#1
I've got about an album of songs (8). I'm a singer guitarist. There simply is no one in our town who plays bass/drums. If there are, they either have no idea how to make songs or then they are lazy as fk. Genre is Punk, pop punk. Is it possible to record a demo alone as a singer guitarist and succeed with it and get a label's attention and perhaps get the rest of the required band members afterwards(drums, bass)?
#2
You can programme the bass & drums using VSTi's.

Go to the recordings forum & read all the stickies.
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#3
For all intents and purposes, all labels are dead, dried up and blown away. No one ever listens to demos anymore so you are on your own. If you want to pursue music as a business the first step is to figure out how to attract crowds of listeners to your performances. The larger the crowd who wants to hear you play, the more likely your success.

Good luck!
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#4
Quote by Cajundaddy
For all intents and purposes, all labels are dead, dried up and blown away. No one ever listens to demos anymore so you are on your own. If you want to pursue music as a business the first step is to figure out how to attract crowds of listeners to your performances. The larger the crowd who wants to hear you play, the more likely your success.

Good luck!


This is true, the old music business model of artist discovery has long since died a painful death. BUT this does not mean that you don't need a good demo. You need one to get gigs with - to send to the person who books the acts, and to attract attention on the internet.
#5
You can always record as a solo artist. Off the top of my head I'm thinking Barzum, the rocket summer, Andrew W.K. (the later two have a live band). I've recorded projects / ideas and I have had several friends succeed in establishing solo projects. Recording is a breeze, you're only limited by your own brain, your equipment, etc. Live - you have to find some solutions but it's nothing that hasn't been figured out already.

I suggest you refocus your strategy though. You are going to be far more successful if you record a demo / E.P. and put it out into the world. You can use this to recruit members, not a label. Not sure what your music community is like...but in my experience having 3 or 4 full complete songs will lure other musicians on its own merit.

P.S.P.S.: if your ultimate goal is having label support, I ask you to think about what "support" it is you want from a label. Don't be blinded by the big shots riding in a bus.
#6
Quote by PSimonR
This is true, the old music business model of artist discovery has long since died a painful death. BUT this does not mean that you don't need a good demo. You need one to get gigs with - to send to the person who books the acts, and to attract attention on the internet.


Maybe. Most places out here don't even care what you sound like and never ask for demos. They only have 2 questions: Do you have 50 friends who will show up if we book you? Do they drink... a lot? Yes? You are booked for this Fri and Sat night. Congratulations!

Sad but very true.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#8
You tube well get you jobs no need for record label no one makes. no one makes money on a label.hell there's people make more money playing on the weekends.
#9
Advice here is good, moving it to the recording forum.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#10
Well uh, being at the age of 17 there isn't much I can do. Like I can't go to bars etc. Like most of the newcomers do. Like, where should I start from? But I do think that I've got some neat stuff and I bet that if a label or someone with the ability to support me by giving advertising to my band noticed (heard my songs), I'd succeed. Perhaps it sounds a bit too confident but that's what I think. Everything written by me is diverse.
Last edited by Billie_J at Jan 6, 2015,
#11
Quote by Billie_J
Well uh, being at the age of 17 there isn't much I can do. Like I can't go to bars etc. Like most of the newcomers do. Like, where should I start from? But I do think that I've got some neat stuff and I bet that if a label or someone with the ability to support me by giving advertising to my band noticed (heard my songs), I'd succeed. Perhaps it sounds a bit too confident but that's what I think. Everything written by me is diverse.


Youtube is your friend. Once you get about 10 million hits, someone will notice. That is how Bieber got discovered. Understand that a recording contract is a double-edged sword that becomes overwhelming to many.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Jan 6, 2015,
#12
Well. In my country recording a demo and sending it to a label doesn't sound that complicated. It's different in other countries which are bigger but the smaller the population the bigger the chance of being noticed. But again I wonder if it is possible to success with a demo in a label with my situation. And previously it was suggested to use a program for bass and drums. No, I highly doubt they sound good. And then again YouTube, my recording devices suck. And even if I managed to make a video, nobody would notice it if you don't already have like 20000 subscribers.

Sucks to live in this small town.
#13
Quote by Billie_J
Well. In my country recording a demo and sending it to a label doesn't sound that complicated. It's different in other countries which are bigger but the smaller the population the bigger the chance of being noticed. But again I wonder if it is possible to success with a demo in a label with my situation. And previously it was suggested to use a program for bass and drums. No, I highly doubt they sound good. And then again YouTube, my recording devices suck. And even if I managed to make a video, nobody would notice it if you don't already have like 20000 subscribers.

Sucks to live in this small town.


You still have choices. You can collaborate with someone who has the tools and talent to make a good youtube vid. Or you can give up and accept defeat. Randomly sending demos to what is left of record companies does not work unless:

A. They specifically asked you for one.

B. You are regularly selling out shows in your home town.

If you are regularly filling halls with screaming fans they want to talk to you.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#14
Well first pop punk is pretty much dead as a genre...

I've done projects where I've paid for drums on demand over the internet, it is possible to do it that way.

There are also music collaboration sites, like Riffworld, Groovezoo and other that you can utilize for finding musicians, also local studios in your town will probably have a way to get you session musicians if needed. Call around and ask for rates.
#15
A little true story. Many moons ago I was in a band. We got signed to a label. We were a rock/metal band. The label didn't care what we played. The big band at the time on the same label was Right Said Fred. The day we went to sign the deal at their offices in Islington, London I saw a guy sitting at his desk with about 10 mailbags full of CD's. I wandered over for a chat and he said he received that many every day. I asked him how the hell he picked our CD out from so many and he replied " It depends on how I feel on the day as to what I decide to listen to. The rest go straight in the bin. If a bus is in my way on the way to work I might just look for covers with buses on. If someone brings me tea in a blue mug, I might just look for blue covers, You need to decide what to filter out and stick with it." I asked him again how he picked ours and he said your label logo had a frog on it, our logo is a frog, so it went in the yes pile. Nothing to do with promotion, fanbase, content. It's just luck. If you get picked out because you're lucky and singing in tune, anything can happen. We actually sucked pretty bad but we still got signed to a biggish label because of a frog.
My gastronomic rapacity knows no satiety.
#16
Cajundaddy is right. You need to get other musicians and play live so you can create an audience for your music. Record companies aren't dead yet but they are on life support. Today a record company is more about distribution and getting paid by consumers than looking for and nurturing talent. The one thing a record label won't accept these days is a poorly made demo. Really good artists with followings are flooding them with well made, well played, professionally recorded projects and that is your competition. A home demo is fine for working out songs and attracting other musicians to work with but even iTunes and CD Baby has standards (low as they are). Even club owners these days are not impressed by well-made demos. This is where Cajundaddy hit the nail on the head perfectly. You may find extremely rare examples of an artist that actually “made it” without being a good live act first but that would be a one in a million. You need to play live and the first thing a prospective club owner will ask is “Do you have a following”? To a club owner, you and your band represent a music “product” that they hope will put asses on their bar stools. You can play heavy metal Jamaican polka music for all they care as long as you bring in new customers. Record companies are right there also. They want to know if you have established an following before they talk to you or listen to anything you have recorded.

One thing I learned a long time ago is that many record companies and music publishers have a hard and fast rule. They do not accept unsolicited material. This is because they have a fear (rightly so) of being accused of stealing songs, lyrics or ideas from artists that mail in material that they did not ask for ahead of time. Unsolicited material goes from the mailroom to the garbage can unopened that way if anyone tries to sue a record company or publisher they can prove that they have a strict company wide policy to never open material they did not ask to be sent to them by previous arrangement. This may be a US only thing because this country is so sue crazy.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Jan 7, 2015,