#1
Do you think that if I had recorded a really good album (I haven't, I'm just interested to know). And by good I mean one that a lot of people would like. Let's say it would be top ten if released by a major label. If I released this on iTunes, Spotify etc with CDBaby and ran some basic advertising (on Facebook and other a few others) could it be successful? And by successful I don't necessarily mean top ten but successful enough to be relatively well known among people who know music.
#2
Depends on a whole stack of factors, one of the major ones being sheer luck. Realistically though, it's pretty unlikely.
#3
Quote by gunnersandmash
Do you think that if I had recorded a really good album (I haven't, I'm just interested to know). And by good I mean one that a lot of people would like. Let's say it would be top ten if released by a major label. If I released this on iTunes, Spotify etc with CDBaby and ran some basic advertising (on Facebook and other a few others) could it be successful? And by successful I don't necessarily mean top ten but successful enough to be relatively well known among people who know music.


With basic advertising? No way in hell.

But with A LOT of hard work and marketing skills, then yes, you feasibly could.
#4
If you plan on doing it yourself you will need to do a lot of homework which you should do anyway if you are serious about creating a commercial release. Do you know anything about publishing, royalty rates, distribution costs (iTunes, CD Baby and others are paid services), are you registered with a performance rights organization like BMI or ASCAP, do you know how to register a copyright for your material, do you need to form a business (LLC or other) for tax purposes? These and a lot of other things are just the starting point of a real commercial “do it yourself”. Don't get me wrong, this is not to discourage you but just make you aware that you need more than desire and talent. Go to a library and get a book like “This Business of Music” or pick it up at a book store like Barnes and Nobles. It’s only about $25.00 and it’s a good starting point.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Jan 6, 2015,
#6
If you can push it hard enough financially...possibly. I had friends that were on MTV at the time and still didn't make it, some of them even owe 1/4 mil. to record co's and work at Guitar Center at this point selling strings and cables.
#7
Can you attract a large audience of listeners everywhere you play now? If yes then you've got a shot. It would have to be professionally recorded and not a bedroom laptop product for sure. Also think about who is actually buying music now. Would your music appeal to them?

If you don't know the answers to these questions you have little chance of $$ success with a recording.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#8
It can happen, I know Enter Shikari were very successful when they first started out and they had no label backing really, it was the do it yourself approach they took. They are backed by a label now but I think that has to do with the amount of fans they have as would be too much for them to do alone
#9
I really can't answer that for you man but I was thinking the same thing. In my opinion the album would have to be so damn good that it defines this generation. If you could be the next Hendrix and release an independent album all by yourself... people might actually support you and buy it.

On the other hand who can be the next Hendrix? Sure there is lots of good stuff to be heard. The problem is, what do guys like us do when we release an album and nobody is buying albums anymore? People very rarely buy albums. Sure some might pay 99 cents for mp3s on itunes but most guys would rather just stream it for free or download it for free somewhere else.

The fact that it is digital means it can become erased and that scares me as an artist but that is just how it is. I blame Napster for everything though. I didn't understand back then before I was writing but now I get it.

You need to ask yourself what is success? Is success selling one million mp3s on itunes or is it getting heard by twenty million people on the internet but still not earning income? If you don't care at all about making money on the music I would just promote and work with the team over at Pirate Bay. Though that seems like career suicide for an up and coming artist who wants to make music for a living. Maybe success these days is just getting heard and pumping gas for a living. That is up to you to figure out for yourself. Sorry to sound so negative.
#10
Worry about actually making music before you worry about whether you'll make it big or not.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#11
There is a lot of shit out there. There are a lot of people that like music based on how it reflects on them from a social group standpoint.

Some people are highly influenced by authorities on the subject, like radio making something officially good. But also 99% of all amateur music you would come across is either very poor, or not your style. So, nobody wants to sift through it all.

Put it this way. Would you be interested in hearing new music you love? Of course you would, that would be awesome. But do you often find yourself browsing soundcloud to find it? Probably not, because there would be so much garbage you would have to go through.

You could maybe make it with some advertising, but really, I think you need traction in a community. So live shows, and stuff like that. You need to be good, and people need to hear you.

Although if your recording was really pro level, and your music really top notch, and your ads very professional, and you used advertising that targeted demographics that would be interested in your style of music, I think it would definitely be effective. It would be a good step in the right direction, but it wouldn't be time to retire by a long shot.

That's what I believe. But I'm not a wealthy indy artist, so idk for sure.

But quality music is definitely necessary. Some people like to think that money makes success of any artist, but that's not true. If it was, then every track every artist with big label money released, would be a hit.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Jan 7, 2015,
#12
Quote by fingrpikingood
There is a lot of shit out there. There are a lot of people that like music based on how it reflects on them from a social group standpoint.

Some people are highly influenced by authorities on the subject, like radio making something officially good. But also 99% of all amateur music you would come across is either very poor, or not your style. So, nobody wants to sift through it all.


I agree with this. The good part of the internet age of music distribution is that anyone, anywhere, can post their music on the web. The bad thing is the same thing: anyone, anywhere, can post anything even if it sucks on sites like Souncloud etc. There's a ton of homemade garbage out there. In times gone by there were professional people who reviewed stuff before it was mass marketed. While that often worked as a filter to weed out the real crap it also often acted as filter that weeded out some really good stuff that established industry people didn't want to promote, didn't understand and buried it. I doubt that there are any real music industry people who wade through Soundcloud or YouTube type sites looking for acts to sign and promote. They hear the buzz about some act that is packing them in at Club XYZ, opened for some name acts and has sold 10,000 copies of their own CD at their shows and on CD Baby. If you can generate that kind of buzz, someone with a contract will be knocking on your door. Untill then it's just teen dreams and boosting your ego by posting half assed songs and poorly made demos.

I know how harsh that sounds but thats my biased opinion.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Jan 7, 2015,
#13
If it was that easy, then everyone would be doing it. ;-)

Lots of good points above, though. You have to consider how YOU find new music. If YOU saw an ad for "Check out the New Amazing Release for Doom-tasikk!!", would you click on it? I don't click on ads, unless it is a specific product that I'm already looking for.

I'll venture to say that any ad campaign is going to go largely ignored without something else to drive it. People need to talk about you and share you on social media. That drives the "interest" metrics. More interest generates more interest. You'll click on the ad because three friends of yours showed up in your Facebook feed as "Joey Williams likes Doom-tastikk." Then you see an ad for them. You still ignore it. Then you hear they are coming to your town supporting another bigger band that you and your friends all like. Then your Facebook feed shows "Bonnie Billings likes Doom-tastikk" and then finally, you click on something because now you're actually curious about who they are. Now you have a reason to care. Now they're not just another one of a zillion other faceless and nameless bands out there.

In music, ads are just a reminder that you're out there for those who already know about you. In and of themselves, they don't inform a potential buyer of a great new product they should try. At least not effectively. The sort-of exception to that is that, with repeated exposure, will generate some level of name recognition. After seeing the ad and ignoring it twenty times, you'll see the name pop up somewhere else and think to yourself, "Gee, I've heard of them. They must be up to something pretty good."

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.