#1
So I've been after one of those Squier VM Jaguars for a while, and now I've finally gotten the money together I've been told that the current model is being discontinued. While I wait to find out if a more-or-less equivalent replacement is being brought in (quite likely given the offsets' popularity as far as I can tell) I'm exploring other options for nice Squiers in that kind of price range. And I'm falling a little bit in love with both the Classic Vibe 50's Strat and the Deluxe Strat. I've heard great things about both and maple fretboards are a bit of an irrational turn-on for me.

Both the CV 50's Strat and the Deluxe are the same price, but with differences in the tremolo (2-point vs. vintage-style), glossy/unglossy fretboards, the pickups ("Duncan Designed" vs. "Custom Vintage Style") and the body wood (basswood vs. alder).

Unfortunately, there's not a huge amount I can do with that info since I only understand some of that information and then only in theory. So could people help me work out the practical differences in the tremolos, pickups and body wood and if any of these make a really significant difference (i.e. if one particular feature is enough reason to completely make the decision)? Also, I guess it's kind of a bad question to ask, but is there a generally agreed overall tangible quality difference between them?

TL;DR please help me work out the key differences between the CV 50's Strat and the Deluxe Strat beyond "one seems older" and the pretty slippery glossy fretboard.
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#2
I have both of those in my shop, the CV is the better guitar. I don't really have any solid reason why, but Strats are my thing, and having played both, I would take the CV day and night.
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#3
Well i've never played either of those guitars.But in theory....The two point trem should stay in tune better wheras the vintage style trem will be pretty unusable.The custom vintage pickups will sound a little different and probably be lower output,Some people like this,It's just preference(although i'm not sure how good they are as i've never played that guitar).As for the body wood,That won't make a significant difference.Not sure about a quality comparison of these guitars though.I've heard the CV line are good.I tried a CV Tele and it seemed decent enough.Did'nt play it long enough for a proper opinion.The Deluxe i know nothing about.
Last edited by EyeballPaul at Jan 4, 2015,
#4
I think the two screw has an easier action to it. The two screw probably has better tuning stability for someone who doesn't know how to set up a Strat trem properly, but if you get a good setup they both stay in tune just as well as the other.
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#5
go alder, tried a fender showmaster which was basswood and it wasn't the same to me. I can appreciate companies trying new things as I'd like to imagine we all want new and exciting tones. The guitar didn't seem like a fender to me being basswood. That wood I have such a hatred for and don't understand how people settle with it. Ibanez guys will bite your head off for saying you dont like it but.. yeah.. the 50s classic vibe the only thing bad I can say about it was the tuners I'd swap asap. They are a bastard to re-string.

what it comes down to is basswood is too balanced
alder has some nice brightness to it
alder with a rosewood fretboard is tolerable but I like dark guitars and adding my own brightness to the woods. With this DK2M Jackson I have I'm using aluminum picks to make it sound good.

.....but as always, play both guitars. See which you like. Honestly don't worry about brand that is the least of your concerns. Go to a shop and play as many guitars as you can. Take your time and find something you love. You'd be surprised what you'll end up with sometimes. I never thought I'd like explorers or telecasters. Understanding what makes the guitar tick to sound a certain way is everything. so that being said it doesn't have to be a "winner" brand as far too many people only think Gibson, Fender and PRS can make guitars. When guys say Epiphone I say Schecter, LTD and a bunch of other companies along those lines. Yes LTD does have strats and teles. alder is alder, mahogany is mahogany. Not every guitar sounds the same so specs are just expectation.
#6
Tallwood, you're nuts. The Fender Vintage Tuners are awesome, many people will get rid of their regular tuners for the locking action of the vintage one. Also, the quality of basswood/alder in those Squiers makes the wood difference negligible. The difference in woods of these guitars are almost non-factors and it'd be silly to make a choice based on that.
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Last edited by JustRooster at Jan 4, 2015,
#7
Tallwood is like the new Topscore around here
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#8
Quote by Tallwood13
.....but as always, play both guitars. See which you like. Honestly don't worry about brand that is the least of your concerns. Go to a shop and play as many guitars as you can. Take your time and find something you love. You'd be surprised what you'll end up with sometimes. I never thought I'd like explorers or telecasters. Understanding what makes the guitar tick to sound a certain way is everything. so that being said it doesn't have to be a "winner" brand as far too many people only think Gibson, Fender and PRS can make guitars. When guys say Epiphone I say Schecter, LTD and a bunch of other companies along those lines. Yes LTD does have strats and teles. alder is alder, mahogany is mahogany. Not every guitar sounds the same so specs are just expectation.

Thanks for the feedback, just want to say in response to this part that I already have two humbucker'd electrics, and overall this'll be my seventh instrument (sixth if you ignore the Affinity Strat I no longer own), so while I'm open to new ideas in theory, the Strat is the gap in my arsenal I'm most interested in filling (after the Jag).

As it is I'm afraid I'm going to go with the "wood doesn't matter that much" viewpoint on this Nonetheless, the Classic Vibe seems like the better buy to me at the moment. As for the tuners, I'm assuming the issue is that they're of the stick-the-string-in-the-hole-in-the-top variety? Because I adore those things

Regardless, any further feedback or useful info would be appreciated
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#9
They're very similar, it might just come down to whether you want a 2- or 6-point trem, or if you particularly want one in Sherwood Green (CV) or Daphne Blue (Deluxe). The tuners are as good a reason as any to get the CV if you prefer them.

I wouldn't worry about the pickups, they're "just ok" in both models and you'll probably want to upgrade them eventually.

Honestly if you are having a hard time choosing I'd just pick whichever one you can find cheaper and spend the extra money on pickups.

It would be very odd for it to only happen on the low input, but I suppose it's not impossible that this is a tube failure in V1. I would still suspect the jack first, but it's worth swapping the tube just to make sure.
#10
I have a CV 60s rather than a 50s (I prefer rosewood over maple necks was the main reason for getting the 60s). I've never owned any expensive guitars but it's by far the best one I have owned. It just feels really nice to play and I actually love the sound of the stock pickups. I feel like my amp is holding back my tone much more than the pickups (having tried it at the store with both an amp similar to mine, and a Vox AC15).

Mine stays in tune really well. I can tune it at the start of a 2 hour session, then not play for a couple days. When I come back it's usually still in perfect tune or at worst very very slightly flat. I almost never use the tremolo arm though which may be part of the reason it stays in tune so well. In fact I usually play with the arm removed completely.

I agree with Tallwood that the best thing to do is go to the store and play/hear them yourself though. A lot of it really comes down to your personal preferences. Even guitars that are the same model are never quite identical either (although a lot of this has to do with the factory setup rather than anything significant).

Quote by JustRooster
Tallwood, you're nuts. The Fender Vintage Tuners are awesome, many people will get rid of their regular tuners for the locking action of the vintage one.


Yeah. I suspect many of the people who complain about them are just used to the "modern" style tuners and don't know the correct way to re-string with vintage tuners. I know the first time I tried re-stringing a guitar with vintage tuners it was really difficult, but then someone showed me how to do it properly, and now I think it's easier than the "modern" tuners.

P.S. For anyone having trouble, the key is to cut the string about 2 inches past the tuner, then put a 90 degree bend in the string so that 2 inches of string will lock into the tuner, thus avoiding it popping out.
Last edited by bptrav at Jan 4, 2015,
#12
^That doesn't work with the split-top vintage tuners on the CV. Well, I guess you could use them that way, but they lock nicely when used as intended.
#14
You don't want to see my drawing skills but:

1. Cut string two tuners' lengths past the tuner you're using.
2. Bend string 90 degrees at the end, with the short end approximately as long as the tuner is tall (but a bit shorter).
3. Put string end in vertical tuner hole
4. Wind string around; wind once on top then cross over and wind the rest so the string winds toward the bottom of the tuner.