#1
So a friend of mine who plays way more then i could ever dream of doing is going to sell one of his old acoustic guitars to me for beginner practice, which is what i need to be fair as i have no experience in acoustic and am really wanting to learn it.


The problem is, he cant remember the model number for the guitar, only that its made by Godman.


Can any identify this guitar for me and know if this is great for beginner steps?.


Also he said it is left handed, but i am right handed. Would this impact my learning at all?, i dont want to receive it and then not be able to use it . cheers all. IMAGE LINK DOWN BELOW

http://puu.sh/enGX9/9f1da4fdd2.jpg
#3
Rohash, what is the difference? im really new to it lol

He said he was going to restring it for me, but couldnt do it right handed i think.
#4
Well the obvious difference is that the cutout and the pickguard would be upside down. Also in order to re-string a lefty guitar upside down to make it playable right handed, you would also need to change the saddle and the nut. The saddle may not be a big deal to switch out, but changing the nut is a chore in which you would probably need to take it to a professional. IMO you're much better off just getting a right handed guitar instead of dealing with all that.
#6
The difference would be that the pick guard would be on the top of the sound hole. Other than that it can be restrung right handed so you can play it as long as it doesnt have a cut away body.
#8
Quote by strat-O-matic92
The difference would be that the pick guard would be on the top of the sound hole. Other than that it can be restrung right handed so you can play it as long as it doesnt have a cut away body.


How are you gonna re-string it to righty without changing the nut and saddle?
#9
Well judging by the model he is giving me, he said he is going to restring it to right handed. which obviously means you can with that model :P
#10
Quote by countercruel
Could you recommend a cheap beginners guitar then?


What's your budget?
#11
Quote by strat-O-matic92
The difference would be that the pick guard would be on the top of the sound hole. Other than that it can be restrung right handed so you can play it as long as it doesnt have a cut away body.
Why would a cutaway prevent you from playing it upside down? An upside down acoustic with a cutaway would present itself to the player as a standard full body acoustic. The only real problem would be the preamp controls, which would now be underneath, instead of on top.
#12
Well obviously i will ask for more then one opinion but.... since my mate is selling that guitar and restringing it to right handed for me for a total of 25 pounds, i would say i might just take that one to start learning, even if the nut and saddle may be in the wrong place.

Again i dont know yet about all these terms you use such as the nut or saddle. Look at the links i posted and tell me if its ok to play right handed :P, simple lol
Last edited by countercruel at Jan 11, 2015,
#13
Quote by countercruel
...[ ]...Also he said it is left handed, but i am right handed. Would this impact my learning at all?, i dont want to receive it and then not be able to use it . cheers all. IMAGE LINK DOWN BELOW...[ ]...
As a LEFT HANDED PLAYER MYSELF, please ignore any advice you've gotten so far, and go out and buy a right handed guitar. Yeah, I suppose the price is right here, but restrings upside down are Mickey Mouse at best.

Something on the order of 10% of the world's population is left handed. Less than 5% of guitars are manufactured left handed. So, if you're right handed, you have the guitar world by the tail, so to speak.

If money is an issue, you maybe able to find something on Ebay. With that said, many serviceable acoustics are available at the $100.00 USD price point.

As a rank beginner, you basically have no idea how to setup a guitar properly, let alone successfully do a left to right hand conversion. Believe me, poorly setup acoustics are the bane of noobs, and often discourage them from continuing with the instrument.

I tracked down, "Godman Guitars", (God-man, really (?) ), and it didn't appear they had an LH model in the line. That said, time and models change sometimes rather quickly, so they may have had one, (or more), sometime in the past.

If you have the means at your disposal, please link us to a picture of the guitar in question. That would be quite helpful.
#14
Quote by countercruel
Well obviously i will ask for more then one opinion but.... since my mate is selling that guitar and restringing it to right handed for me for a total of 25 pounds, i would say i might just take that one to start learning, even if the nut and saddle may be in the wrong place.

Again i dont know yet about all these terms you use such as the nut or saddle. Look at the links i posted and tell me if its ok to play right handed :P, simple lol
Do whatever you like. Is that simple enough?
#15
Well Captain, your first post was really informative and i agree on all the points you made, now im starting to doubt you as your second post was a tad rude :/

I was kind of expecting a "well it wouldnt fit a right handed style well but it will do".

Other then "your friend is screwing me without me knowing it" kind of talk
Last edited by countercruel at Jan 11, 2015,
#16
Quote by countercruel
Well Captain, your first post was really informative and i agree on all the points you made, now im starting to doubt you as your second post was a tad rude :/...[ ]....
Judging by the quote of yours I was responding to, I thought I was "fighting fire with fire", as it were. I did simplify the issue, (which you had asked to have happen), to the barest of bones essentials.

Myself, I don't have friends. I do have two cats. Accordingly, one has to ask, "does that make me objective, or simply bitter"?

In either case, I've had guitars over the years which I converted from right to left hand orientation. Neither of which was entirely satisfactory. So now, I place my guitar acquisitions in the hands of the manufacturers, who throw us lefties a bone from time to time.

IMHO, and without typing everything that need be different between a right and left handed guitar, I think a beginner's interests would be much better served, by starting out on a guitar that accommodates his manual orientation.

Now, I confess to not being able to read minds, so anything I say about your friend's motivations can be dismissed with prejudice. I don't think it's in your best interest to do this swap. OTOH, if it gets you involved to the point where you finally get disgusted enough, or tired of the bizarre aesthetics of a backwards strung guitar, to save up and grab a guitar more suitable to you, it could be a good thing.

Jimi Hendrix used to flip over his Stratocasters and play the crap out of them. History seems to bear out that anyone who advised him against it, was well, advising the unnecessary. But, there were less left handed guitars around back them. Not to mention he would often set them on fire after the concert. It would be just as stupid to get them custom made, only to destroy them after a couple hours of playing.

Much of the information and advice given by the posters thus far, (again IMHO), has been slightly inaccurate, if only the extent of being slightly incomplete.

Yes, you can flip a guitar over with a cutaway and play it. OTOH, you lose the benefit of the cutaway's intent and purpose, and the preamp controls are in your lap. As for "the saddle being an issue", that is true, but only in the case of a compensated saddle. A standard saddle will flip without any ill effects. However, the BRIDGE is a big deal, as it's compensation angle would be running opposite of what it should be, screwing up the guitar's intonation badly, as you try to play higher on the neck.

But here again, if you value the opinion of a mate over that of random strangers, it's only natural.

I think you'd be better of buying a right handed guitar, and starting there.

I'm always somewhat more subdued than many here, regarding how I suggest the spending of another's money, especially with respect to amount. At the end of the day, I still come back to the point where it's your decision, and I've typed as much on the topic as I plan to. I'm sorry if you interpret that as "rude".
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 11, 2015,
#17
Also the nut would be need to be changed, or else have the slots filled in and re-filed. I doubt that your friend is trying to screw you but I'm not sure if he realizes that there is more to this conversion than just re-stringing it upside down. I guess he'll find out when he tries to fit the 6 string in the 1 slot. Maybe he does realize this and has the skill, tools and parts to do it, IDK.

FYI when we talk about the nut and saddle, these are the pieces that the strings rest on. the nut is on the headstock end where the tuners are and the saddle is in the bridge which is attached to the body of the guitar below the soundhole. These parts are made of plastic on a cheaper guitar, and tusq or bone on a higher end model. Hope that helps.
#18
Cheers , helped a lot.

I in no way meant to be rude myself, its just a case of not having any spare cash around and or that i cannot save up very well with the wages i earn. So basically i have two choices at the moment, three if you count trying to save up. is.

1. get the cheapest but good starter guitar out there, right handed.

2. get one of those Martin Smith acoustics from Ebay

3. buy my friends converted one that he is going to restring.

you see my dilemma? haha!
#19
Yeah I understand where you're coming from. I don't know anything about the Martin Smith guitars or what's available in the UK. Some cheap acoustics that have a rep for being half-decent and good to learn on that I can think of are the Epiphone DR-100 and the Rogue RA-100D which both retail around $100 USD. Yamaha is always a good way to go, probably the best budget guitars around but I think their cheapest(FG335) runs a little more. The Yamaha FG700s is the most recommended guitar for beginners as it has a solid top and is good enough that you may not want to upgrade for a long time(if ever) but it runs around $200. You can always search the used market. I've saved some money there. No matter what you get, you want to makes sure that it's set up well with low action. Talk to the place you buy from and get them to set it up for you, or maybe your friend can help you. A guitar with high action is hard to play for anyone and nearly impossible to learn on. Good luck and let me know how you make out.
#20
I'll add one thing....

Get at least a few guitar lessons to start. There is SO MUCH information on line that you will be on your own soon enough, BUT the internet sucks at providing direct feedback on things like how you hold the guitar, press the strings, strum ect. A proper teacher will get you started right. Trust me when I tell you it's MUCH easier to learn good habits to begin with than trying to fix bad ones later.

Enjoy it man, I can't think of many other things you can do for your entire life and still be challenging. It truly never gets old
#21
Quote by countercruel
Could you recommend a cheap beginners guitar then?


Anything by Yamaha is perfectly useable at any price point - just make sure that the specific guitar you are buying has good intonation, stays in tune and has good action. If you don't know what those things mean, bring someone with you that does so that he or she can test it for you.
#23
The Rogue RD-100 previously mentioned is a nice guitar. For about $80 you can get an RD-80, I have one and it's really nice. Also, I like the Fender DG-60 selling for around $180 but I've bought 2 of them new for $80 on sale. I got the RD-80 for $40 new ... on a firesale.

Keep your eyes open for good used guitars here: http://www.guitarcenter.com/6-String-Acoustic-Acoustic-Guitar,Used-Gear.gc?extup=25-50,50-100&ipp=50&o=1

Always play the guitar before you buy it to make sure that quality, sound, condition and playability meet your criteria.
Last edited by billy_kidd at Jan 22, 2015,