#1
hi all,

I have an electro acoustic, with a mix and synth going into a mixer then into loop pedal, audio interface then computer. I want to record in the most rawest, live form I can. If I was to arm as many tracks as I need, then recorded me playing the song, then used each track and mixed it according to what I wanted that track to be (vocals, synth, guitar, beatbox drums) with the background noise being the other instruments, how would that sound?

I'm trying to think a little outside the box, by creating something raw, recorded how it is performed.

What are your thoughts? Also, if this is a terrible idea, what other suggestions would you have to create a natural raw recording?

thanks
#2
No idea is a terrible idea, but to be honest I'm having a little difficulty following your train of thought.

First off, what exactly is your setup? The way you describe it now is '[guitar] - mixer - synthesizer - mixer - loop pedial - audio interface' as far as I'm able to decipher. This setup makes no sense to me. Please describe in some detail what pieces of equipment you'll be using.

Secondly, what exactly do you mean by the phrase 'recording at the same time' - are you going to beatbox, sing, play guitar and synths all at the same time (please don't think I'm trying to ridicule you, it's an honest question, I've seen it done before, but it does change a lot of variables!) If yes, then it's important for you to have separate inputs for each of these intstruments into the DAW mixer you're using if you want to mix the song after you've recorded it. If your interface has some 8 inputs then that should not be a problem at all.

Third, what do you mean by 'background noise'? If you're not recording with microphones then you won't have 'room bleed' (so the guitar microphone picking up the synthesizer or vocals too). Mixing would be a fairly straightforward process.

Fourth, are you routing all of your instruments into your looper? Does the looper have separate outputs for separate 'layers' and whatnot? If yes, then make sure to rout these outputs to separate inputs on your interface. If not, you won't be able to use the looper and retain split signals. If the looper's output is stereo or mono only then there will only be one or two tracks to be armed in your DAW in the first place. You'll have to mix your stuff on whatever mixer you're using in front of the looper.
#3
hi,

thanks for replying, my apologies for the lack of clarity. My setup is as follows: Electro acoustic, mic and synth all going into a mixer (separate channels), then the mixer output into the looper, and looper into audio interface (with input), into computer....

what I need clarity on, is I want to record my music as I play it as a performance as such at home, rather than each instrument individually if that makes sense....

i think the looper is mono, would i be able to record over a few tracks, knowing that each track will pick up each part of my performance when it occurs in the song and then mix from there???

hope that makes a bit more sense....
#4
Quote by BARTRAM2015
each track will pick up each part of my performance when it occurs in the song and then mix from there???
No you can't do this.
Mono looper = mono track, with everything on top of it.

If you want to mix everything, in your situation you gotta record everything separately.
Name's Luca.

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#5
so I couldn't arm say 5 tracks....play the whole song as a performance, and on each track mix it by focussing on the part I want to make more evident. So all tracks would have the same take on it, but the mix would focus on a certain element (track 1 vocals, track 2 guitar etc).........would this be possible with a mono looper?
#6
What do you exactly mean by "focus"?

Though if you want to properly mix stuff like this you have to record each track separately.
Either that or you play the whole thing live with the looper and you don't mix it.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#7
by focus I mean, track 1 track 2 track 3 track 4 track 5 would all have the same recording, but when mixing and mastering I would focus my attention on one aspect per track, so track 1- vocals, track 2- guitar, track 3- synth
#8
I understand what you mean now. No, you won't be able to do what you're asking to do when you use the looper within your chain the way you do now. In order for this to work you will either need a looper with multiple outputs (if you want to record 5 tracks, you should probably look for something like 8 just to be safe). I don't know if these exist in the first place though.

The other option is, as suggested, to record all the parts you would play together with your looper separately unto separate tracks in your DAW and then mix it. This would defeat your main purpose though.

The only remaining way of achieving your main goal (recording a live performance) is to mix your signals through the mixer in front of your looper. It's basically going to do the same thing, it's just that you'll need to put a LOT of time into getting all the levels right before getting a proper recording. But hey, just think of it this way: people twenty years older than me (and you, assuming you're somewhere in your 20's) basically don't know any better. If anything, mixing in front of the looper will hone your live mixing skills and give you some street cred with the old schoolers.

Good luck once more!
Last edited by Eryth at Jan 18, 2015,
#9
thanks for this....do you think the alto zephyr zmx862 would suffice??? not sure if you are familiar with it at all....
#10
I'm not familiar with 'analog' mixers at all but I feel I'm knowledgeable enough to say that yes, for your current setup it will suffice. If you have the two instruments (guitar / synth), that will take up two tracks. That leaves you with two spares for vocals or other instruments like a drum machine or something. There's an EQ for each separate track, as well as a master control. You'll have two spare tracks to do separate effects or vocals, and should be able to feed the output from the mixer into your looper, whose output will go into your computer in order to record and master everything.

I can't comment on the quality it will produce though, even though I feel this is 99% up to the person using a piece of equipment in the first place (I find it amusing that a lot of people will agree that having a $10,000 setup in your bedroom will not make you a good producer, but still say that a setup costing $200 will never get you 'professional' results - where do we draw the line between the limitations of human experience versus the limitations of technically 'inferior' or dated products? And how would we determine what's professional or not in the first place?)
Last edited by Eryth at Jan 19, 2015,