bi99man
Nobody pays "retail". "Retail" is an arbitrary number, used to make people think they're constantly getting deals. Nobody sells anything at MSRP in this industry. Nobody. They don't even ask. When a brand new guitar comes in, and gets put on the showroom floor, the day-one asking price is what's called "street price". It's based on MAP (minimum advertised price), and is usually about 30% off of MSRP. THAT is "regular price". MSRP is only there to make people think they're getting a special deal. Asking for further discounts beyond that price, at least when the instrument is still brand new and in flawless condition, is a dick move. It's insulting to the business.

Well I asked for that much off because the guitar was a 2 yr old model that had no sold, bit I will still haggle on certain things, but they are almost always $1000ish +. But the few stores I go to I have been going since the mid 90's and I know the owners/managers so they typically throw a 10% discount on anything I buy. But on bigger purchases I ask for a bigger discount, the worst they can say is no. But I have also dropped well over $5000 at each store over the years.
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#28
Quote by dspellman
If you're auditioning something to buy it, that's one thing. If you're simply playing a bunch of things to entertain yourself, then you've become an annoyance. The other problem is that you've cost yourself and others money. Part of what we pay for when we buy something at a brick and mortar store is the pilferage and damage that random players produce. I've picked up "wall" guitars that are dirty, snot-globbed, chipped, pick-scratched, buckle-rashed, dented at the very least, with others that have been downtuned, strings blackened, knobs chipped or even bashed in. When the store owner takes a loss on these, he makes it up in what he charges the people who actually buy.


I sell guitars for a living. The profit made from the guitars that sell barely, and some times don't even come close to meeting, the cost of a guitar meant for sale getting beat to the point where it's unsellable at the proper price. We'd really just appreciate if all the guitars were treated with respect. I don't hover anyone, anyone can take any guitar on or off the wall as they please, but it's done with the understanding that the stuff gets respected.

Quote by dspellman
I know there are people who hang in these stores practicing on good guitars because theirs aren't set up well, and they just take up floor space ("I'll try that amp later when that guy isn't there") and sonic space ("How many times is that guy going to try playing Eruption?" "Does that guy ever use any of the OTHER strings?").

As a result, I rarely hit a Guitar Center, and when I do, I'm usually picking up what I want and making a fast tour to see if there's anything new, and then I'm out. There ARE a couple of mom and pop shops that have a back room and amp for you to try out guitars, and the Carvin store used to have a couple of rooms that were more or less sound-deadening where you could try things out.


I don't know how GC employees can stick around for as long as they do. That franchise has a lot of lifers.

Quote by dspellman
If you're out on the main floor trying out guitar after guitar at volume...you're an annoyance. And an expense for the rest of us.


Yes!
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#29
Quote by JustRooster
I don't know how GC employees can stick around for as long as they do. That franchise has a lot of lifers.


They’re like used car dealers and preachers. Most of them aren’t good salesmen and wash out quickly. But a few are naturally slick and know how to spot a sucker and they do just fine.
#30
Quote by jpnyc
They’re like used car dealers and preachers. Most of them aren’t good salesmen and wash out quickly. But a few are naturally slick and know how to spot a sucker and they do just fine.


You know you're the worst poster in this forum, right?
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#31
There's always different point of views.

If my local store went out of business I'd happily cheer for the fact. I have no illusions about how it is to run a music store, and the information in this thread only strengthens my assumptions, but any store who treat their customers badly doesn't deserve their business. I have since a couple of years and clashes with the local business completely abandoned them for buying online. Zero problems, no more being treated differently because they don't think you have the money.

To answer the question - as long as you're aware of what you're doing and the potential consequences of your actions, play away.
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How you know you have too many guitars...

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#32
Quote by Robbgnarly
Paying retail is for stupid people.


My local shop is as cheap as the cheapest online retailers, so...


There is absolutely nothing wrong with trying to get a better price.


No there isn't, but there's something wrong with playing a guitar in a shop to buy it somewhere else. That's really unfair, running that shop costs a lot of money, and you're abusing that service. If you want to buy a guitar from some online retailer, then also use their service (if there is any), not another shop's.
#33
Quote by dspellman
I wish it were. Friend of mine picked up an Epiphone LP, we had to take it back because one pot stem was *bent* and another was pushed into the control cavity. He's a beginner, didn't even look at the knobs before buying the guitar. I'm not sure it was snot, but there was definitely some boogery looking stuff on a couple of the guitars I looked at a couple of days ago at the Pasadena GC. I KNOW it sounds like a crap ton of hyperbole; I probably wouldn't have believed some of it if I was simply TOLD about it, but every single one of those is something I've seen personally.

Several months ago (maybe more like 12 or 13, come to think of it) I noticed a nice Ibanez 2219 (about 1978) on the used wall, in pretty decent condition, with the original knobs. I mentioned to the manager that he should probably move it higher on the wall to prevent the knobs being stolen (at the time they were going for $45 each on eBay!). Next time I was in, the knobs were gone. Manager said, sheepishly, "Guess you were right; they were gone within two days." About the same time, there was an LP Supreme (2006) on the wall that I was sort of interested in. Next time I was in, I picked it up and found that someone had dropped it on its bottom hard enough to bash in the bottom back of it (it's essentially a hollowbody) about 1/4" by about three inches.

More than a couple of guitars hanging on that wall right now are new, but have blackened strings with stalactites (typical toxic sweat stuff). Only a matter of time before they've rusted through and snapped.

GCs are already in financial difficulty; you'll find a larger mix of cheap guitars and inexpensive used gear (most of the higher end used gear isn't in the non-flagship stores here in LA). The keyboard department has way more used gear than ever before and way fewer high-end keyboards (Korg Chromes, but no PA3X, no Kronos). The Pasadena store is in a relatively affluent area, but the manager admits that part of the problem is the issue with damage to display merchandise.
Guitar store near me(UK),Big superstore.When i was buying an LP(which i ended up taking back),Every LP i tried had rough rusted sweated up strings,I know it was only the strings but its kinda off putting when you're thinking about buying a guitar and it feels like crap.If i was a beginner it would've put me right off buying the guitar.
#34
Store's that care are always cleaning the guitars and making sure they are in tune for the next potential customer.

But I do hate stores that are very uppity, thankfully the few stores with in a short drive are all cool guys.
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#35
Quote by Robbgnarly
Paying retail is for stupid people. There is absolutely nothing wrong with trying to get a better price. I got almost $600 dropped from when I bought my PRS. Their asking price $1999.99 price I paid $1425 + tax, now tell me you wouldn't want to get a deal like that.



Off retail, yeah, but if the guitar is at MAP, then it becomes a problem for me. Electric guitars already have some of the lowest margin of anything not only in the music world, but in retail in general. If you get deals that drop like that, it usually means it was an old stock guitar they didn't mind getting rid of.

Quote by Knarrenheino

No there isn't, but there's something wrong with playing a guitar in a shop to buy it somewhere else. That's really unfair, running that shop costs a lot of money, and you're abusing that service. If you want to buy a guitar from some online retailer, then also use their service (if there is any), not another shop's.


Thanks, man. I'd high five you if I could.

Quote by Robbgnarly
Store's that care are always cleaning the guitars and making sure they are in tune for the next potential customer.

But I do hate stores that are very uppity, thankfully the few stores with in a short drive are all cool guys.


Depends on the shop. I work at a full-line music store, which means we have orchestra, band, pianos, etc. I'm the only combo guy, so I run the guitars, drums, and a lot of pro audio. I also work as the guitar tech there. I do my best, but sometimes there just aren't enough hours in a day to worry about wiping some finger prints.


It's absolutely okay to ask for a lower price. It really is. If a person who works at a store selling guitars is really cool, they'll drop it if it's retail, they'll let you know if there's a deal if it's at MAP, or they'll politely say that they can't budge on the price, but they'd be happy to throw in something like picks or strings.

Trust me, I've seen behind the counter of guitar sales for a while. The overhead on new guitars sucks. There's a reason a lot of shops are really investing in flipping used stuff.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#36
I'm guilty of going to GC for strings/cables/picks etc. and sitting down and playing guitar for at least a few minutes just for fun. Although I only play the 'low hanging' and 'set out' guitars that are usually inexpensive that I can help myself to. Last thing I want to do is take up a salesman time and get their hopes up asking them to get me down a $3,000 PRS or Gibson when I have zero intention of buying.
2002 Gibson Les Paul Studio
2014 Fender Strat (American Nitro Honeyburst)
2003 Ibanez Acoustic
Digitech RP500
Blackstar HT5R
#37
I agree with most of dspellman's post. When I started playing there were several music stores in my area that provided decent service and relatively acceptable prices. After being recognized as a serious customer (I always bought something), I became very friendly with the people who worked for or owned two of those stores. When GC hit our area (North Jersey) and opened two GC stores, they disappeared. They couldn't compete. I miss those stores as I am not fond of GC. It's not the fault of the people who work at GC as they seem generally friendly and helpful but because of the people who go there. I don't think I have ever been in a GC when someone isn't blasting something some crap on an amp near the front of the store. It's annoying, rude and often done by a bad player who thinks he is impressing someone I guess (hint: you suck, we hate you). A few months ago I was trying out a used Epiphone Tribute that someone dropped tuned to the key of Q I think. That alone was a pain in the ass but then some metal maniac who thought he was Malmsteen (not even close) decided to see how loud one of amps would go and started playing about 10 feet away. I was using a tuner clipped to the headstock and the vibration from Mr. Malmsteen Very Light was killing the tuner. I just gave up trying to tune that Epiphone and left. I was seriously interested in buying that guitar and it pissed me off. In days gone by the local store (which was privately owned) would rarely if ever let that happen because the owners or staff would stop you immediately. They were invested personally in equipment and it was their loss if something happened to the instruments and amps. GC has a bunch of employees who (nice as they usually are), don’t have a dime invested in what happens if something is broken, misused or stolen.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Jan 2, 2015,
#38
yes it's okay to try gear you may want to purchase, i highly recommend it.

i worked in a sam ash store for some time. the shit i've seen done to new guitars by a**hole customers is ridiculous. i've seen people's initials gouged into the backs of guitars, new guitars.

knobs bashed into the guitar cavitities, jacks broken, strap pins pulled out of the guitar, headstocks snapped off gibson les pauls.

ok the headstock was my bad, it never should have been in that stand anyway. kicked it right over oops. at least it was a studio thank goodness.

i'd love to know how much sam ash writes off in damaged inventory every year. GC must be 3x as bad.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#39
Depends on the guitar. Fender has dealer insurance credit as part of their contracts. If you carry a certain line of Fenders, and one gets damaged in-store, all you have to do is return it to the factory and they'll replace it or give you the credit to replace it with the same model of a different color. Yamaha generally works like that, too.


Might be different for GC/Sam Ash style stores, though, not sure. I work for a smaller business. It's nice, because I get to see the whole picture of the retail aspect of music.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
Last edited by JustRooster at Jan 2, 2015,
#40
LONG STORY SHORT:

Play what you like. Any relatively cool associate won't mind that you're trying stuff out if you're either somewhat brief or you're interested in a purchase; maybe not right away, but eventually. We don't mind if you try a guitar a bunch that you're saving up for at all!

The overall idea is to be respectful. It's absolutely okay to ask for a lower price. It's not okay to get offensive if you don't get a lower price, though. If a company sells a guitar for the same prices as Sweetwater, or Musiciansfriend, etc, it very often means they're taking a large hit out of the profits they need to operate the store.

Plus, with a brick and mortar store, you don't pay shipping/handling, you can return it within policy and get your cash back immediately, and you get a free setup. That's worth a lot right there.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
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