#1
Recently, I picked up and Oasis OH-1 humidifier, and it's been in my guitar case with my Takemine EG523SC for about a little over 2 weeks now. However, every time I check the hydrometer in the case it's reading is around 35% humidity. The relative humidity of the room the case is kept in is about 20% due to the heat in these winter months in New York. Do I need a stronger humidifier, or does the case simply take more time to adjust?
Guitars
Gibson Explorer
Takemine EG523SC
Epiphone Slash Signature Les Paul
BC Rich Mockingbird ST

Amp
Vox Valvetronix 100watt

Pedals
TC Electronics Ditto Looper
Dunlop Original Cry Baby
Electro-Harmonix Freeze Sound Retainer
Last edited by guitarguyz61 at Jan 15, 2015,
#2
I have the same humidifier and in the winter months, my hygrometer reads about 35% as well...

I cannot tell if the humidifier sucks or if the hygrometer is getting a bad reading cause it is not in the body of my guitar. I have simply started using a wet sponge in a plastic bag and throw that in the sound hole with a few holes in the bag in addition to my oasis for added moisture.
#3
Well it's still 15% higher than the room so I'd say it's helping. You might want to get a room humidifier to get it higher than 20%. 35 is a tad below the desired 40 but I don't think it's danger zone low. I have a $25 sunbeam room humidifier that works pretty good.
#4
did you test the hygrometer before you started using it?
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#5
Just checked the readings tonight, and the humidity in the case is reading 36%. I checked the hydrometer against the original one I had bought from a radioshack a while back, and they both read about the same for the room humidity and the case. I believe they make a stronger version of the humidifier, but not sure I want to give that a try just yet. Would it probably just be better to get a cheap room humidifier at this point?

EDIT: Would there be a possibility that the humidifier is having a harder time reaching 40-50% due to the fact that the guitar is a jumbo sized body? Is that something worth taking into consideration?
Guitars
Gibson Explorer
Takemine EG523SC
Epiphone Slash Signature Les Paul
BC Rich Mockingbird ST

Amp
Vox Valvetronix 100watt

Pedals
TC Electronics Ditto Looper
Dunlop Original Cry Baby
Electro-Harmonix Freeze Sound Retainer
Last edited by guitarguyz61 at Jan 16, 2015,
#6
Quote by guitarguyz61
...[ ]....EDIT: Would there be a possibility that the humidifier is having a harder time reaching 40-50% due to the fact that the guitar is a jumbo sized body? Is that something worth taking into consideration?
Well, "the inverse square law", definitely attaches to the interior area of just about anything, guitars included. (You can Google that).

Then too, I expect where you started, with respect to RH and water content in the wood is also a big part.

OK, you can check a hygrometer's accuracy with a "salt test", and I credit Patti for usually bringing this to everyone's attention. So, more googling, "hygrometer salt test".

In has been my experience, (although very limited), that hygrometers are slower to respond than other measuring devices.

You need to tell us if your profile has changed. I would say if you're still in NYS, and using central heating, without a built in humidifier, you would benefit from a room humidifier. READ, "USED JUDICIOUSLY". Small humidifiers have a nasty habit of going moldy rapidly. So, check your meters, and don't try to adjust everything all at once. As long as the humidity in the case isn't dropping, you should be good to humidify toward standard, at your relative leisure, Slow and steady wins the race.

As t whether or not you need to humidify your room, if you're getting hit with static shocks, the answer is most likely yes.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 17, 2015,
#7
We live in CT and the heat is on, so the two humidifiers run 24-7. The guitar (stored in the case when not being played) is benefited by an extra humidification I built. I took a small plastic container (like a soap dish) and put a damp sponge inside. Leave the dish open. The damp sponge is exposed. The hygrometer read 46 when I had it in the case.
Ann

_______________
Handmade classical guitar
Luthier Richard Young
Still Rivers Guitar, Eastford CT
#8
Yes, I still live in NYS. So, I looked into the inverse square law with a bit of googling. Had no idea that applied to the interior of a guitar body. I thought it only pertained mostly to sound waves, but it makes sense when applied to humidification as well now that I think about it. Anyways, I haven't gotten around to performing the salt test on my hydrometer yet, but I definitely will within the next few days.

As far as the room humidifiers go, I am a college student and dorm in Upstate New York. So, humidifying a room isn't really an option for me here. If I were to get another Oasis humidifier and mount it in the headstock area of the case, in combination with the one I already have in the sound hole, would that do the trick? I just want the levels to read at least 40% and i'd be happy with that.
Guitars
Gibson Explorer
Takemine EG523SC
Epiphone Slash Signature Les Paul
BC Rich Mockingbird ST

Amp
Vox Valvetronix 100watt

Pedals
TC Electronics Ditto Looper
Dunlop Original Cry Baby
Electro-Harmonix Freeze Sound Retainer
Last edited by guitarguyz61 at Jan 19, 2015,
#9
Quote by guitarguyz61
Yes, I still live in NYS. So, I looked into the inverse square law with a bit of googling. Had no idea that applied to the interior of a guitar body. I thought it only pertained mostly to sound waves, but it makes sense when applied to humidification as well now that I think about it. Anyways, I haven't gotten around to performing the salt test on my hydrometer yet, but I definitely will within the next few days.

As far as the room humidifiers go, I am a college student and dorm in Upstate New York. So, humidifying a room isn't really an option for me here. If I were to get another Oasis humidifier and mount it in the headstock area of the case, in combination with the one I already have in the sound hole, would that do the trick? I just want the levels to read at least 40% and i'd be happy with that.


The recommended humidity level is 40%-55%. That's why it's recommended to use a humidifier year round if you have dry winters and /or keep the guitar in an airconditioned space. So it can get expensive and tedious. I try and keep my guitars around 38-40% and haven't had any problems.

See my signature for humidifier ideas.

http://www.acousticguitarforum.com/forums/showpost.php?p=4306948&postcount=5