#1
So I'm starting to isolate some issues in my playing, and one of them is that I often mess up when I slide my finger(s) across the string(s)/fret(s). I don't mess up in wide variety of ways. It's just that I either go too far or too short of the note I'm trying to reach. Any ideas/tips on how to solve this?
#2
Yep, remember the 3 P's...

Practice

Practice

Practice

Edit...set up a room as dark as you can get it, pitch black is what you really want. Practice in total darkness for at least a year. Yes, I'm serious, I did it for 2 years when I was about 20 or 21. It made a huge difference.

It's all about accuracy. I also wanted to be able to watch the audience onstage instead of the guitar neck, and I wondered how guys like Jose Feliciano, Ray Charles and Stevie Wonder played totally blind. What was it like not being able to see at all?

So I set up in total darkness and practiced for about 2 years, and some of the toughest songs and leads I knew of at the time. Until I could nail them every time in the dark. Including harmonics anywhere on the neck.

That basically builds a muscle memory, your hands always know exactly where on the neck you are, your accuracy increases greatly. Including your picking hand. Practice rhythm parts, leads, slide, finger picking, whatever you do, practice it in total darkness.

It makes a huge difference.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
Last edited by Paleo Pete at Jan 18, 2015,
#3
my take...howard Roberts had a sight reading book which addressed this indirectly...play the major and minor scales on one string and then slowly start to address the intervals..

example: take the A string..play the C major scale on only that string..now your fingering is important here..at first it must be consistent..so if you going to play C D E with fingers 123 always do that until it becomes integrated in your playing..now to get to the F note on the 8th fret..use your first finger again..your going to have to reposition your hand to play the next three notes F G A and again to play the B C notes to complete the octave..when you feel confident in this pattern then begin to choose the intervals by sliding into them..say C to E then C to F C to G then D to F D to G D to A etc until you cover every note in all possible combinations..then of course do this in all keys if possible..try to play this exercise in the dark and just rely on muscle memory..after a while you should be able to locate any note from any other note on a single string fairly easily..and in time any note on any string to any other string the C D E notes on the A string and the D E F notes on the G string..

hope this helps
play well

wolf
Last edited by wolflen at Jan 18, 2015,