#1
Are there any good guitar theory methods out there that cover everything? from A to Z so to speak? I'd like to become complete
PSN name = Barmanation
#2
I don't think you can become "complete". Nothing will cover everything. Start with the basics. What's most important is not knowing all the fancy theoretical terms. What is important is to learn how it works in a context. You want to learn theory if you want to understand what's happening in music.

When you learn theory, remember to listen to the sound. For example when you learn a scale or a chord, listen to how it sounds like. Don't just learn the fingerings. And listen to how it sounds like in a context! Music is always in a context.

Also forget about "guitar theory". It is called "music theory" because it isn't exclusive to just guitar - it applies to all instruments.

I don't know about any books but I would recommend starting with note names, intervals, chromatic, major and minor scales (learn how to build scales), keys (learn to hear the tonic), chords (construction, functions). Remember the sound!!
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Jan 3, 2015,
#3
Quote by MaggaraMarine
I don't think you can become "complete". Nothing will cover everything. Start with the basics. What's most important is not knowing all the fancy theoretical terms. What is important is to learn how it works in a context. You want to learn theory if you want to understand what's happening in music.

When you learn theory, remember to listen to the sound. For example when you learn a scale or a chord, listen to how it sounds like. Don't just learn the fingerings. And listen to how it sounds like in a context! Music is always in a context.

Also forget about "guitar theory". It is called "music theory" because it isn't exclusive to just guitar - it applies to all instruments.

I don't know about any books but I would recommend starting with note names, intervals, chromatic, major and minor scales (learn how to build scales), keys (learn to hear the tonic), chords (construction, functions). Remember the sound!!



Thank you for taking the time to type that!

I fully understand your comment, it was wel written and i'm glad you mentioned context because I know what you mean by it and I am happy to say that I find myself pretty able to apply this trait to what I already can play.

The rest of your advice seems like the kind of stuff I need, i'll look into it.

Have a good day
PSN name = Barmanation
#7
Theory is basically explaining the abstract language of music in words, and as that that is all it is. implementing the theory is the hard part and as that everyone has its way of taking the theory and implementing it on the fretboard. for example Pat Martino turns everything into minor, Joe Pass reduces everything to major minor and dominant etc.

check out Jimmy Bruno, I heard good stuff on his teaching method
#8
Guitar grimoire series.
"Hey kid. You wanna cigarette?"


"No thanks! I/m already hooked on Fonicks!"

#9
I agree with Magarra to an extent. For example, I teach it for the guitar and its aimed for the guitarists in its application. But the theory itself remains intact. The bb7 of C dim7 is still Bbb, for example, but if you are a guitar player, "guitar theory" in my mind integrates the understanding of theory with the application of it to the physical geometry of the guitar.

A great example is, the understanding of the essential chord tones, in a Guitar context. More concretely, a Dominant 13 chord formula works out to be a 7 note chord. If you're on 6 strings and 4 fingers the application to the guitar is different than it would be on a 10 finger instrument like a piano.

Best,

Sean