#1
If I am using an E minor backing track Can I solo over it in E minor Lydian or a mix of E minor Lydian and the natrual E minor scale - ?
#2
In a nutshell No because it's a major scale you could use G major Lydian,because G is the relative Major to E minor. But you could use E dorain or E Phygain or The natural minor for some added 'spice' watch this skip to 2:02
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=OkaqfgSqtHg

Hope it helps!
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Last edited by Guitar137335 at Jan 7, 2015,
#3
Quote by dazzzer30
If I am using an E minor backing track Can I solo over it in E minor Lydian or a mix of E minor Lydian and the natrual E minor scale - ?


There is no "minor Lydian" mode.

If the backing track has Amaj or A7 (A9) etc, or Em6, then E Dorian is a good choice.

If it has A min or Am7 (Am9), then E Aeolian or E harmonic minor are good choices.

(E HM especially good if it has B7, and E Aeolian if Bm(7) present).

cheers, Jerry
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Jan 7, 2015,
#5
Quote by dazzzer30
If I am using an E minor backing track Can I solo over it in E minor Lydian or a mix of E minor Lydian and the natrual E minor scale - ?


In terms of note choice... you can do whatever the hell you like, there's no 'harmony police' going to come and arrest you if you go outside of the key.

In theory terms... whatever you do, you're in E minor. You might use whatever methods you can think of to arrive at the notes you want to use but it's all accidental to the key of E minor.
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#7
What notes will sound good is determined by the chords you are playing over. Over some chord progressions many scales can work and over some chord progressions only one scale will work.

If it's just one chord, let's say Em, you can play almost anything over it, as long as you outline the chord.

Another Guthrie video from the same series:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z9Hg4JdwMMg


But seriously, I don't think you are ready for this yet. You don't know what you are doing. First you need to understand chord progressions and keys. Sometimes in the key of E minor the E minor scale won't work over all chords. Sometimes you need to add accidentals. You need to look at the chords. You need to know what key the chords belong to. So learn about that before just randomly starting to play random scales over random chords. That's not how it works.


TL;DR
It depends on the chords you are playing over. Look at the chord tones and build your scale based on them. That way you can be sure what you play will fit the chords you are playing over.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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#8
All the advice here is good. There is no "major/minor Lydian". It's just Lydian.

Technically you can play whatever you want, but for now you should stick to E minor and the key you are in until you get a larger handle on what's going on. If you want, post the chord progression and we can talk strategy.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

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#9
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
In terms of note choice... you can do whatever the hell you like, there's no 'harmony police' going to come and arrest you if you go outside of the key.

In theory terms... whatever you do, you're in E minor. You might use whatever methods you can think of to arrive at the notes you want to use but it's all accidental to the key of E minor.


I almost rose to the bait, but this has been done to death earlier! I will say I don't agree.

cheers, Jerry
#10
^ It depends on the chords you are playing over. If the chords are in the key of E minor (and let's say the chords don't use any accidentals) and you play the chromatic scale over it, you are still playing in the key of E minor (or actually technically you are playing "out of key" but you are still in the key of E minor - well, that sounded pretty strange).

I agree with you if there's no chord background. But you can't really make an E minor chord progression like i-iv-V-i to sound like it's not in the key of E minor. Play hypolydian over it and it will still sound like E minor (and your note choice will most likely sound pretty bad).
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Jan 8, 2015,
#11
Quote by Jet Penguin
Technically you can play whatever you want, but for now you should stick to E minor and the key you are in until you get a larger handle on what's going on. If you want, post the chord progression and we can talk strategy.

The danger with this is...as Maggara said, TS doesn't sound ready for the bolded.

TS, I suggest you study the following lessons, all of which will help you understand chord construction and chord progressions:
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/40 -- "Introduction to Chords": In regards to this one, I'm sure you "think" you know it. But it's good review and works well with the rest. If you really know it, it should go fast for you.
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/42 -- "Triad Inversion": This comes into play a lot with "slash chords" (for example: D/A).
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/45 -- "Seventh chords"
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/48 -- "More Seventh chords"
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/47 -- "Seventh chord inversion" Think D7/A.
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/43 -- "Diatonic chords"
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/45 -- "Roman numeral analysis of Diatonic chords"
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/46 -- "Diatonic seventh chords"
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/49 -- "Roman numeral analysis of Diatonic seventh chords"
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/50 -- "Composing with Minor Scales"
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/51 -- "Voicing Chords": This one should help you understand how a lot of composers/songwriters think and give you a bit of insight into what sounds good with what.


That'll be enough to get you started.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Jan 8, 2015,
#12
Quote by ouchies
I guess you could do some weird E minor scale with a #4, M6 and M7.

It's like... E melodic minor with a #4.


Scales like that are very common in a lot of traditional Eastern European folk music. For example, Ukrainian music commonly uses a scale that goes 1, 2, b3, #4, 5, 6, 7... which would be what you are describing. Ukrainian music also tends to be fairly liberal with the flattening of the 6 and 7 in such a case as well. Such scales are also very common in Hungarian and Romanian folk music as well as Klezmer.
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#13
Quote by theogonia777
Scales like that are very common in a lot of traditional Eastern European folk music. For example, Ukrainian music commonly uses a scale that goes 1, 2, b3, #4, 5, 6, 7... which would be what you are describing. Ukrainian music also tends to be fairly liberal with the flattening of the 6 and 7 in such a case as well. Such scales are also very common in Hungarian and Romanian folk music as well as Klezmer.


That's cool. Good to know.
#14
That Ukrainian scale is the 4th mode of Harmonic Major, often named (named awkwardly):

Melodic Minor #4, Or Lydian Diminished

It's common in a lot of modern jazz tunes as well, we tend to use it to improv over a min/maj7 chord we feel like slapping a #11 on.

A lot of those "exotic scales" can be rationalized as derivations of the main scale systems used in Western Music.

Disclaimer: I am not claiming that the origins of said sounds are Western in nature, only that they can be thought of in relation to that system, and that said system accounts for "exotic" and synthetic scales as such.

I also wouldn't use it over an E minor backing track. A static Em chord, maybe.

Also Sam's right. You need to start with the very basics before getting into more colorful sounds and whatnot.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#15
Quote by dazzzer30
If I am using an E minor backing track Can I solo over it in E minor Lydian or a mix of E minor Lydian and the natrual E minor scale - ?


What is E Minor Lydian, a b3 and a #4th?

Kidding. I don't think that you are doing anything much more than a blues scale there, my friend, especially if you add a 4th - Id see the #4 as more of a b5 or a tritone, blues note etc.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jan 15, 2015,