#1
Since Mr. Amp Tech suggested that I just get a power conditioner instead of working with the guts on my VK, I've been looking around for such a thing. My budget is extendable to $100 USD, but the cheaper the better ofc.

I don't need anything fancy, just something to power my pedals and amp, my pedals are pretty quiet though. I think I'll make a rack to carry the amp and the power conditioner, so a rack-sized PC would be nice.

Here's what I'm looking at: http://www.musiciansfriend.com/accessories/furman-m-8x2-power-conditioner#productDetail

Furman seems to be a standard name for power conditioners. I checked one of the higher-end models for ~$100, and there was only a +3db boost to the noise attenuation, which is the main thing I'm looking for. So nah.

Any other suggestions?
Last edited by Will Lane at Jan 15, 2015,
#2
Quote by Will Lane
Furman seems to be a standard name for power conditioners. I checked one of the higher-end models for ~$100, and there was only a +3db boost to the noise attenuation, which is the main thing I'm looking for. So nah.

Any other suggestions?
If that doesn't look good to you then you don't need/want a power conditioner.

3dB less noise isn't that little less noise considering it's only coming from a power conditioner.
Also that noise in your VK will not go away if you get a power conditioner, and if you still use wall warts to power up pedals there'll still be a bit of noise coming from the power.

So, I wouldn't get a power conditioner in your situation.

If you do absolutely want one then be advised that the cheap ones don't filter out THAT MUCH and one may well fail on you if there's a big ripple in voltage, so either get two cheap ones, a main unit and a backup, or spend some serious money on an zero-surge or a surge-x and be sure to be safe for the rest of your days.
Name's Luca.

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Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
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#3
Of course, I'd rather have the filter caps replaced/upgraded as well, but I might as well get a power conditioner to move into professionalism. Wouldn't a PC just do essentially the same thing by "cleaning" the AC noise before it gets to the amp? Not only that, but surge protection is nice too.
Last edited by Will Lane at Jan 15, 2015,
#4
Quote by Will Lane
Well, the only way to make the amp quiet by itself is to work on the filter caps according to the tech.
Fancy some soldering?
Quote by Will Lane
If I use a power conditioner in between the amp and the wall, wouldn't that essentially do the same thing?
Not really.
Quote by Will Lane
It would attenuate the AC noise by 23 db.
Quoting what you likely have read,
Quote by product page
Noise attenuation: Transverse mode: Greater than 23dB, 200Khz to 10 MHz
See, that 23dB of noise attenuation would be between 200kHz and 10MHz, which means it's something that would very mildly affect the noise reduction in your hearing spectrum.

Not only you should stop quoting things you don't know the meaning of - you should also benefit a lot from understanding at least a bit these kinda specs.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
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#5
You're right, that's why I posted here because really I don't know what I'm doing.

200kHz to 10MHz, those are ultra-high frequencies right? You're right, that wouldn't do much. So what's the point of a power conditioner for AC noise removal? Even an $800 model only attenuates 10db at 10khz.

Sorry, I blindly saw the db attenuation and didn't look at the frequencies. I don't get it.
Last edited by Will Lane at Jan 15, 2015,
#6
Quote by Will Lane
You're right, that's why I posted here because really I don't know what I'm doing.

200kHz to 10MHz, those are ultra-high frequencies right? You're right, that wouldn't do much. So what's the point of a power conditioner for AC noise removal?


A power conditioner will not improve your AC hum. I'm not sure changing the filter caps will help either.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#8
Quote by Will Lane
200kHz to 10MHz, those are ultra-high frequencies right?
Yes, the human hearing goes from around 20Hz to around 20kHz.
Quote by Will Lane
You're right, that wouldn't do much. So what's the point of a power conditioner for AC noise removal?
That wouldn't be its only effect, though they write high numbers like that so that people think it's a meaningful data and buy it just 'cause there are high numbers.
Quote by Will Lane
Even an $800 model only attenuates 10db at 10khz.
10dB @ 10kHz is a hell of a noise reduction y' know.

10kHz is something you can clearly hear, and a reduction there is something you can definitely benefit from.
Not like the thing will reduce the noise floor that much in any scenario, but even half of that is gonna be a big improvement considering what the thing's doing.
Quote by Will Lane
I was told that most of the noise comes from interference and AC noise.
That solely depends on the setup.
In my setup, most of the noise comes from interference 'cause my guitar picks up a hell of a lot of noise, and the same goes for the only long cable I'm using.

In your case, the most noise likely comes from a filter cap gone bad.
No way you can be sure about that unless you substitute them though.
Quote by Will Lane
So what do I do?
You have three options here as I see it:
1. you do nothing and you keep your negligible but still annoying noise
2. you substitute the filter caps and hopes for the best
3. you have the filter caps substituted and hope for the best
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#9
Neat. The tech quoted $150 to replace the filter caps/work on ground.

So either I pay him that, or learn to do it myself and potentially break my amp/my heart.

Does it help at all that it sounds like 60hz hum/buzzing? Would a Hum-X do anything?
Last edited by Will Lane at Jan 15, 2015,
#10
Quote by Will Lane
So either I pay him that, or learn to do it myself and potentially break my amp/my heart.
If you learn to do that you don't break anything.
Just, you gotta learn to do it.

That applies to more or less everything.
Quote by Will Lane
Does it help at all that it sounds like 60hz hum/buzzing?
Not any more than how it has helped us already - we think it might be a filter caps problem.
Now we presented you with the solutions we feel would work, up to you to decide what to do at this point.
Quote by Will Lane
Would a Hum-X do anything?
Not if you can't manage to put it after the filter caps.

Read, no it won't work.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#11
Quote by Will Lane
Neat. The tech quoted $150 to replace the filter caps/work on ground.

So either I pay him that, or learn to do it myself and potentially break my amp/my heart.

Does it help at all that it sounds like 60hz hum/buzzing? Would a Hum-X do anything?

Well there is a chance of your heart stopping & you dying rather than the amp breaking if you dont know to drain those first.

It helps a bit to know the frequency of the hum you are experiencing. 50/60Hz hum can come from bad/dirty ground connection, either from mains wiring or loose connection from within the rig. Now if your filter caps had failed then you'd normally be getting 100/120Hz hum. Search online for audio samples of hum at those frequencies then listen to what's coming through the amp speaker without the guitar or pedals plugged in & gain all the way down while volume all the way up.
#12
It's 60hz. Which is why I'm fairly frantic on understanding it. If it was grounding issues, wouldn't the buzz/hum volume increase when turning the volume knob up?

I did notice that utilizing the effects loop (something I have to do with my setup) decreases the hum a significant amount. So I got that going for me. Which is nice.