#1
I just noticed about a 4" crack in the back of my seagull solid wood guitar. The crack appears to be just on the outer surface and not all the way through. What can I do for damage control to prevent it from spreading? Is it possible to have it repaired?

I'm not sure what caused the crack. I did bang it slightly on my computer chair a few days ago but didn't notice any damage afterward. Could it be a humidity issue since it's a solid wood guitar and it's wintertime? I use a kyser lifeguard but I sometimes get lazy and don't always keep it in.
#2
you can get a crack repaired. take it to a luthier and get it stabilized.

the crack could easily be caused by dryness, although it could be from the bang against the chair, too. i'm guessing you don't use a hygrometer? have you considered humidifying your residence rather than using one of those annoying case hygrometers?
Quote by Skeet UK
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#3
Have it repaired. It can only get worse, not better.

The problem might be humidity. I live in a fairly kind climate, but I still keep a check on the humidity in my music room with a cheap hygrometer. Anything less than 40% is getting into the danger zone. Case humidifiers work fine so long as you remember to keep them topped up.
#4
I just bought a room humidifier, gonna have to get hygrometer too. My apartment was just switched from steam radiator heat to electric so it's probably drier than usual, haven't had any dry skin or dry lips though. I think the crack was caused by lack of humidity because there isn't any scuff or mark from where I banged it, just a crack. I didn't think dryness would crack a guitar that quickly, always thought it took years.

The guitar is in otherwise mint condition so I'm relieved to know it can be repaired. I'll take it to the shop this week. Thanks for the replies.
#5
I took the guitar to the shop and he had his "wood expert" take a look at it. Well it turns out it was the bang the computer chair armrest that did the damage because the brace underneath is also cracked. They told me the guitar is still playable. They couldn't fix it and it might make it worse if he tried to fix it. I'm not satisfied with this verdict and will look for somewhere else to take it. A finish crack and a cracked brace are both repairable, aren't they?
#6
Quote by rohash
I took the guitar to the shop and he had his "wood expert" take a look at it. Well it turns out it was the bang the computer chair armrest that did the damage because the brace underneath is also cracked. They told me the guitar is still playable. They couldn't fix it and it might make it worse if he tried to fix it. I'm not satisfied with this verdict and will look for somewhere else to take it. A finish crack and a cracked brace are both repairable, aren't they?


Yes, they sure are, it isn't a big deal for an experienced repairer. I wouldn't leave it too long, because I would want the cracks to not get dirty, apart from the risk of further deterioration.
#7
Quote by rohash
I just bought a room humidifier, gonna have to get hygrometer too. My apartment was just switched from steam radiator heat to electric so it's probably drier than usual,..[ ].....
As soon as you start getting hit with static shocks, you know the humidity is too low, possibly too low. Steam will dry out the air almost as well as an electric heater. Any central heater will drop the humidity. Plus, many older units don't have a humidifier built in. You actually need a flame lit in the same air you're heating, to create humidity.

I heat mostly with kerosene. The byproduct of combustion is CO2 and H20, (better known as carbon dioxide and water). So the longer you run a vent-less heater, the more water vapor it makes. But know what? Even at that, I sit a pan of water on top of it when it's really cold outside. Otherwise, you cold get knocked out by static, just trying to pick up your cat.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 8, 2015,