#1
Hello,

I have an Epiphone Annihilation Flying V.

Sometimes I use my pinky to hook around the bridge part closest to the pickup.

This bridge has adjustment screws that are quite tight.

I'm worried about a few things.

Is this a bad way to hold the guitar from time to time? I think it might have the capacity to mess up intonation. I don't mind having my guitar serviced yearly though.

My next question is this. My style is Annihilator, Megadeth, Iron Maiden, thrash in general.

What would be a good guitar for the above with a tougher bridge that can take a beating?

I love my Annihilation V but I think I'm going to break it to be honest. So I wouldn't mind having a tougher one for this stuff... but sounds just as good if not better.
#2
What you're describing is a habit called 'Anchoring'. In playing technique terms its generally considered a crutch that limits your right hand movement, and makes it more difficult for your right hand to relax and move fluidly, which is essential for techniques such as sweep picking.

Work on breaking the habit.
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#3
Okay basically I am trying not to anchor anymore since reading the reply. I also watched some videos of people playing and I am guessing there are great players who have all sorts of bad 'habits'.

So I find that the inside of my lower arm just under the elbow joint rests on the guitar quite a bit. Also there are times when it feels like I need to anchor my hand, such as when playing on the 17+ frets.

Is it possible to play without ever anchoring?

I tend to use my right upper leg to tilt the guitar at an angle sometimes so I can 'see frets and strings' from time to time.

I was told only my thumb, never my palm, should touch the back of the guitar neck. So I am doing that also.


As a note I will never play a Flying-v sitting down with the V between my right leg because it completely wrecks the input jack on my guitar.

I took my guitar into a shop for repair and got it back a week later. It seems that the strings are well raised above the fret board and this has solved some of the intonation problems I was having as well as needing to apply too much pressure to the strings. My fingers feel like they dance much easier now. Which leads to my next question...

How many out of the box and on display electric guitars actually need to be adjusted by a technition before they are good to play? I am talking the more top of the line makers such as Gibson, Epiphone, Fender, Ibanez etc. It seems to me that the guitar I bought and then one I just got back (which sounds a way better now) are almost two different guitars.
Last edited by Deermonic at Jan 28, 2015,
#4
For some techniques, anchoring is helpful as it is for some playing styles, as you've noticed by watching the pros. More valuable than forcing yourself to never anchor, I think is figuring out when it's useful to you and when it's a hindrance.

Is your guitar's jack on the lower wing? These days guitar manufacturers have moved jacks to upper wings so it doesn't get in the way of things. Not using your leg as a rest is going to make playing unnecessarily tough. Also trying out different cables might help, angled or straight ends.

You would think that guitars on display would have been setup at some point. When it comes to out of the box anything goes from what I understand. Some factories may do setups before boxing guitars of certain brands, others may not. Or perhaps it comes down to what each brand is willing to pay for. Regardless where you got your guitars from you should always check the setup.
#5
The guitar I have is a Epiphone Annihilation Flying-V. The actual outside of the lower wing has a rubber part not on the upper wing for resting on your leg. I have seen people use the inside of the V for their right leg and that is what I did. While the jack goes into the guitar some of the way I haven't found a connector short enough to have it like cable from the end of the input carving.There is always some chunk in the jack that sits out at a small angle, but its enough to wiggle the inside so much that basically it comes loose and the input connections shake around.

So I think Jeff Waters probably put this rubber part down there to have people play the V horizontally, rather than at steeper angle through using the inside of the V.
#6
When i solo my ring and pinky finger often touch the body/wood of the guitar just under the strings. This helps keep my picking hand stable. You shouldnt be wrapping your picking hand pinky around anything tho.

Concerning out of the box set ups, they blow. All they do is put on a new pair of strings. Schecter prides itself by saying all their guitars are set up before shipping out. Thats bullshit. Even Sweetwater lies about this. Never have I ever recieved/bought a guitar that didnt require me to set it up. Ive had 7 schecters, 1 esp, 1 ibanez, 1 fender, and plenty of cheap copies.
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#7
Quote by Deermonic
Okay basically I am trying not to anchor any more since reading the reply. I also watched some videos of people playing and I am guessing there are great players who have all sorts of bad 'habits'.

So I find that the inside of my lower arm just under the elbow joint rests on the guitar quite a bit. Also there are times when it feels like I need to anchor my hand, such as when playing on the 17+ frets.

Is it possible to play without ever anchoring?

You're actually basing this on incomplete information, sadly. Anchoring is not simply "touching the guitar". An anchor is having to have a fixed point on the guitar at all times such that it causes you extra tension and/or reduces the range of motion in your picking hand. Resting your picking hand on the guitar is fine, having to have (for example) your picking hand pinky on a pickup ring or else you can't play well at all is bad.

Resting your hand on the guitar is fine, and probably a good thing really because most people can't completely float their picking arms off the guitar without having to put a fair amount of effort in to it. Tonnes of people play without anchoring, in fact most really great pickers don't anchor, with some exceptions, and even a lot of those if you really watch them don't need their picking hand fixed to one point.

I would also say that what your picking hand is doing shouldn't really change based on what the fretting hand is doing; I don't know why you change when you're higher on the fretboard but I would work on changing that.

Finally... yes, tonnes of great guitarists have horrible playing habits, you can still be a good guitarist with horrible technique. That doesn't make their technique good though, it just means they've practised long and hard enough to overcome it. All the advice on this board from people who know what they're doing is aimed at you being the best guitarist you can be with the minimum amount of effort.

Quote by Deermonic
How many out of the box and on display electric guitars actually need to be adjusted by a technition before they are good to play? I am talking the more top of the line makers such as Gibson, Epiphone, Fender, Ibanez etc. It seems to me that the guitar I bought and then one I just got back (which sounds a way better now) are almost two different guitars.


Very few shop guitars are going to be perfect out of the box. I know some shops do set ups on floor models but even those won't necessarily be the way you want a guitar set up because there are a million different ways of doing it. Some shops also have a 'free set up with a new guitar' type service, so I'd take advantage of that when you can. You can also kind of mitigate this by making sure you get the exact guitar you played in the shop, so they don't go out and get one from the store room or whatever, but even then you might find that the set up will change when you get home due to climate and so on.

Brand doesn't often mean a huge amount when it comes to a guitar being properly set up right from the shop, because things can adjust and get knocked about in transit and, being that guitars are made of wood, changes in humidity can alter the set up that needs doing to a guitar if it travels from, for example, the Mississippi delta to Texas or whatever. Big brand guitars, or small high-end brands, are going to leave the place they're built better set up because they can afford to automate it or do it by hand... but that's no guarantee at all.
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#8
Thanks.

Just a quick correction.

I just watched Jeff Waters play with the inside of the V on his leg and the rubber bit resting against the inside of his other leg. Anyway, you can probably play it either way. I just wonder how playing a V that way can allow the jack input to survive. Seems even in a few sittings its going to get very loose. Maybe its just the quality of my jack input.

Alright, so anchoring is basically having to fix your wrist or part of the hand to be able to pick for a somewhat extended period of time, whereas it is okay to fix your wrist or part of the hand or fingers from time to time while dealing out some sounds, as long as its done flexibly and can be altered without loosing picking precision.

It seems to make sense that if you don't have to touch anything, then that's great, but I agree, the effort of suspending the arm in the air constantly is overwhelming and maybe on the Superman end of the guitar spectrum. So I guess I will try to not be overly cruel to myself about touching the guitar with my hand or wrist from time to time.

What about the fact I sometimes tilt the guitar so I can see strings and frets etc. Sometimes I hit without looking and sometimes I use my right thigh and knee to tilt the guitar so I can look down and see what's going on. Is this normal?
#9
Okay I think next time I get a guitar I will certainly look into getting it setup right. I actually didn't pay too much money to have it setup. About $15 and the guy at store brought my guitar alive. So I think I got a good deal.

Thanks
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