#1
Does anyone have any suggestions for a good microphone for recording band practices? This is just for practice purposes and it does not need to be flawless. The problem I'm running into now is cell phones just can't handle the extremely loud volumes.
#2
A half nice handled recording, say the zoom H1, would probably be good enough.
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#3
Quote by Spambot_2
A half nice handled recording, say the zoom H1, would probably be good enough.


Agreed. This (or something similar) would probably be your best bet.
#5
This is a rehearsal recoding from last year on a Zoom H1. Not enough vocals in the mix but you can hear the band pretty well and it is not overloaded. I use the H1 a lot but rarely save the recordings.

https://soundcloud.com/dave-hockett/btb-wild/s-Qds7h
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#8
Just about any decent mic will do. SM57/58, condenser, as long as you can pad it down enough so you don't overload your inputs. A little experimentation with placement and you are golden.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#9
Quote by Cajundaddy
Just about any decent mic will do. NOT AN SM57/58, condenser, as long as you can pad it down enough so you don't overload your inputs. A little experimentation with placement and you are golden.

FTFY

Most condensers will work okay, an omni in a fairly central position or a pair of cardioid condensers are ideal. A cardioid dynamic like the 57/58 won't have the sensitivity to pick it up well, they're designed specifically to catch as little as possible other than whatever is close and directly in front of them (and to be able to be dropped out of a helicopter, driven over by a truck and still be usable for the next few decades but that's beside the point).
#10
Quote by chatterbox272
FTFY

Most condensers will work okay, an omni in a fairly central position or a pair of cardioid condensers are ideal. A cardioid dynamic like the 57/58 won't have the sensitivity to pick it up well, they're designed specifically to catch as little as possible other than whatever is close and directly in front of them (and to be able to be dropped out of a helicopter, driven over by a truck and still be usable for the next few decades but that's beside the point).


Pure internet mythology nonsense. I have recorded rehearsals and live performances for 30 years with dynamic mics and they work just fine. Go to the Shure website and have a long look at the actual pickup pattern for the mic. It works great from the front and sides while only muting sound directly behind it. Try it yourself sometime just for kicks and grins.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#11
I second a dynamic mic (preferably two in a stereo technique). Condensers might be too sensitive to record something like a live rehearsal.