#1
I've been trying to write some pop-punk in the style of The Story So Far, Real Friends, State Champs, etc, but I haven't been making much progress. Does anybody have any tips they would mind passing along? Thanks in advance.
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#2
For starters try out various combinations of I, IV, V, and vi.
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#3
Learn Pop Punk songs. Figure out what you like, don't like, etc. Use those techniques in your songwriting.
#5
Consciously attempt to write things that are a blatant ripoff of those bands as a training exercise.

Really break down their music (not just learn the chords), and try to get inside the thought processes and techniques they use. Imagine their songwriting style like a large playbook, and try to learn some specific plays from it.

God sports analogies are so applicable to music and I love it
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#6
Thanks for the feedback guys! I've already made some progress in writing, slowly but surely. Anybody got reccomendations for good chords, besides the standard power chords?
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#7
Well there's the thing. You don't necessarily want to be looking for "new" chords.

You'll be totally fine with just major and minor chords with the occasional 7th. The trick is to learn what chords go in which key, and how to use chords that don't quite fit in the key effectively.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#9
Quote by twostoomany
Anybody got recommendations for good chords, besides the standard power chords?
Had a quick listen to the bands you listed and I think I know what you mean about chords other than the usual power type.

Here's an interview you might find helpful for looking for notes outside the usual standards,
as yes, the bands you listed are also using extra colour in their chords.

youtube.com/watch?v=AJDUHq2mJx0

Also try incorporating open strings into your chords:
Here's an excerpt from Mastodon's The Mother Load: (just before the lead break).

Mastodon - The Motherload

e |-----------0-----|-----------0-----|
B |---------6---6---|---------6---6---|
G |-------7-------7-|-------7-------7-|
d |-----8-----------|-----8-----------|
A |-----------------|-----------------|
D |-8---------------|-5---------------|

e |-----------0-----|-----------0-----|
B |---------0---0---|---------0---0---|
G |-------6-------6-|-------6-------6-|
d |-----7-----------|-----7-----------|
A |-----------------|-----------------|
D |-7---------------|-7---------------|
hope it helps!
#10
To add variety, sometimes play arpeggios, sometimes just strum chords. Change the rhythm. It doesn't need to be straight 8ths or 16ths all the time. Add rests - they make the music breathe, and they also add "groove".

Use major and minor chords - maybe add some 7ths. As said above, you can add open strings to your chords. You could play your basic barre chords, but leave some strings open (for example the high E and B strings).

Listen to what your favorite bands do.
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