#1
I want to write music down and analyze it, I am starting of with a simple melody supported by chords. but I have a couple of questions.

First one is something I just cannot find anything for, I can't even find the words to use for a google search. It is that the key signature, does it represent the key, or the most used accidentals? It is called a key signature. But what if my key is D minor and I use the D dorian scale over it? Would I have to write down D minor as a key signature (so, 1 flat) or do I write down the key signature of C major (no sharps, which would be equivalent to the D dorian scale)?

How do I write down the speed of a bend? And how long the bended note will stay?
#2
Both ways work on the key signature. The more traditional and conservative way would be that the key signature represents the key, not the commonly used accidentals. If you think it more practical to do it the other way then you can. Modal key signatures (like using the key signature with one sharp to represent A Dorian for example) aren't totally out of the norm, but as always check and see if you're missing the forest for the trees and are actually just in a key, not a mode.
#4
What JRF said. Standard practice is to use the KEY signature and notate and modal-ness with accidentals in the actual parts, because modal key signatures are somewhat oxymoronic.

That being said, you probably aren't in a mode.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#5
The way you should notate the bend really depends on the particular bend we are talking about. If it's a slow bend, notate it so that the lower note lasts until the bent note is in tune. But if it's a fast bend, just write the bent note and a grace note before it.

And about key signatures - the key you are in is not always the key the key signature indicates. But yeah, if the melody uses the D dorian scale, you could notate it in two ways (and even if it really wasn't modal, it wouldn't really be wrong to use all naturals key signature, because as I said, the key signature doesn't always indicate the key you are in). I would prefer D minor key signature. Some others may prefer all naturals key signature because why would you write one flat in the key signature if it was actually never used in the song? But as I said, I would prefer D minor key signature because to me it is more informative.

For example this is actually in G minor but uses D minor key signature (though it does also have parts in D minor but it starts and ends in G minor):

Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Jan 9, 2015,
#6
Quote by liampje
But what if my key is D minor and I use the D dorian scale over it?

If your key is truly Dminor (read: you're not in a mode), then some of the notes of your melody could be accidentals. (In your example, the B would be an accidental.) Notate them as such.

@Maggara: The pic didn't post properly.
#7
^ fixed
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#8
Maggara,

When Bach wrote that, the concept of key signatures had not been standardized. Bach likely found that one flat gave us the smallest amount of global accidentals regardless of key.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#9
Quote by Jet Penguin
Maggara,

When Bach wrote that, the concept of key signatures had not been standardized. Bach likely found that one flat gave us the smallest amount of global accidentals regardless of key.


It comes from the old modal way of looking at keys. The minor mode was thought (not necessarily universally) to be derived from the Dorian mode (rather than Aeolian mode), so G Dorian was indicated in the key signature to denote G minor. Theorists struggled with this, whether the minor mode was properly derived from Dorian or Aeolian. Rameau actually reverses his position (in his Traite de L'harmonie), stating in one section to base the minor mode on Dorian (Re), and, in another section, to base minor mode on Aeolian (La). Bach, being the practical guy that he was, notated the piece in a conventional (at the time) way so it would be understood.
#10
Interesting. Didn't know that. I always assumed it had something to do with melodic minor. But that totally makes sense.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#12
Quote by Jet Penguin
Interesting. Didn't know that. I always assumed it had something to do with melodic minor. But that totally makes sense.


Well, melodic minor certainly is implicated (even if the term itself wasn't being used).
#13
Right, but I didn't know if that influenced the choice of key signature.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#14
I'll see if I can find the time to do it tomorrow and I'll post it up here along with the corresponding music! Think I will still make some mistakes as this is my first time notating music.
#16
It turned out to be quite hard to write it down. There's a lot of upbeat things going on.

There's a particular thing going on with this. A note is bent on the and of four and then remains bent and sound exactly the same untill the second beat of the next bar. How do I write that down?
#17
Quote by liampje
It turned out to be quite hard to write it down. There's a lot of upbeat things going on.

There's a particular thing going on with this. A note is bent on the and of four and then remains bent and sound exactly the same untill the second beat of the next bar. How do I write that down?

Depends on the speed of the bend.

You could write something like "release bend" when you want it to be released. Though I think you could assume that the bend is released after the note ends, unless it says "hold bend".
Attachments:
bend.png
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#18
This is what I got after a month of procrastinating. It's the first 2 bars. I'm not sure if I notated the tied bent correctly. (warning: huge picture, don't know how to make it smaller)

Anyways it should sound like this (starts at 0:29)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJY0u5-Xl3E
Any feedback is appreciated.
Last edited by liampje at Feb 14, 2015,