#1
Hi, I started playing guitar about 8 months ago, however stopped playing for a month recently as i barely felt like I was improving and especially seeing how easy some people made it look, it felt like i had such a long way to go, and got disheartened. However with the new year and all (and after listening to Orion) i decided to start practicing everyday.

Does anyone know any good practices for a half beginner to do daily?

Thanks, Ollie.
Last edited by Olliethecool at Jan 7, 2015,
#3
I agree with Tazz. Justinguitar.com keeps you on point and emphasizes practicing to get better rather than simply playing the things you can already play.
#4
What has helped me to get back into it is simply focus on how cool the instrument is and how much fun I can have with it. I'm tying to focus on the thoughts and attitudes that help me to pick up the instrument every day, even for 20 minutes.
A big part of being successful ( at anything really) is having a good relationship with yourself, learning what works for you and not be harsh when you can't learn as fast as others. Who says I have to play like Mamlsteen or I'm worthless? I'm against any mentality or school of thought that makes guitar seem so challenging that it becomes unpleasant.

Set small goals and be sure to have a way to measure your progress. Maybe write down a schedule with a deadline. Hey, whatever works!
Last edited by metal_mermaid at Jan 9, 2015,
#5
Well you do have a long way to go - those guys who make it look easy have been playing a heck of a lot longer than 8 months Like the old saying goes "You can't enjoy the journey if your eyes are always fixed on the destination." You've got to enjoy playing at your current level and take pride in the little achievements you're constantly making; not worry about how you compare to somebody who's been playing 20 times longer than you have.

I've always learned from book / CD method type instructional packs. Get a variety of them in a style you're interested in and see which one you like best. The good ones will give you a nice rounded education including rhythm. lead and a bit of theory. And they usually have a nice progression from easy to hard songs. My favorites will teach you some techniques and then give you a song to learn which employs those techniques. You can see yourself progressing and it gives you a great feeling of accomplishment when you complete the book.
#6
Quote by metal_mermaid
What has helped me to get back into it is simply focus on how cool the instrument is and how much fun I can have with it. I'm tying to focus on the thoughts and attitudes that help me to pick up the instrument every day, even for 20 minutes.
A big part of being successful ( at anything really) is having a good relationship with yourself, learning what works for you and not be harsh when you can learn as fast as others. Who says I have to play like Mamlsteen or I'm worthless? I'm against any mentality or school of thought that makes guitar seem so challenging that it becomes unpleasant.

Set small goals and be sure to have a way to measure your progress. Maybe write down a schedule with a deadline? Hey, whatever works!

The problem I'm having at the moment is that I set myself a target e.g learn enter sandman, and i start, learn some of the main riffs but I always hit a brick wall where my skills aren't good enough, and I feel like I'm not progressing.

I have lots of fun when I start playing/practising but most days I think that im not going to progress and struggle to pick up and practise, I need to find s way to keep motivated but I don't know how.
#7
Quote by Jack Strat
Well you do have a long way to go - those guys who make it look easy have been playing a heck of a lot longer than 8 months Like the old saying goes "You can't enjoy the journey if your eyes are always fixed on the destination." You've got to enjoy playing at your current level and take pride in the little achievements you're constantly making; not worry about how you compare to somebody who's been playing 20 times longer than you have.

I've always learned from book / CD method type instructional packs. Get a variety of them in a style you're interested in and see which one you like best. The good ones will give you a nice rounded education including rhythm. lead and a bit of theory. And they usually have a nice progression from easy to hard songs. My favorites will teach you some techniques and then give you a song to learn which employs those techniques. You can see yourself progressing and it gives you a great feeling of accomplishment when you complete the book.

Do you have any tips on enjoying my current level because right now I feel like I can barely play. I have a book already, just a beginners one and I intend to start it, it's just getting the motivation and daily practice that I still need to do.
#8
In all honesty there's no reason you should enjoy it, at least not this early on. It's almost like a test, if you can't stick this part out then you're maybe not really cut out for playing the guitar in the long term.

Think about learning to drive - being able to drive is great, but I don't know many people who actually enjoyed their first few driving lessons. They're frustrating, awkward, embarrassing even. And that's simply what happens when you start trying to do something you don't know how to do.

If you keep looking off into the distance complaring yourself to people who've already gone through those difficult times and are reaping the rewards you'll never get anywhere. There's no instant gratification with the guitar, it does take time and effort - possibly more than people realise. The first few months are the hardest, but you need to focus on what you CAN do, not what you can't. You're never going to be busting through a solo in the first few weeks, but you can learn a few chords and learn some simple songs that use them. You have to set yourself realistic, achievable short-term goals...if you keep worrying about the endgame it'll never happen.
Actually called Mark!

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#9
Quote by Olliethecool
Do you have any tips on enjoying my current level because right now I feel like I can barely play. I have a book already, just a beginners one and I intend to start it, it's just getting the motivation and daily practice that I still need to do.


I would actually recommend playing a mix of songs that you can already play and also trying to play some stuff that is currently beyond your ability. Mixing in some songs you can already play just makes the whole experience a lot more fun, and if you are having fun then you'll always have motivation to practice. After all the reason most of us starting playing guitar was to PLAY SONGS.

Theoretically you'd probably improve faster by only trying to play harder and harder stuff, but most people get burnt out doing that, and you won't be improving at all if you burn out and stop playing.

When learning harder songs I think it's also important to gauge how far above your ability they are too, and pick songs that are not way above your ability. You aren't going to burst straight into playing John Petrucci or Marty Friedman solos right away no matter how much you practice them.

I also can't recommend Justinguitar.com enough. He is an amazing teacher and makes the whole experience much more fun and light-hearted than a dry textbook (or even most instructors to be honest)
#10
Quote by bptrav
I would actually recommend playing a mix of songs that you can already play and also trying to play some stuff that is currently beyond your ability. Mixing in some songs you can already play just makes the whole experience a lot more fun, and if you are having fun then you'll always have motivation to practice. After all the reason most of us starting playing guitar was to PLAY SONGS.

Theoretically you'd probably improve faster by only trying to play harder and harder stuff, but most people get burnt out doing that, and you won't be improving at all if you burn out and stop playing.

When learning harder songs I think it's also important to gauge how far above your ability they are too, and pick songs that are not way above your ability. You aren't going to burst straight into playing John Petrucci or Marty Friedman solos right away no matter how much you practice them.

I also can't recommend Justinguitar.com enough. He is an amazing teacher and makes the whole experience much more fun and light-hearted than a dry textbook (or even most instructors to be honest)

Thanks for the response, i've started doing the beginners course on justinguitar, but i don't know where to really enter since i'm not an absolute beginner, but i'm not great either.

Currently i cant actually play any songs all the way through... i just learnt the main riffs of songs i like, but ill try learning the entirety of the easier ones.

How would you gauge ability of a song btw? i cant really tell till i try?

thanks for the response!
#11
Learn the whole song this will make u better in the long run and learn easy rock songs.
There tons of videos on you tube, I started 2 months ago I enjoy it,but its tough learning.
But I will never quit
#12
Quote by Olliethecool

Thanks for the response, i've started doing the beginners course on justinguitar, but i don't know where to really enter since i'm not an absolute beginner, but i'm not great either.


One good way to gauge where to start might be to look at the "beginners consolidation" test: http://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-199-Consolidation.php He has a list of all the things you should be comfortable with before moving onto the intermediate course. If you can't do something on that list, then find that lesson and practice it until you are comfortable with it.

His intermediate course has a similar "consolidation" lesson at the end, which tells you all the stuff you should know before moving onto other lessons: http://www.justinguitar.com/en/IM-160-FoundationConsolidation.php

It honestly probably wouldn't hurt to just start from the beginning either. I played guitar for years when I was younger (didn't play for about 10 years until last year when I picked it up again) and there were still a lot of insights and tricks he taught me that I never knew before.


Quote by Olliethecool

How would you gauge ability of a song btw? i cant really tell till i try?


Trying is the best way really. Eventually you'll be able to just look at a tab and gauge how difficult it will be to some extent too.

There is no set rule, but generally speaking if I can't play a riff at 50% speed within a half hour or so of practicing it, then it's probably just beyond my ability for the time being. I would make note of what it is that you found difficult though, and try to practice that technique in other ways.

If you are struggling with the strumming pattern for example, try working on that, if you are struggling skipping strings, work on that, if you are struggling getting your bends right, work on that, etc
#13
One of the best ways to gauge if you'll be able to tackle a song is simply to listen to it. If you can hear what's going on and pick out the guitar parts then you shouldn't have too much difficulty learning it. However if there's parts that are too fast or complex for you to clearly hear what's going on then you'll have even more trouble trying to play it.

Likewise looking at a tab can sometimes work as a ready reckoner, if it looks overwhelming then it probably will be.
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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#14
Hey, thanks for all the responses, i was hoping the UG forum would be as good as this and im sure i'll be back with problems in the future.

I must ask though, things like tapping your foot while playing, do they just come in time?
Last edited by Olliethecool at Jan 11, 2015,