#1
My guitar teacher has an Indian brand Strat copy guitar with an alder body, maple neck, rosewood fretboard and three single coil pickups that sound like crap (maybe his amp sounded like shit, but most probably both) and strings on the verge of decadence.

It costs around 115$ new so that should give you an idea. Is it a good idea to get it second hand, buy a Marshall MG15CF (solid state) amp and 130$ Duncans and get it serviced with brand new strings and set up properly? Will it sound decent?

Have a look at it: http://www.furtadosonline.com/product/Java-electric-guitar-eg-11-black-128667.html
#2
Why polish a turd?

Plus, those Marshall solid state amps are crap. The only thing "Marshall" about them is the name.
#3
Quote by kentuckyklira
Why polish a turd?

Plus, those Marshall solid state amps are crap. The only thing "Marshall" about them is the name.


OK forget the MG, basically an amp that's around 160$. And I'm doing this because I can get the guitar really cheap and it could be a good foundation to build on. My question is, will it still sound like shit afterwards?
#5
Quote by dazza027
Most likely.

Please clarify which question you are answering to. If it's the second question, please also tell me if it would be better to go for a Schecter Omen 6 with a 135$ amp.
#6
Quote by josonmj
My guitar teacher has an Indian brand Strat copy guitar with an alder body, maple neck, rosewood fretboard and three single coil pickups that sound like crap (maybe his amp sounded like shit, but most probably both) and strings on the verge of decadence.

It costs around 115$ new so that should give you an idea. Is it a good idea to get it second hand, buy a Marshall MG15CF (solid state) amp and 130$ Duncans and get it serviced with brand new strings and set up properly? Will it sound decent?

Have a look at it: http://www.furtadosonline.com/product/Java-electric-guitar-eg-11-black-128667.html


Sounds like you need a better guitar teacher bro, pretty amateur if he doesnt even know how to change strings.
Last edited by zach9600 at Jan 17, 2015,
#7
Quote by josonmj
Please clarify which question you are answering to. If it's the second question, please also tell me if it would be better to go for a Schecter Omen 6 with a 135$ amp.


You only asked one question, will it still sound like shit?... So, yes it most likely will. You haven't mentioned what genre of guitar you want to play, and as far as gear goes, a $20 Strat knock off and probably one of the worst solid state amplifiers ever made... It is most definitely going to sound like shit. Dont waste the money on the pick ups, don't even buy that guitar, for next to nothing you can find something, anything better than a plywood fake guitar and for not much more you can get a reasonable amp. My first proper guitar was my Jackson PS1 and a Fender Princeton Chorus amplifier which I payed $150 for the pair. Don't grab the first thing you see because usually you will regret it. As for the Schecter, I've never owned one, I've heard good and bad... The best thing to do is methodically test it out, it don't matter what it looks like as long as it plays well and suits your hands. And an amp? I hear Peavey Vypers are popular, not that I would ever buy one myself but its a start.
#8
Well, I'd suggest getting the Fender Mustang 1 and a used MIM Strat if he likes strats. The fender mustang actually sounds good, but an Orange CR20LDX or Vox Valvetronix VT20+ will do too. "Fixing" that rig will be a waste of money.

To be honest, if your teacher has a lousy rig, he probably doesn't know what he's doing. Sure, gear is just a tool, but if you want to teach, you should at least have something much more better than that, the students deserve better. If he wants to teach, then he has probably outgrown his noob rig. Or he just wants money, that's all...actually most likely.
#9
Giant misconception here... My teacher doesn't even use this guitar (which is why the strings are rusted), he uses a Dean MLX (which is pretty good IMO) and owns a large variety of rich-sounding acoustics. He saw I was interested in electrics and offered to lend me one so that I could get a feel of how it works. It's been lying here for over two months along with an amp which he doesn't use either.

But my question is, aren't the main sound factors pickups and the amp. Forget the Marshall MG15CF, if I get something good for my price range along with good pickups, shouldn't it sound good? I think the body is alder, not plywood. They couldn't advertise it as alder if it wasn't right? Idk... The fretboard is decent and I like the feel of the neck too...

Edit: the guitar is for me, not for him lol.
Last edited by josonmj at Jan 17, 2015,
#10
Well play the guitar if it plays well and that is all you can afford then maybe. I don't know what options are available where you live I would probably get a Squier they make them at the same price point. (although I would get a higher end one those are quite nice) If that guitar plays well then open up the back cavity and look to see if it is made of solid wood. If it is then it might take some mods well.
#11
Quote by josonmj
But my question is, aren't the main sound factors pickups and the amp. Forget the Marshall MG15CF, if I get something good for my price range along with good pickups, shouldn't it sound good?

Correct...

But there is no reason to do so. First of all, getting a good/decent low-end guitar will still be cheaper than buying this and upgrading. Secondly, you can swap out pick-ups and re-wire guitars but you can't change (for the most part) its playability. Personally, the first thing to look out for in a guitar is to feel it and play it. Is it comfortable, do you like how it plays, is the neck profile to your liking, is your right hand position on the guitar comfortable for you and blah blah blah. Then you look into sound.

It's much easier to make a good playing guitar sound better than to make a good sounding guitar play better. It's still your choice in the end but this is my personal opinion.
#12
I've put expensive pickups in a few cheap guitars, so I see nothing wrong with the principle, provided to guitar in question is OK overall, including playability. The pickups in my junker rescue Peavey Raptor cost about twice as much as the rest of the guitar. Being honest, I like the anti-snob appeal - think Seasick Steve. But you do need to think about a decent amp as well, as you recognise.
#13
Yeah... Cheap guitars don't usually feel that great. It's not all about the tone.

When it comes to tone, your amp is the most important factor.

In the beginning tone is not the most important thing. So I would get the best feeling guitar you can find in your budget. Maybe buy it used. Then get a versatile amp. Again, the tone doesn't need to be that great. But today modeling technology is pretty good so even cheap modeling amps will sound pretty decent. Peavey Vypyr gets a lot of praise here. Also check out Roland Cube and Vox VT. Avoid Line 6 Spider and Marshall MG.


In the beginning I would say the most important thing is to get a guitar that feels good to play. So I would spend a bit more money on the guitar than on the amp. Decent practice amps aren't that expensive (especially if you go used), but good, cheap guitars are harder to find.

So you have c. $400 to spend on your starting rig? I would spend about $250-$300 on the guitar and $100-150 on the amp, maybe even less if you go used and find a good deal (for example I guess Roland Microcube can be had for less than $100 and it's a decent practice amp).
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#14
I like the feel of this guitar, it looks just like a strat. The cutaways are really good, I like the fast neck (though I haven't tried too many), the pickups and tone knob are lodged in place. I feel the action is a little low. Also the electronics look damn shabby. I don't think the finish will last too long. I am getting a used Orange Crush 20L within my budget, should I go with it?
#15
That is a value judgment that IMO only you can make. Think how much it is going to cost you in total, including new electronics, and have a look around at what else is available in the same price range. - I always and up changing pots and switches for better ones. The cosmetics wouldn't bother me if I liked the general look and feel, but that's a personal thing.
#16
So basically I should stick with the guitar (it's in my possession, though it's not mine muahaha) and play it for a while longer and make sure I am comfortable with the feel of the guitar before I buy it. Right? Meanwhile I shall look around for the amplifier I should buy... Will start a new thread... Am about to post a few pics of the interior of the guitar tell me your views about the wood and electronics...
Last edited by josonmj at Jan 18, 2015,
#17
So removing the back panel turned out to be a flop because I can't see shit but please tell me if you can deduce anything significant, apart from the fact that it has a floating bridge

As in, whether the body really could be solid alder as advertised and if the electronics are horribly done. I have never opened the panel of a guitar before...

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B-0eogXImQXkUGpmTks5NFlROUE&authuser=0

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B-0eogXImQXkREw5WWpxZXZZaVU&authuser=0

Please tell me if you are unable to open these links.
#18
That looks normal for a cheap strat, and it isn't something I would bother changing. All the interesting stuff is under the pickguard. Some pics of the tuners and the bridge wouldn't go amiss.

The body is solid timber of some kind, not plywood.
Last edited by Tony Done at Jan 18, 2015,
#20
#21
Quote by dazza027
Bottom E isn't in properly.


As in, the first string (thinnest)? Because I recently broke it and got it repaired. I suppose that will be covered in the servicing, which according to the store guy (different store) won't cost me more than 6 dollars even with a floating bridge...
#22
Quote by josonmj
So basically I should stick with the guitar (it's in my possession, though it's not mine muahaha) and play it for a while longer and make sure I am comfortable with the feel of the guitar before I buy it. Right? Meanwhile I shall look around for the amplifier I should buy... Will start a new thread... Am about to post a few pics of the interior of the guitar tell me your views about the wood and electronics...

Compare the guitar to other guitars in your price range. Without comparing it to others you can't be completely sure about the feel. I mean, it may feel OK, but once you try a guitar that really feels good, you can tell a clear difference and maybe the guitar will not feel that good any more. So try other guitars in the price range and pick the one that has the best feel.

Feel is the most important thing in the beginning.

And as I said, you may want to spend a bit more on the guitar than the amp. First get a guitar that feels good, then get an amp. Look at the used market.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#23
Looks like an average Strat copy. It´s probably no better or worse than your average Squier out of the affinity or bullit series.
#24
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Compare the guitar to other guitars in your price range. Without comparing it to others you can't be completely sure about the feel. I mean, it may feel OK, but once you try a guitar that really feels good, you can tell a clear difference and maybe the guitar will not feel that good any more. So try other guitars in the price range and pick the one that has the best feel.

^This. Or you could get a guitar playing friend of yours to try it out as well.
#25
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Yeah... Cheap guitars don't usually feel that great. It's not all about the tone.

When it comes to tone, your amp is the most important factor.

In the beginning tone is not the most important thing. So I would get the best feeling guitar you can find in your budget. Maybe buy it used. Then get a versatile amp. Again, the tone doesn't need to be that great. But today modeling technology is pretty good so even cheap modeling amps will sound pretty decent. Peavey Vypyr gets a lot of praise here. Also check out Roland Cube and Vox VT. Avoid Line 6 Spider and Marshall MG.


In the beginning I would say the most important thing is to get a guitar that feels good to play. So I would spend a bit more money on the guitar than on the amp. Decent practice amps aren't that expensive (especially if you go used), but good, cheap guitars are harder to find.

So you have c. $400 to spend on your starting rig? I would spend about $250-$300 on the guitar and $100-150 on the amp, maybe even less if you go used and find a good deal (for example I guess Roland Microcube can be had for less than $100 and it's a decent practice amp).


Yeah. I know everyone says "it's all about the amp", but in the beginner bracket I think the guitar is more important. As you said, a roland microcube or vox mini3 can be had for £100 or less and are versatile and sound pretty decent, at least at practise volumes. The same can't be normally said for guitars under £100.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#26
Quote by josonmj
So basically I should stick with the guitar (it's in my possession, though it's not mine muahaha) and play it for a while longer and make sure I am comfortable with the feel of the guitar before I buy it. Right?


Right. And maybe not buy it at all or for much less money.
#27
Sorry for the confusion. I meant that the hardware looks OK, and that the upgrades to the electronics could be worthwhile. However, that ia a value judgment based on how much you like the guitar, as I suggested before. I wouldn't be paying much for it though, I'm guessing around half new price.
#28
For that money you should be able to find a used Squier Classic Vibe strat or a new Squier Standard strat.

There are a whole lot of half way decent guitars around available to be negotiated down to that price.

I would totally avoid and forget about that guitar and start out with something half way decent.

You should be able to find a half way decent Vox VT15 or VT30 for what you want to pay, probably even a nicer amp.

You just have to look around for this stuff, but hanging loose and expecting this "material" that just fell in your lap to be worth anything is not showing any evidence of looking around for something half way decent.

Even paying anything for that guitar is something that may be questionable. It should probably be "free", to someone that wants to get an idea of what electric guitar is like; to be replaced with something half way decent once the person has made a decision if they want to play or not.

It is a good idea to buy the best equipment of this type that you can reasonably afford, and look around and try to talk your way into the best deals.

It is probably a good idea to leave a lot of stuff for the dump, instead of even taking it for free.
#29
Quote by josonmj
As in, the first string (thinnest)? Because I recently broke it and got it repaired. I suppose that will be covered in the servicing, which according to the store guy (different store) won't cost me more than 6 dollars even with a floating bridge...


Are you saying that you took the guitar into a shop to get a string replaced? if so this really is something you should be able to do yourself. there's loads of videos on youtube, such as:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4CtqfHmssx8

I agree with others, this isn't a guitar which you should pay any money for or any money on upgrading. See if the teacher will give you it as a gesture if you buy 10 lessons in advance or something.

Either way you should take the strings off, give the whole guitar a clean, especially the fretboard, and fit some new strings (i would suggest a standard set of 9's). It will instantly feel 100% better. They won't be doing anything more than a wipe down and fitting the strings in a $6 'service' and it's more fun to learn and do yourself.

Buy a Fender Mustang 1 and play it. Once the guitar starts feel like the limiting factor (probably a few months/year) then look at a second hand MIM strat or half decent squier if you're still into strats. Pickup upgrades will be a complete waste for a complete beginner.

Good luck!
Last edited by jecooper86 at Jan 19, 2015,
#30
I don't think any pickups are so horrible that you couldn't sound at least kind of decent. Don't upgrade the guitar - it's just not worth it. Get a better guitar and if you are not completely happy with the tone, upgrade the electronics. But if you are just starting, you will sound like crap through anything. Wait until you can play a bit better and then upgrade the electronics if they need to be upgraded. I just see no point in buying a cheap starter guitar and spending more money on the pickups than the guitar. If your guitar is worth $100, it's not worth upgrading with $130 pickups. For that money you could do a lot better (maybe not when it comes to tone but when it comes to build quality and playability). For $250 you could even get an used Fender Strat.

But yeah, don't worry about the tone right now. A lot of it is in your amp. And in the beginning you want a decent, versatile amp. Something that has different kind of tones and does lots of different styles and gives you a good idea of how a real amp will sound like. It doesn't need to sound great, it just needs to do lots of styles pretty well. Once you find your tone, get the real thing because then you know what you are looking for.

But to me it seems a bit like you want that guitar and are going to buy it no matter what. I'm not sure if we can change your opinion. It's your choice, do what you want. But if the guitar cost $115 new, don't pay more than $50 for it. Actually, as other people have said, preferably don't pay anything. If it's a crappy guitar that your teacher never uses, it really has no value to him. Or maybe don't even buy it. Borrow it and give it back to your teacher after you have bought a real guitar. I mean, does the guitar have to be your own? If it's a crappy guitar, it will just collect dust under your bed once you "grow out of it", and you'll just have more trouble selling it.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115