#1
I recently picked up a Harmony Discovery Igniter II. (Cherry red, two single one humbucker pickup; labeled "Igniter II", three two way pickup switches.) I was wondering if someone could estimate how much this guitar is worth. It plays well, straight neck, original pickups from what I could find. I paid 150 for it if anyone is interested.

Thanks.

Last edited by Pentium44 at Jan 14, 2015,
#4
Why would it be "worth more than an eBay auction"? It's probably the most accurate way to determine what a fair price is. It's an open auction on a large market. Granted, it's only one data point, but your $150 price and the complete lack of information online makes me think that there's not a lot of demand for these, and the prices reflect that.

If we want to break it down further, shipping on that eBay auction was $55. If these guitars were worth any significant amount of money, you'd think someone would have bid more than $32. Harmony is known mostly as a very low end, department-store guitar company. Harmony has gained some "shabby chic" popularity in recent years thanks to Jack White, but this guitar doesn't fall into the correct styling or vintage categories that lifted Harmony instruments out of the $100 bargain bin range. I think $50-100 is a fair guess based on the information we have.

I found your guitar in the 1989 JC Penney catalog for $169.99. Cheap guitars sold in department store catalogs tend to depreciate severely in value, so I think your evaluation is rather optimistic. I'll stick with $80 as a fair market price.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/wishbook/9116110135/in/set-72157632513516316/
#5
The best thing to do is research prior to making a purchase Like ROC said it's only the vintage dept. store guitars that are fetching high prices these days.

I have this mid-1960s Silvetone more than likely made by Teisco in Japan and sold in the Sears and Roebuck catalog. I got this one on eBay for $150 plus $20 to ship it is in near mint condition the guy had a ton of pics and even then I messaged back and forth with him with questions and it has enough features for the time period that you can find similar ones on eBay for $300 or more depending on condition and rarity (I found an identical one to mine for $250 plus shipping and it was no where near a clean as mine)



Buyer beware, do your homework first!

"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

#6
generally speaking, the used guitar market is absolutely flooded with entry level low end stuff so the demand never generates value. The only time these go up in value is if a famous musician is seen playing one, then for some reason a dime store piece of crap is worth its weight in gold. BUT, for the most part entry level guitars tend to be really cheap guitars that don't sell for anything on the used market.
Quote by BlackVoid
Every guitar and bass forum I've visited has some people chasing some magical tone that will shoot jizzing unicorns riding on a rainbow out of their amp.
#7
Quote by Roc8995
Why would it be "worth more than an eBay auction"? It's probably the most accurate way to determine what a fair price is. It's an open auction on a large market. Granted, it's only one data point, but your $150 price and the complete lack of information online makes me think that there's not a lot of demand for these, and the prices reflect that.

If we want to break it down further, shipping on that eBay auction was $55. If these guitars were worth any significant amount of money, you'd think someone would have bid more than $32. Harmony is known mostly as a very low end, department-store guitar company. Harmony has gained some "shabby chic" popularity in recent years thanks to Jack White, but this guitar doesn't fall into the correct styling or vintage categories that lifted Harmony instruments out of the $100 bargain bin range. I think $50-100 is a fair guess based on the information we have.

I found your guitar in the 1989 JC Penney catalog for $169.99. Cheap guitars sold in department store catalogs tend to depreciate severely in value, so I think your evaluation is rather optimistic. I'll stick with $80 as a fair market price.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/wishbook/9116110135/in/set-72157632513516316/


Thanks for the reply and all, and I am greatful for that catalog. I couldn't find one, but I guess the guitar was just worth more to me considering its in good playing condition and sounds excellent. Thanks for your time everyone!
#8
I've got one like your red one, except minus its original color and many of its parts. I think a previous owner might have tried modding it. It was given to one of my stepsons some years ago, and now it's sitting around as a "future project" for me. At least anything I do to it won't really devalue it any.

We could form a cult around them. I nominate Pentium44 for club president.
#9
That's also not a true Harmony. Harmony never used that headstock, it was used by a Japanese company that used the Harmony name to make money after the original Made in USA Harmony closed in the early 70's. Harmony guitars were made in the US. Some were beginner level cheap guitars, like my 1966 Bobkat, some were better quality and used by a lot of people. Some are collectors items today. The Rocket and Stratotone models were pretty well liked. And pretty good guitars too. I'd love to find a Rocket in good shape...


http://harmony.demont.net/catalogs.php


Here is a page showing a bunch of their older catalogs. That guitar won't be in it.

Here's the history of the company http://www.harmonyguitarsusa.com/

My opinion, you paid too much. I've passed up dozens of these Japanese Harmonies, some may be decent but if I want a Harmony, I want the real thing not a Japanese knock off. The original Harmony never made any copies, they made their own body styles. They started making copies of Les Pauls and Strats, mostly strats, in the Japanese era. And started using the headstock you have, the earlier ones also had "Est 1892" on the decal, which was never on the harmony headstock.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#10
Quote by 12string_doug
I've got one like your red one, except minus its original color and many of its parts. I think a previous owner might have tried modding it. It was given to one of my stepsons some years ago, and now it's sitting around as a "future project" for me. At least anything I do to it won't really devalue it any.

We could form a cult around them. I nominate Pentium44 for club president.


Thanks for the vote! And I believe that it's kind of sad that these guitars are frowned upon. Japanese manufacturers for guitars tend to do good work on building these guitars. It's been sitting here and I play it from time to time, but it's gonna hang on my wall honestly.
#11
Quote by Pentium44
I recently picked up a Harmony Discovery Igniter II. (Cherry red, two single one humbucker pickup; labeled "Igniter II", three two way pickup switches.) I was wondering if someone could estimate how much this guitar is worth. It plays well, straight neck, original pickups from what I could find. I paid 150 for it if anyone is interested.

I have owned two of those Harmony Discovery guitars. Both were red, too.

They both played better than expected, and their construction was also decent. The bad reputation of the old Harmony guitars affects their value. I assume that you liked how it felt or played, so $150 isn't a that bad of a deal.

I parted one guitar out. All three Igniter II pickups were hot. I don't remember precisely how hot they were, but I think that the single-coils were both over 10K and the humbucker was almost 20K. If you are looking for that type of output, then part out a Discovery.