#1
im pretty much a beginner but want to start building speed and coordination, (basically i have none right now) was reading another thread which mentioned John Petruccis rock disciplines, is this book right for what i need or is it too advanced for a beginner and if so is there anywhere else i can start, thanks for any advice.
#2
Speed Mechanics for Lead Guitar, by Troy Stetina, is a great book that will help you develop your technique.
The most important thing to remember (regardless of what resource you use), is that speed is a by-product of practicing slowly and accurately. You have to be patient and disciplined to do it right, otherwise, you're just going to be sloppy.
And if you don't already have one - get a metronome.
I'd like to help, but not as much as I'd like not to.


"To be successful, you need to be a good musician. To be popular, you just need to be fashionable" - Ritchie Blackmore
#3
I have heard the John Petruccis rock disciplines is good but I think as your a beginner there is lots of free lessons and information on the web that can get your started with this .
#4
Quote by crghannan
im pretty much a beginner but want to start building speed and coordination.



You're a beginner, but yet you want to start building your speed? In my honest opinion I think you need to stay away from technical exercises, and actually learn how to play the guitar. Start out with rhythm basically just strumming open chords. You know the basic stuff?

I just don't understand how someone can just want to get straight to technical exercises when just starting out. If you keep this mentality up you'll just be another one of the 1000's of guitarist that can play fast, but can't even strum a simple chord in time.. Without rhythm there is no music dude.
#5
What you practice is far less important than how you practice, there's no magic set of exercises that will suddenly make you better at certain things. What improves you is sticking to some basic rules and guidelines and being patient. So you need to make sure you're playing things accurately and in time before you worry about playing fast, likewise co-ordination is something that comes with time provided you're always working on it. You're the one moving your hand, if it's moving to far out all out of whack then you have to work on bringing it under better control. The one thing you do need is a metronome, you can't improve your timing and accuracy without something accurate to follow.

Also "beginner" covers a multitude of sins - if you're only in the first few weeks then this kind of stuff really isn't on your radar yet, certainly you don't want to be going anywhere near something like Speed Mechanics. Spend the first 6 months or so simply getting used to handling the guitar, it takes a while for it to stop feeling like a big stupid lump of wood and starts to feel like it's actually supposed to be there. Learn some chords, get a few simple songs under your belt and it'll start to feel a lot more natural, but until then there's not much point in worrying about too much else.
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#6
I hear what your saying about rythym, although i have no teacher i also thought this was really important , thats why i decided to learn some basic open chords first, A, D AND Emaj, A, D AND Emin, A,D AND E7, C and G, F (took me ages to get the F down) G7, C7, Fmaj7, B7,

I also pretty much have my power chords down aswell now after months of practice, currently practicing strumming at 190bpm on my metronome and just getting into octave chords which i am not finding too hard actually thanks to all the power chord practice i put in.

My timing and rythym have improved massively compared to when i ifirst started playing and still improving as i practice more but as all i can really do is strum chords i still class myself as a beginner and thats why i want to move on from just playing chords so maybe i wont be 1 of the 1000s of guitarists that can play fast, but can't even strum a simple chord in time.
#7
Quote by crghannan
I hear what your saying about rythym, although i have no teacher i also thought this was really important , thats why i decided to learn some basic open chords first, A, D AND Emaj, A, D AND Emin, A,D AND E7, C and G, F (took me ages to get the F down) G7, C7, Fmaj7, B7,

I also pretty much have my power chords down aswell now after months of practice, currently practicing strumming at 190bpm on my metronome and just getting into octave chords which i am not finding too hard actually thanks to all the power chord practice i put in.

My timing and rythym have improved massively compared to when i ifirst started playing and still improving as i practice more but as all i can really do is strum chords i still class myself as a beginner and thats why i want to move on from just playing chords so maybe i wont be 1 of the 1000s of guitarists that can play fast, but can't even strum a simple chord in time.

Sound like you need to slow down and start learning some basic songs that you like, I think for me timing and rhythm came naturally for me but a metronome will help you .
Try and work out your goals do you want to ever play solo or stick to rhythm guitar .
#8
i love playing rythym but would love to be able to play solo aswell, i have been learning rythym parts for some songs that i like, greenday, my chemical romance, foo fighters, smashing pumpkins, nirvana, soundgarden etc, love some of ray toros soloing and would like to get somewhere close to that one day.
#9
Quote by crghannan
i love playing rythym but would love to be able to play solo aswell, i have been learning rythym parts for some songs that i like, greenday, my chemical romance, foo fighters, smashing pumpkins, nirvana, soundgarden etc, love some of ray toros soloing and would like to get somewhere close to that one day.



This is a lot of mistakes beginners tend to make. They want to get straight, to soloing right away, but they don't tend to realize that. If you can't play rhythm then there's no way in hell you can solo. I can understand where you're coming from because I was once at that point where I was a beginner, and wanted to start soloing straight away. Think about it though how can you solo over something if you can't understand the rhythm part being played? Just stick to learning basic songs you're not yet ready to solo yet. Don't make the same mistake a lot of other people make, and go straight to soloing leaving rhythm completely behind. You need to have a strong foundation for the basics before you can even considering solo.


I would like to recommend this course for you because it's great, and has a solid foundation in it. Where you can really build up on the basics of playing


http://www.justinguitar.com/en/BC-000-BeginnersCourse.php

^ Course above


Go through this course trust me you won't regret it. Then after you're done with the beginners course you can then proceed to move on to the intermediate course. Which has Barre chords, and 16th note strumming. After you finish these courses then you'll have a strong enough foundation to be able to actually get into soloing.


Playing along to a record, and by yourself are two different things. You're just parroting when you play along to the record. Not really understanding the timing of how they're playing whatever they're playing. This course will do wonders for you..
Last edited by Black_devils at Jan 10, 2015,
#10
If you want to get shred check these out.

Paul Gilbert's "Intense Rock 1"

or

Michael Batio's "Speed Kills 1"

I'm not a fan of Petrucci's book. Too complicated.

Basically, get a metronome, take an short exercise, start very, very slowly, like half speed, play the exercise for 5 minutes. The next day bump the speed up one bpm and repeat. The next day bump speed up one bpm, etc. Play the exercise as best you can (perfectly). If you can't play it perfectly slow down.

Patience.

One thing to remember is that you get good at what you practice. If you want to get good at playing 1-2-3-4 then practice 1-2-3-4. Unfortunately it won't enable you to play anything else. So practice musically useful exercises like scale runs or how about licks in your favored style.
Last edited by Virgman at Jan 12, 2015,
#11
Quote by Virgman
If you want to get faster check these out.

Paul Gilbert's "Intense Rock 1"

or

Michael Batio's "Speed Kills 1"

I'm not a fan of Petrucci's book. Too complicated.

Basically, get a metronome, take an exercise, start very, very slowly, like half speed, play the exercise for 5 minutes. The next day bump the speed up one bpm and repeat. The next day bump speed up one bpm, etc. Play the exercise as best you can (perfectly). If you can't play it perfectly slow down.

Patience.


There is nothing wrong with beginning your guitar education with the ex in Speed Mechanics. It will develop your hands as it is designed to do period!

You need that early on!

As for intense rock etc. go through SM before as the teaching in those videos do not focus on the skills that makes you play those things. It is do this and that. That is slow now speed it up.

No get your hands in sync with SM as soon as you can.

It is so funny with Intense Rock and Paul Gilbert who is amazing. He has it down cold allready and legato + leading with an up stroke is developed long time ago so he can play and have fun as he does in does videos.

Now to novice or beginner if your hands are not up to the job you will never get there!

That is why SM is crusial to spend time with to cure the basic need and understanding for speed in general!

One warning though. It is exercises and not really music but essential to your skills to play music. So keep some music to learn with it so you do not burn out. This could be higher levels of playing like Yngwie or Satch etc.
Last edited by anders.jorgense at Jan 12, 2015,
#12
Speed Mechanics is fine. I just don't find the exercises in it as musically useful.

You can't get any simpler than these two beginning exercises which are musically useful...

Intense Rock 1 - Ex. 1:

G-Major Scale...

------------------12--------------------
--12--13--15--------15--13--12--etc.--
-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------
-------------------------------------

Speed Kills 1 - Ex. 1

D major scale...

-----------------------------------------
------------------------------------------
------------------11--12---------------------
--11--12--14--------------14--12--11--etc.--
-----------------------------------------
------------------------------------------
Last edited by Virgman at Jan 12, 2015,
#13
That is you do not understand the basics of the SM book!

Intense Rock Ex 1 is played with an up stroke!

You play 12- 13 -15 but 12 on the high e with an up stroke! That is the key and that is part of SM.

Now that is a skill that needs to be adressed and applied before watching Intense Rock I.

I know because I have personally gone through that skill in SM and it takes a while to get down! Now I can play that ex 1 from Intense Rock and speed it up.
#14
Quote by steven seagull
What you practice is far less important than how you practice, there's no magic set of exercises that will suddenly make you better at certain things. What improves you is sticking to some basic rules and guidelines and being patient.


That's very good advice.

To play more accurately you actually need to slow down and be very diligent about every note you hit. If it doesn't sound good slow, it will sound worse what played faster. Does every note sound correct and of high quality? Are you alternate picking? Use a metronome to keep track of your actual speed (speed can be measured and quantified).

Don't rush the fundamentals my friend,
#15
Don't rush the fundamentals my friend! + 1000000!

That is why vidoes are not the answer to the whole speed thing.

The title belongs still to SM by Troy Stetina. That contains the fundamentials 100%!

So partly learn or the whole spectrum ??