#1
I'm building a double humbucker telecaster and need some help regarding the electronics. I know how to wire it and everything but have no experience with picking capacitors and such. My question is, how would the wiring and capacitors look like and where do they go? What capacitors should I use on it, and what types should I purchase? (I'm using a 57 classic humbucker which has a single wire to it)
Last edited by nasserliverpool at Jan 13, 2015,
#2
Guitarelectronics.com has some info on tone capacitors that you might find useful:
http://www.guitarelectronics.com/category/wiring_resources_guitar_wiring_diagrams.wiring_faqs/#q5

When wiring them you usually wire one "leg" of the capacitor to one of the lugs on the tone pot. The other "leg" of the capactitor is wired to ground. The ground is often on the back of one of your pots - as long as there is a link between everything that should be ground you should be fine.
#3
Make sure to use .022 uf caps(orange drops are a good brand) and 500k volume and tone pots.
#4
I got the .022 caps. But theres another very small cap located on the selector. Anyone know if thats mandatory?
#5
firstly you want B500k volume potentiometers. A500k is ok but a little trickier to get the most out of the guitar.

why 500k for the volume= that is the industry standard in humbuckers
greater than 500k = brighter up to 2m exist
less than 500k = warmer - up to 25k are industry standard in guitars.

for tone knobs there is no darker or brighter. It's easier to explain
so 500k is a longer path 10 to 0 so you get less sensitivty 500 to 0 then 250 to 0. Regardless if the tone pot is at 10 it's still 10 and 0 is still 0.

types? this is sort of important
B500k = linear. A smoother 10-1 because as the name suggest if you were to roll down the volume knob to 0 it's in equal increments. Tone knobs use these predominantly for this very reason. They are predictable and I find they make guitars more versatile.

A500 = audio taper or logarithmic (depending on region its name changes like tube vs valve) - 10 - 1 creates this swell if you go to 0 fast. This makes the guitar unpredictable when rolling down the volume knob for more "warmth". So if you did go with audio taper pots do vintage style wiring or a Kinman treble bleed (google it, it's super easy). The kinman way is the best way to do this.

so as we know when we roll the volume down the guitar can go warmer so no sense in re-wiring the guitar from say 500k to 250k as you can get that 250k tone easily with a linear pot. Makes sense right?

The larger the capacitor the bigger the difference in tone. Personally I'd go 0.047 as 0.022 is too subtle. In the 60s Fender used 0.1uf capacitors and the difference is gigantic but this is personal taste like material you go with. 0.033 Godin uses for example as an in between to satisfy everyone.

don't forget to shield the guitar with some copper or whatever. As for electronics ebay, guitarelectronics.com, Stewmac, guitarheads.net , lots of great sites. I'd highly recommend at least one push pull pot to get 2x the tones.

for the ultimate in versatility without spending all day wiring I suggest the Fender TBX kit. Keep the tone knob at 5 by the way using it. 0 = a fully rolled back tone knob. 10= a fully rolled back fender greasebucket (clears up pickups if muddy). I really like this innovation by fender. It's a passive mod that requires little soldering skills.

here's the final result with the kinman treble bleed does in the end. They use a slightly different version of this mod so use whatever you think is best.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e0SLdOWvz3c&spfreload=10
#6
Quote by Tallwood13
firstly you want B500k volume potentiometers. A500k is ok but a little trickier to get the most out of the guitar.

why 500k for the volume= that is the industry standard in humbuckers
greater than 500k = brighter up to 2m exist
less than 500k = warmer - up to 25k are industry standard in guitars.

for tone knobs there is no darker or brighter. It's easier to explain
so 500k is a longer path 10 to 0 so you get less sensitivty 500 to 0 then 250 to 0. Regardless if the tone pot is at 10 it's still 10 and 0 is still 0.

types? this is sort of important
B500k = linear. A smoother 10-1 because as the name suggest if you were to roll down the volume knob to 0 it's in equal increments. Tone knobs use these predominantly for this very reason. They are predictable and I find they make guitars more versatile.

A500 = audio taper or logarithmic (depending on region its name changes like tube vs valve) - 10 - 1 creates this swell if you go to 0 fast. This makes the guitar unpredictable when rolling down the volume knob for more "warmth". So if you did go with audio taper pots do vintage style wiring or a Kinman treble bleed (google it, it's super easy). The kinman way is the best way to do this.

so as we know when we roll the volume down the guitar can go warmer so no sense in re-wiring the guitar from say 500k to 250k as you can get that 250k tone easily with a linear pot. Makes sense right?

The larger the capacitor the bigger the difference in tone. Personally I'd go 0.047 as 0.022 is too subtle. In the 60s Fender used 0.1uf capacitors and the difference is gigantic but this is personal taste like material you go with. 0.033 Godin uses for example as an in between to satisfy everyone.

don't forget to shield the guitar with some copper or whatever. As for electronics ebay, guitarelectronics.com, Stewmac, guitarheads.net , lots of great sites. I'd highly recommend at least one push pull pot to get 2x the tones.

for the ultimate in versatility without spending all day wiring I suggest the Fender TBX kit. Keep the tone knob at 5 by the way using it. 0 = a fully rolled back tone knob. 10= a fully rolled back fender greasebucket (clears up pickups if muddy). I really like this innovation by fender. It's a passive mod that requires little soldering skills.

here's the final result with the kinman treble bleed does in the end. They use a slightly different version of this mod so use whatever you think is best.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e0SLdOWvz3c&spfreload=10


Thanks for spending some of your time explaining what I should consider. Thanks man.
#7
Glad I could help. I mod guitars for people as a side business and when they sit and watch it happen I try to explain what is going on so they can do it themselves the next time.