#1
Hi! I hope this is in the right forum....

I recently joined a cover band where we play all around rock, from queen and oasis to gnr and metallica, and Im having a hard time when it comes to the heavier songs solos. Mostly because in lead work Im blues based, my lead view is to get some characteristic licks and incorporate them in the solo but improvise most of it really, I try to not loose escence and sense of speach in my leads, so usually they kinda go fine with the song, but I really would like to be able to solo in a more metal fashion, despite im not the fastest or most technical guy by any means, i can pretty much stand up and do the work, so im not talkin much about excersizes to develop techinque, is in the play thinkin where im stuck, mostly cause in metal the overall play feeling its so different from bluesy (obviously).

So what can i practice or play to get more into metal music? dont say sabbath or something "classic" cause they're more bluesy than metal, i want to be able to play free along the fretboard as i do when im in blues mode. should i shut and play the solos note by note?

I love heavy music but i've never been in the situation where i actually play it. I come from alternative and grunge and that stuff.

thank you all!!
#2
You should start with Maiden - Powerslave, Somewhere in Time and Seventh Son albums have great beginner metal solos that aren't too technical. Early Metallica has some very accessible solos as well. When you start getting into Megadeth and Testament the skill level skyrockets and much of that inaccessible at the start.

You really need to start by learning solos note for note - especially in metal. It's important to jam with the album tracks - this is how you get the feel under your fingers. Improvisation is rare in a typical metal tune - the solos are normally arranged and quite specific.

The solos in metal are a pretty central part of the tunes and people know them very well, so simply improvising around the backing track is probably going to annoy a metal audience. It's not like blues or jazz - people expect to hear the solo as recorded.
#3
Quote by reverb66
Improvisation is rare in a typical metal tune - the solos are normally arranged and quite specific.

The solos in metal are a pretty central part of the tunes and people know them very well, so simply improvising around the backing track is probably going to annoy a metal audience.


that was my biggest bummer, but you're so right.... thanks i'll check that maiden stuff.
#4
I say this a lot, but it's not really what you play, it's how.

Don't forget that rock pretty much evolved from the blues - Hendrix and early Clapton literally was blues, just cranked up a notch. Same goes for Jimmy Page, he made a whole career out of stealing blues licks whilst Tony Iommi and Ritchie Blackmore's material is only one evolutionary step further along.

So play your blues licks, but ramp up the attitude. Up the distortion a bit, play a little faster, attack the strings harder, vary your picking dynamics a bit, make your bends more deliberate and just generally add a little bit of agression in - you'll be well on the way even with the stuff you alreay know.
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#5
Quote by reverb66
You should start with Maiden - Powerslave, Somewhere in Time and Seventh Son albums have great beginner metal solos that aren't too technical. Early Metallica has some very accessible solos as well. When you start getting into Megadeth and Testament the skill level skyrockets and much of that inaccessible at the start.


I would also add the first few Black Sabbath albums to that list of easier metal solos. Some are easier than others of course, but most of them aren't too insane but still sound really cool. They are also mostly straight minor pentatonic, which anyone who plays blues should be very familiar with.