#1
Hey guys, need some advice as want to be sure I'm correct.

While jamming with a friend (relatively low volume btw - 2/10 on my "drive volume" and between 2 to 5 on my drive channel), my amp just cut out. The red "on" light could not be turned on, so power is clearly not reaching the amp.
Tried different kettle cables and different plug sockets, and no difference - all had no power.

Some quick research says it was likely that my fuse blew, and power tubes needs to be replaced (they are years old - barely touched my amp in the last two years, last time I used it regularly was probably around five years ago (and even then not on a regular basis at all). Started using the amp again recently, probably had an hour or two's play time in the last week before this happened).

Would it be correct in assuming this? I am going to order new HT fuses and new power tubes. I took the HT fuse out of my amp, and although I have no experience I can't see it was blown or not, it may have a small grey region on it but not sure if that's just how the wire in the middle was constructed (I will assume it has blown though regardless).

Is there anything else it is likely to be, and is this a common way for power tubes to reach the end of their lifetime?

Thanks.
Sunn O))):
Quote by Doppelgänger
You could always just sleep beside your refrigerator.

Guitar:
- Ibanez S670FM w/ JB
- Fender 'Lite Ash' Stratocaster
- Fender '72 Deluxe Telecaster
- Arbiter LP Jr. Doublecut
Amp:
- Laney VC15

'72 Tele Appreciation Group
RIP DIO
#2
Quote by Simsimius
Is there anything else it is likely to be, and is this a common way for power tubes to reach the end of their lifetime?
Your power tubes aren't necessarily blown, but your fuse likely is.

Change the fuse, and if it burns again change the power tubes before putting another fuse in there.

What amp have you got anyway?
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
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#3
Quote by Spambot_2
Your power tubes aren't necessarily blown, but your fuse likely is.

Change the fuse, and if it burns again change the power tubes before putting another fuse in there.

What amp have you got anyway?


Laney VC15. Two EL84.

I don't have any fuses - do stores sell them cheaply, or would I have to order online?
Sunn O))):
Quote by Doppelgänger
You could always just sleep beside your refrigerator.

Guitar:
- Ibanez S670FM w/ JB
- Fender 'Lite Ash' Stratocaster
- Fender '72 Deluxe Telecaster
- Arbiter LP Jr. Doublecut
Amp:
- Laney VC15

'72 Tele Appreciation Group
RIP DIO
#4
Get a pair of good EL84 just to be sure, you never know if they're gonna fail on you during something important - gig for example.

Electronic stores sell them for lotsa money considering what they are, but it's not that much absolutely - last time I paid around €3 for a pack of 8 or so fuses.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#5
Fuses aren't expensive, but if one blows the amp likely has a problem. They don't get old and wear out.

If the amp is more than 10 years old, there is a chance the electrolytic capacitors could be starting to dry out, if one goes bad and happens to create a direct short, it can fry a transformer. $100 for the cheaper one...not a cheap fix, so I'd have a tech look at it and see if something is really wrong. Have all the tubes tested, if one is weak it can cause problems. That includes rectifier and preamp tubes. It usually takes around 20 years for capacitors to start drying out, but it can happen sooner depending on how long they sat on the shelf before going into your amp.

Also pull the tubes and take a close look at the sockets. If you see black carbon traces it's been "arcing" across a tube socket, that socket needs to be replaced and you need to find out why it started arcing. That happened to my Fender Champ a couple of years ago, I replaced 3 sets of tube sockets before finally finding out it had a bad rectifier tube and probably a bad capacitor as well. Blew several fuses too...

I'd say have a good tech look at it, when it blows a fuse there's a reason.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
Last edited by Paleo Pete at Jan 19, 2015,