#2
Things to do:

Check so the bridge is setup properly.
Check intonation.
Check action.
Check how the strings are strung.
Check if you have anything that lubes the strings at the nut.
Check that you don't have too old strings.

Most cheap guitars are able to hold tuning well, if you set them up properly.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#3
I agree with above. I like to crush up graphite and put it in the nut. It acts as a dry lubricant, and it prevents strings getting caught on the neck and throwing it out of tune.
#5
How many rotations around the machine head are you making with your strings? The string should loop around the machine head at least three times as it will give a natural tension to keep it in tune.
#6
G string? Do you use a Les Paul? Those are notorious for the g string going out of tune, has to do with the angle of the headstock. Of course, a good setup might help but it's possibility that it's just the guitar shape.
My Gear:
Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plus Top
Schecter Damien Platinum FR
Yamaha FG700S (Acoustic)
Peavey Vypyr
Fender Mustang I
#7
Maybe your string is worn out?

How long have you've been playing (using it approx.) and how long ago did you last change the string?

I think if you've been continuously playing months/years on end, you probably need to change that string. It's either the string or you've probably got an issue with intonation.

Speaking of that, is your guitar an electric or acoustic and has the bridge got like screws on the back, opposite your playing hand?
I'm an interesting person... sometimes
#8
My G string seems to have gone out of tune more often than any other string, on all the 3 guitars I've ever owned. Weird.
Quote by Duv
The only good thing about my MG30 was I was able to have it in my room for 5 years solely as a place to hide cigarettes and condoms.
#9
Ive got a Taylor Big Baby acoustic, which is the worst offender for the G string going out of tune but also my electric Tanglewood which was cheaper stays in tune apart from the G string. The strings aren't amazingly old on either of them and always stretch them out before restringing. The strings are wrapped around the machine head about four times.
#10
Why does my G string always go out of tune?

- because it does

Everyones G string does this. I have a theory that it does that because it is the thickest of the plain strings. I have six guitars and the G string is the one that is most likely to be out of tune on all of them - so it's not just your guitar.
#11
Some more expensive guitars do it.I've have two Gibsons that had this problem.My Fenders don't.
Last edited by EyeballPaul at Jan 13, 2015,
#12
I used to hate everything about my G string, sound and tuning stability until I switched to a wound one a few years ago.
#14
Quote by Sickz
Things to do:

Check so the bridge is setup properly.
Check intonation.
Check action.
Check how the strings are strung.
Check if you have anything that lubes the strings at the nut.
Check that you don't have too old strings.

Most cheap guitars are able to hold tuning well, if you set them up properly.



This list is spot on. If you don't know how to check all of this, bring it to a tech for a setup and specifically mention the G string problem.
#16
Quote by PSimonR
Why does my G string always go out of tune?

- because it does

Everyones G string does this. I have a theory that it does that because it is the thickest of the plain strings. I have six guitars and the G string is the one that is most likely to be out of tune on all of them - so it's not just your guitar.



I have come to this conclusion also. 9 times out of 10 the G string will fall before the others will. Why? It just does every guitar I have and have ever owned does this. Its the first string I pluck when tuning.
Jackson Pro King V
Schecter LE Hellraiser C-1
Schecter Hellraiser V-1
Peavey 6505+
Marshall1960a
Line 6 Wireless G50> Boss TU-3> Dunlop Orignal Crybaby> Ibanez TS-9> MXR Smart Gate> Digitech Turbo Flange> MXR Black Label Chorus> MXR Carbon Copy
#17
The most common mistakes I see are...

Too many wraps on the tuning post

Tuning wrong.

I cut my strings about 1 1/2 inch past the tuner post, leave a 1/2 inch tag end sticking out, that makes 1 1/2 to 2 wraps usually.

Then I tune up to the note I want, never down and stay there. That eliminates the possibility you still have some stretch, a string in a bind in the nut, something loose somewhere...always go below the note you want and tune up to it. Never the opposite, that's probably mistake #1.

I played my Squier Strat 2 full sets last night without touching a tuner, before the B string finally dropped out of tune, and that was because I Had to use a capo and stretch a couple of strings to get it back into decent tuning with the capo on., Took it off and B string was off. Till then it was good. Same for the Cort CL1500, Gibson style setup. Tunes both before the gig, played the Cort 3 or 4 times during the night, never touched a tuner. Only time I had to redo the acoustic (Takamine) was when I tuned it to drop D for one song.

Some of the other comments are good too, I use a #2 pencil to put some graphite in the nut of any strat style guitar with floating tremolo.

Dead strings will almost always give you tuning problems. That's always the first thing to rule out by putting new strings on.

A good setup also makes a big difference.

Always stretch a new set of strings for a while before expecting them to stay in tune.

The first reply by Sickz is excellent. Check all of those.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
Last edited by Paleo Pete at Jan 17, 2015,
#18
For guitars with independent saddles, ie. Floyd Rose. Fender. E,A,and D are all large gauge wound strings plenty to grip to keep it in tune these saddles have a larger groove G, is quite a bit smaller. Wound but small. Usually manufactures use the same saddle for g as they do for d. Replace the saddle on the g string with a smaller one The b,and e strings use the smallest one this fixes the problem.
Last edited by Anima_Cantus at Jan 20, 2015,
#19
Anima Cantus recording on facebook. For discussion on all topics guitar related
Last edited by Anima_Cantus at Jan 20, 2015,
#20
Sometime you can tighten the screw that holds the machine head in place. Be careful because a little here goes a long way, very easy to strip
#21
If you have a fixed bridge, spin the saddle 180 degrees so you can move it back further. I find the G string can never be intonated properly from factory spec. If the intonation is off, every single note apart from the open string will make you believe its going out of tune, when infact it just means that the fret wires aren't corresponding to their note values correctly, simply because the string is slightly too short or long compared to the others.

Apart from that, when you string her up, do a good tight winding (I like about 10+ clean looking wraps around the peg for my G string, making sure every wind goes above the next.

If you nut isn't catching the string, its good practice to lube her up a bit with some lead pencil or there are special graphite pencils made for this purpose.

And finally, on a fresh restring, be sure to stretch them in good before the final tune up and play, whether its a fixed bridge or FR/Ibanez Edge type bridge. I didnt do this for years, but it really does make a difference. Tune to pitch, pull each string up with two fingers under it, tug a few times until you feel it wanting to snap back down, do the highest bend you can acheive a couple of times on each string on the 17th fret (really push that sucker up as far as your fingers will take it 3 whole steps if your hardcore), tune back to pitch, do that same process a further 2 times and tune up, you will be golden!
Gear:

- Amplitube 3, Guitar Rig 5 Pro, FL Studio 10
- Dean "Dimebag" Razorback DB
- Charvel DS2 ST
- Epiphone Explorer Korina 1958
- Jackson DK2 Hotrod Signature
- Dunlop Tortex .88mm Jazz Picks
- D'Addario XL 10-46