#1
I bought a Yamaha fg700s Guitar as my 1st one 3 years ago. As i was looking for a new upgrade last month i saw a Blueridge BR-60 in the shop that sounded great for about 450. Doubt i will ever afford a 1k+ guitar. Anyway when i bought my Yamaha i thought he said it was solid top, then when i was looking at the Blueridge he said it was solid top an Yamaha wasn't,he said it was solid top but lamented or something like that. My research says they are both Solid top. My question is what should i be looking for in specifications of a guitar to not waste $$ ? Solid top ? as far as body is that all i need to know? Tryin to use the forum an google to educate myself.Thanks for any an all help.
#3
Quote by Kapkrusdader
Maybe both are solid top an both laminated bodys ?



That's probably the case. Very common construction style for a better-than-entry-level-but-still-not-pro-status acoustic. Stay away from anything that's all laminate. They're dogshit, and aren't even worth the super cheap prices they sell for. Basically firewood. And crappy firewood, at that. Most brands start to offer a solid top once you hit the $200 price point. Almost everything between $200 and $1000 is gonna be solid top/laminate back and sides. You're typically looking at $1000+ to get all solid. It's expensive but it's so damn worth it. If saving up or making layaway payments or something like that is possible, I would absolutely recommend getting an all solid guitar.
#4
Quote by the_bi99man
That's probably the case. Very common construction style for a better-than-entry-level-but-still-not-pro-status acoustic. Stay away from anything that's all laminate. They're dogshit, and aren't even worth the super cheap prices they sell for. Basically firewood. And crappy firewood, at that. Most brands start to offer a solid top once you hit the $200 price point. Almost everything between $200 and $1000 is gonna be solid top/laminate back and sides. You're typically looking at $1000+ to get all solid. It's expensive but it's so damn worth it. If saving up or making layaway payments or something like that is possible, I would absolutely recommend getting an all solid guitar.


Hmmm, while that is sometimes true it is a piece of wikiwisdom that is best treated with caution.

The best fingerpicking guitar I have ever played is my Maton M300, which is all-laminate. I've played other similar Matons, though you wouldn't call them cheap.

Lam b&S has a very good pro niche, because they are tougher than all-solid, and when amplified though a piezo and preamp, the pickup system and construction is IMO a whole lot more important than the b&s materials. A pro guitar is one that works, nothing more. The last vid I saw of Kelly Joe Phelps, he was playing a Taylor 214, lam b&s, and I have consistently preferred these to the more expensive all-solid Taylor models.

I would absolutely not recommend getting an all-solid guitar without trusting your ears in unbiased comparisons. For example a lot of inexpensive solid rosewood guitars sound awful to me, dull clunkers, while this warm effect is often moderated in laminated versions of that timber.

Both the Yamaha and Blueridge are solid top, lam b&s.
#5
I am middle to late aged an have no desire to ever play in public or use an amp,dont need electric. But i want a good sound when i play. If i have a good sounding 200.00 Solid top yamaha i guess kinda wasting $$ to get a 500.00 solid top Blueridge ?? I should save for a all solid 1k+ guitar or or just keep the yamaha as its kinda the same as the BR?
#6
I have read reviews All solid vs Laminated and the solid body looked less durable and easily "damaged" in environments an a All laminated could sound good an was very durable.
#7
Quote by Kapkrusdader
I bought a Yamaha fg700s Guitar as my 1st one 3 years ago. As i was looking for a new upgrade last month i saw a Blueridge BR-60 in the shop that sounded great for about 450. Doubt i will ever afford a 1k+ guitar. Anyway when i bought my Yamaha i thought he said it was solid top, then when i was looking at the Blueridge he said it was solid top an Yamaha wasn't,he said it was solid top but lamented or something like that. My research says they are both Solid top. My question is what should i be looking for in specifications of a guitar to not waste $$ ? Solid top ? as far as body is that all i need to know? Tryin to use the forum an google to educate myself.Thanks for any an all help.
The Yamaha is solid top, and I don't know as if it's ever been offered in a laminated top model.

My suggestion to you is, don't buy another dreadnought. Body types have a certain generic base sound. Obviously some are much better, and some are poor at best, yet they share a family resemblance. I suggest you look at different shapes, such as jumbo, that which Taylor calls "Grand orchestra" & "Grand Symphony", and even "super jumbo", as offered by Epiphone in their, "EJ-200SCE, which is taken from a venerable Gibson design, The J-200.

The case of the Epi EJ-200 is interesting, since it wedges nicely into this discussion. The A/E version was, once upon a time, an all laminate guitar. After mid to late 2011 they were changed to solid tops, whereupon many more positive reviews, even raves about the guitar started appearing. AFAIK, the acoustic only version is still a laminated top, and it isn't as well received. So, the biggest stepup, (in the majority of cases), is the solid top. Solid back and sides, net less of an improvement proportionally, and are a lot more headaches.

Anyway, I have a bunch of acoustics laying around, (4 + a 12 string), and they're all different, (2 Ibanez AEL & EW, 1 Fender "Sonoran", an Epiphone EJ-200SCE, and finally a Crafter D8-12). They all fit different uses and different moods, and choice of strings is different for each one.

There are different schools of thought regarding whether or not you should "put all your eggs in one basket", and own one really good guitar, or have half a dozen decent instruments that do different things. Obviously, I'm in the latter camp.

All solid guitars are indeed, status symbols. But, the care and feeding of them is a PITA for sure.

What is truly important is strings. Resonance and sustain begin at the point where, "the rubber meets the road", so to speak, where the pick, (or fingers) hit the strings.

So, to sum this rant up, different body styles have different virtues, (and vices), and choice of strings, both in composition and gauge, have a great influence on your final results.

We get "I'd like to change my strings, they've been on the guitar for over a year", questions here quite often. My point being is, "are you tired of the guitar, or tired of the sound of those strings".

FWIW, a lot of the regulars here prefer the large body guitars in jumbo GS, GA, and even super jumbo sizes, in lieu of the more standard dreadnought. Somethings to think about in your travels.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 10, 2015,
#8
Quote by Kapkrusdader
I am middle to late aged an have no desire to ever play in public or use an amp,dont need electric. But i want a good sound when i play. If i have a good sounding 200.00 Solid top yamaha i guess kinda wasting $$ to get a 500.00 solid top Blueridge ?? I should save for a all solid 1k+ guitar or or just keep the yamaha as its kinda the same as the BR?


Trust your ears. I see absolutely nothing wrong with buying another more expensive guitar, but make up your mind based on side-by-side comparisons if you can. - I have been known to take my guitar down to the music store for comparison if I am thinking about buying a new one. And I would most definitely not confine my search to all-solid, or even let that influence my choices. In fact, if I had any bias at all, I would probably favour an inexpensive laminate to a solid at the same price. It is more likely to be stable and have less tonal eccentricities. Some of this interesting tonal stuff sounds good in the shop, but when you get it home it can start to bug you.

Some of what you pay for in the Blueridge is cosmetic, and the rosewood lam might turn out to be worse sounding than your Yamaha. As I said, trust your ears, not popular wisdom or the price tag.
#9
I love all the advice i have been given,I thank you all for taking the time to offer advice,opinions and suggestions.
I am basically a pure strummer,no finger picking etc at the moment. I use elixir thins an i change them regularly.Its the only string i have ever used,i think next time i may try a different brand an see what sound i get.Someone told me that blueridge may sound great in the store but if i put different strings on it i may get a sound i dont like. Think its time to try different strings before i buy a guitar,just so im more educated.
#10
I play "Still the same" Seger an "Take it easy" eagles an that kinda stuff..Still working on accuracy more than songs themselves.
#11
Another question,is the Yamaha fg700s a Folk Guitar or a dreadnought ?? Isnt their a difference in shape slightly ? I thought it was a Dread folk guitar but ive seen article on shapes an it showed pictures an differences in Dread,fol,jumbo etc
Last edited by Kapkrusdader at Jan 10, 2015,
#12
I would call it a dread. The name was first applied to 12 fret models made by Martin for Ditson, IIRC, but has since been applied a a variety of makes, shapes and sizes having a fairly thick waist. Maton did the same thing, calling their dreads "FG" for folk guitar. Even stranger, they called their 000 size "BG" for bluegrass, a genre which is associated just about exclusively with dreads.
#13
Quote by Kapkrusdader
Another question,is the Yamaha fg700s a Folk Guitar or a dreadnought ?? Isnt their a difference in shape slightly ? I thought it was a Dread folk guitar but ive seen article on shapes an it showed pictures an differences in Dread,fol,jumbo etc
"Folk" is indeed a size and shape descriptor for acoustic guitars. To me the 700 looks like it's half ass in between folk and dread. It lacks much af a waist, but it's also a wee bit shallower than a typical dreadnought. (4 5/8" as opposed to about 4 7/8").

You know, if you're past middle age and heading toward "old age", you don't really have to justify the purchase of another guitar to anyone, even yourself. I'm 66, and everything I want goes on the bucket list, under the heading of, "if not now, when"?

It truly doesn't matter if you just strum or whatever. Good rhythm guitar is an art unto itself.

A new guitar should invigorate your enthusiasm about playing, and that's a good thing. Just go for something decent that sounds and looks a bit different than what you have.

I'm a lefty, so the manufacturers sort of make up my mind for me as to what I'm allowed to have. You're free of that burden. (Or, is being left handed a blessing, I'm not certain. The answer probably lays somewhere in my credit card statements ).
#14
CC..Great post and your correct.. I have gotten a ton of great advice in this thread.
#15
There's several all solid guitars that go for less than $1000; Yamaha A3 series($8-900 and they have very good electronics), Seagull Maritime SWS - $700 without electronics and I think $100 or so more with electronics. Recording King and Epiphone also offer all solids well below $1000, I think the RK is around $500. Not sure what the model names/numbers are on those 2. The sound difference between a solid top/laminate S&B and an all solid is not going to be mind blowing.