#1
Hi guys! i was thinking about buying a new guitar and i realized the price difference between the fixed bridge and the floating one is only around 30-40 euros.
if i block the floyd rose wouldn't it be the same as a fixed bridge? could i change tunings just from unlocking the nut and would i lose sustain?
it seems that buying the floyd rose version would be better because if i regret it, i can just block it since it's a fairly easy thing to do and it isn't permanent.
#2
I just installed a Tremol-no on my guitar. Sweet little gadget. I can lock the Floyd into a hardtail, make it dive only or leave it full floating.

No loss of sustain when in hardtail mode and I can just unlock at the nut, tune it, and then lock it back.
#3
If you don't want the Floyd Rose, I would suggest you don't get it. I find a Floyd Rose has less sustain than a fixed bridge.
#4
A lot of wood has to be displaced by the Floyd, which is going to change how the instrument sounds somewhat. It's not a major issue and it's not necessarily better or worse, but it is a difference.

Other than that, the fine tuners are actually nice to have. Some people would prefer a flatter bridge for palm-muting or if you rest your hand there.
#5
My first thought is that you tend to pay a little bit more for a guitar with a quality tremolo to start off, then add whatever it costs you to properly block it. Let's call it an additional $150-200?

That's a pedal.
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#6
I have a Floyd in my Schecter V and I blocked it with two chunks of hardwood (I had a chunk of mahogany and oak laying around that didn't need much work to get them to fit).

It sounds pretty much like a hardtail and I love having the fine tuners. They work better than any other tuners I've tried.
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#7
when I was around 16 I didn't know much about floyd roses and so I blocked my floyd rose with pennies. I got a slight bit more sustain but I hate the S word so much when speaking about guitars.

I tell people there is right ways to do it and wrong ways. The wrong way I remember my friend used these parts off a crib or something and this Hamer 27 fret on my page would hold tune for 2 weeks if that assuming I don't play it. Without his contraption I could play or not play it for a month on and off and it held tune way better.

as a suggestion for the future try Kahler tremolos. They do everything a floyd rose does. But the bridge locks with the twist of an allen key.. that and adjusting to different tunings doesn't require any adjustments compared to a floyd rose.
#8
No expert, just about to buy my first FR guitar soon. But an original Floyd is pretty expensive, I think. The cheaper licensed ones are often of poor quality if I understand that right. For example, I tried that EVH Wolfgang at the store, it had a licensed FR but even though more expensive than Charvels and Jacksons with original FR, it instantly went out of tune when I used the trem (Jackson and Charvel stayed in tune no matter how I abused them). Must be mentioned though that the EVH Floyd is a heavily modified (probably unique) version. I don't know if quality of the system affects blocked performance somehow, but I'm a bit cautious if it's so bad at what it's supposed to do.

I heard people say that a FR gives a slightly brighter/more metallic tone compared to fixed bridge, but didn't check that out myself.
Last edited by Knarrenheino at Jan 3, 2015,
#9
Quote by Tallwood13


as a suggestion for the future try Kahler tremolos. They do everything a floyd rose does. But the bridge locks with the twist of an allen key.. that and adjusting to different tunings doesn't require any adjustments compared to a floyd rose.


Never tried a Kahler (going to next time in the shop), heard lots of good things about it, many advantages over a Floyd. Kerry King and Jeff Hanneman of Slayer use(d) Kahlers instead of the usual Floyds on their guitar models, and they are/were pretty enthusiastic trem users. But what about heavy bendings? They say it tends to get slightly out of tune when bending. Not taking anything for granted, I'd just like to know your opinion on that.
Last edited by Knarrenheino at Jan 3, 2015,
#10
Quote by dannyalcatraz
My first thought is that you tend to pay a little bit more for a guitar with a quality tremolo to start off, then add whatever it costs you to properly block it. Let's call it an additional $150-200?

That's a pedal.


well, not really, for example the jackson dinky pro series is the same price if i get it with or without the floyd rose, i just have to pick another colour lol. same thing with the mh/h series from ltd. And the piece of wood to block it wouldn't cost to much either.

Since this would be my only guitar, i thought i could get the best from both worlds if i bought the one with floyd rose because i have the option to have it blocked or not.

can't decide... i guess i just gonna have to take the risk since i can't get one borrowed.
#11
Quote by Knarrenheino
No expert, just about to buy my first FR guitar soon. But an original Floyd is pretty expensive, I think. The cheaper licensed ones are often of poor quality if I understand that right. For example, I tried that EVH Wolfgang at the store, it had a licensed FR but even though more expensive than Charvels and Jacksons with original FR, it instantly went out of tune when I used the trem (Jackson and Charvel stayed in tune no matter how I abused them). Must be mentioned though that the EVH Floyd is a heavily modified (probably unique) version. I don't know if quality of the system affects blocked performance somehow, but I'm a bit cautious if it's so bad at what it's supposed to do.

I heard people say that a FR gives a slightly brighter/more metallic tone compared to fixed bridge, but didn't check that out myself.

The Floyd on the EVH is a EVH branded Korean OFR (Floyd Rose did it as a tribute to Eddie). The Bridges on the Jackon's & Charvel's you tried were also Korean OFR's, not the German made ones. So all the guitars you're talking about had the exact same Floyd's on them (FR x000's, aka Korean OFR's). So there was obviously an issue with the setup on the EVH, possibly the nut just wasn't locked tight.

@ TS:
I think every guitar should have a Floyd, so you know what my answer is.
#12
Quote by Way Cool JR.


So all the guitars you're talking about had the exact same Floyd's on them (FR x000's, aka Korean OFR's). So there was obviously an issue with the setup on the EVH, possibly the nut just wasn't locked tight.


Seemed to be locked to me, but of course as I said I have no experience with them really, so I may be wrong there. It certainly isn't the same though, at least in term of design. The EVH has a quick-drop-tune stick and can't bend upwards.
#13
Restringing is a bitch, even if its blocked.... I'm also super lazy
Gear:
Dean RC7X (Bareknuckle Coldsweat pickups)
Ibanez Rg2570Z (Bareknuckle Juggernaughts)
Schecter KM-6
Schecter Hellraiser Hybrid 7 String
Engl Powerball II
Orange PPC412
Line 6 Pod HD500X
#14
Quote by Knarrenheino
Seemed to be locked to me, but of course as I said I have no experience with them really, so I may be wrong there. It certainly isn't the same though, at least in term of design. The EVH has a quick-drop-tune stick and can't bend upwards.

That thing you're talking about is called the D-Tuna. It is a device that Eddie invented and it can be installed on any non floating Floyd made to OFR specs. You can purchase them by themselves for around $35. Since it's an EVH guitar it naturally comes with one already installed. But It is a fact that it is an EVH branded Korean OFR made by Floyd Rose.
#15
If you are NOT lazy and you care to put in the work, get the FR. It's sort of hard to top.
#16
Quote by Way Cool JR.
That thing you're talking about is called the D-Tuna. It is a device that Eddie invented and it can be installed on any non floating Floyd made to OFR specs. You can purchase them by themselves for around $35. Since it's an EVH guitar it naturally comes with one already installed. But It is a fact that it is an EVH branded Korean OFR made by Floyd Rose.


Ah ok, thanks. But all three had massive fret buzz on the low E string. None on the other strings, but massive buzz over all frets on the E6. Didn't seem like a neck bend problem to me since it was on all frets. It was less pronounced on the Jackson, but action wasn't particularly low on either of them, seemed even higher than my own string-through Jackson which doesn't have any fret buzz problems at all. None of my guitars has that problem actually.

Is there something with the Floyd that may cause this, or are they just incidentally all flawed in the same way? Also, can you raise the action of a Floyd on just one side like with a Tune-o-matic bridge (Gibson/HT Jackson)?
Last edited by Knarrenheino at Jan 3, 2015,
#17
As this thread indicates, we all clearly have our own opinions...this is mine:

1. I don't buy for a second that a floyd will sound noticeably different than a fixed bridge as a result of the structure or the missing wood, I've owned and used several different floyds and fixed bridges and the ones with similar pickups sounded VERY close (especially true with active pickups). Most differences people hear are placebo in my opinion.

2. In my experience; every non-locking tuner fixed bridge I've owned or played goes out of tune pretty quickly with bends and such...using either a locking nut or locking tuners (I prefer both) as is on a floyd stops that problem dead.
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3. The downside to floyds is you have to know how to use them or they're a nightmare. In the assumption that you aren't familiar with it, I'll tell you what I wish i knew when I got my first floyd:
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A floyd works by countering the string tension with spring tension. As such, changing tunings or string gauges will require you to adjust the string tension, which is changed by screwing in or out the spring claw, thus pulling the springs tighter, or giving them more slack. I used to use 50 gauge strings tuned to STANDARD and found that using such a thick gauge (which I had no business using) tuned to standard created too much string tension for 3 springs to counteract. I had to add a spring or else it would never tune. So keep that sort of thing in mind as you work with it. If you get the low E in tune, and tune up the A, it's going to pull the bridge (because of more tension) and the low E will drop. What I would do is get the spring tension quite high at first and get the strings close to being in tune, it's more important to get them in tune with each other than to proper pitch. Once you get it to the point that you can get all 6 together without any detuning, you can use the springs to bring the strings close to pitch and retune perfectly.

Once you find the proper spring tension for your gauge/tuning, you won't usually need to adjust it when changing strings. There's more details (and if you want help if you decide to get the floyd, PM me) but basically use practical physics to figure out why the things that are happening are happening. It will take practice and patience, but once you get the hang of it...I find them easier than fixed bridges.
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4. It's true that a guitar with a floyd is typically more expensive, but you say you're able to choose with little/no price difference...the choice for me is clear: Floyds require time investment and some common sense, but once you're over the learning curve, they have no real downside but offer the obvious benefits of a floating bridge AND superior tuning stability.

As far as cheap licensed floyds go, as long as you're buying a guitar from a 'real' company (ie not some random Chinese knockoff), they're all good. I've used Deans, Jacksons, Schecters, ESPs, etc...if properly set up..they all held tuning perfectly. Conversely, if improperly set up..nothing will save them.

As far as I'm concerned, you are correct in your assumption that a blocked floyd doesn't have a downside in comparison to a fixed bridge. Snipping the ends off of the strings takes about 5 seconds, no longer than threading through a string-though, or a tailpiece. But I would recommend you try to stick with it unblocked as much as you can, if you succeed, you will find no reason to ever use a fixed bridge again. (when I'm on one I always feel gimped, lol)

Anyway, good luck!

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Edit : I should mention that any guitar from a factory is going to come half set up already, with the spring tension either right or very close..if you're not changing gauges from standard, you won't have to adjust it much, just string as usual and if you find each consecutive string making previous ones flat: increase spring tension. You'll know you've done too much when all the string keep pulling sharp...
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TL;DR - Floyd+brain > Fixed bridge
Last edited by RestinPeaceDime at Jan 4, 2015,
#18
Yes less sustain
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#19
Quote by Knarrenheino


Is there something with the Floyd that may cause this, or are they just incidentally all flawed in the same way? Also, can you raise the action of a Floyd on just one side like with a Tune-o-matic bridge (Gibson/HT Jackson)?


I haven't noticed floyds having more buzz inherently, likely poor set up or fretwork. And the bridge studs can indeed be adjusted individually.
#20
I have a jackson dinky pro (MIJ) that for the first few years of ownership I blocked the trem. It was my first decent guitar and knowing no better I had to have a floyd (it's a lfr). I blocked it with wood and tuned it using the fine tuners.
Rock solid tuning as you'd expect.
More recently it's been unblocked and is now used as intended. It was easy to setup and the tuning is solid (as it gets with a floyd).

I like floating trems, they're comfy to play on and fun. The only downside for me is that it takes a little longer to tune when changing strings (when left floating)
Once setup and the strings have stabilised it's no worse to tune than any other guitar.

All very much IMO of course. Jackson dinkys are awesome in my book - if you think you'll need a trem at some point in future, buy a guitar with a trem. If not, buy fixed bridge.
#21
i'd probably say the Floyd rose
it's very comfortable to pal mute and you'll have a "convertable" guitar
#22
Quote by Knarrenheino
Never tried a Kahler (going to next time in the shop), heard lots of good things about it, many advantages over a Floyd. Kerry King and Jeff Hanneman of Slayer use(d) Kahlers instead of the usual Floyds on their guitar models, and they are/were pretty enthusiastic trem users. But what about heavy bendings? They say it tends to get slightly out of tune when bending. Not taking anything for granted, I'd just like to know your opinion on that.

I've known two people with significant experience with Kahlers, and both claimed that while you could do absolutely anything with the tremolo and be fine, a single bar of B.B. King would put it right out of tune. But clearly there are professionals who use them all the time, so it must be possible to make it stick well enough.
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#23
Don't be afraid of a Floyd, you can tune them very well, its a little bit similar to tuning a violin and you don't need to be perfectly on the desired note you still got fine tuners and original Floyds will never ever loose their tuning. First times it will probably make you go crazy and take hours but the more often you work with Floyds the easier and faster it gets.
#24
Blocked FR makes a better bridge than a hardtail to me, locking nut and fine tuners add to tuning stability, also you never break strings with the smooth saddles.
#25
Quote by Grawgos
I just installed a Tremol-no on my guitar. Sweet little gadget. I can lock the Floyd into a hardtail, make it dive only or leave it full floating.

No loss of sustain when in hardtail mode and I can just unlock at the nut, tune it, and then lock it back.


Wow, great tip! I'm going to look into this. I need my FR when playing shows or recording, but there are times when I'm practicing and I just don't want to have to spend all of the time getting in turn with a floating brodge. This looks like it would be perfect for me!