#1
Hello,

I am wanting to learn the movable box patterns for the E Aeolian scale, I've gone on three different websites and they are all different, I don't want to spend time learning the wrong notes if any one could please send me a link or provide diagrams for the E Aeolian scale box shapes I would really appreciate it, if anyone else could also confirm they are correct that would be awesome, thanks!
#2
E aeolian is the same thing as E minor (and actually today it's preferable to speak about minor because of keys, but let's not get into that). Just name the notes in the scale, then find the notes on the fretboard. I'm sure all of the scale shapes you have found are correct but they may just be starting on different frets or whatever. The same scale can be played in any position. The notes are all over the fretboard.

There are only 12 different notes you can play on a guitar. They just repeat in different octaves. The minor scale has seven notes in it. E minor scale is E, F#, G, A, B, C and D. Just find these notes and build your own shapes. Or figure out if the scale shapes that you have been looking at have these notes. There is no one correct shape for the scale - you can play it in many different positions. Also, there are the CAGED shapes and then there are the 3 notes per string shapes, which are exactly the same notes but with a bit different fingerings.

Here's the E minor scale, starting on the open low E string (root notes are bold):

e|-----------------------------[B]0[/B]-2-3-
B|-----------------------0-1-3-------
G|-------------------0-2-------------
D|-------------0-[B]2[/B]-4-----------------
A|-------0-2-3-----------------------
E|-[B]0[/B]-2-3-----------------------------


As you can see, it reminds a lot of the basic Em pentatonic shape. It just has a couple of added notes (actually only two different notes - Em pentatonic is E G A B D, Em is E F# G A B C D).

e|---------------------[B]0[/B]-3-
B|-----------------0-3-----
G|-------------0-2---------
D|---------0-[B]2[/B]-------------
A|-----0-2-----------------
E|-[B]0[/B]-3---------------------


I would suggest learning about scale construction. That way you can figure out the shapes on your own or even build your own shapes.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#3
You're looking for the wrong thing. Aeolian is just the modal name for the natural minor scale. They are the same exact notes. I'm sure you can find tons of box shapes for E minor seeing how it's one of the most used scales on the guitar.
#4
Exactly, its the same notes as G major.

Take the pent. shapes and add the two missing notes; that'll get you started. You may also find it easier to keep the half steps on the same strings, at least until all the shapes start to bleed together and you break out of the boxes.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#6
Looks good to me, but I would take the C note on the B string and put it on the G string, so you don't have to change positions.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#7
E F# G A B C D E - E Aeolian.
Same notes of a E minor scale (and a G major scale). Only one accidental, the F#. If you know the C major or A minor scales you really only have to play one note differently.

Quote by MaggaraMarine
E aeolian is the same thing as E minor (and actually today it's preferable to speak about minor because of keys, but let's not get into that)

They are not the same my friend, this is a very common misconception. Aeolian is a mode derived from the medieval days, a lot which had to do with instruments being unable to play chromatically. It is a function, or "mode", of a diatonic key. For example, A aeolian is a mode of C major. The reason why aeolian and minor keys are different is because minor keys have the ability to raise and low the 6th and 7th intervals. The natural minor scale (which has the same notes as aeolian mode, probably another reason why the two get confused or are called the same), melodic minor scale, and harmonic minor scale are just three of the possible scales used in a minor key. Which pitches are used is dependent upon harmonic context. Even though minor keys use the same key signatures as major keys, you'll notice in a lot (like a looooooot) of music written in minor keys uses several accidentals, especially at cadences.
Last edited by mhillips at Jan 20, 2015,
#8
I think when Maggara says they are the same, he means that E Aeolian contains the same pitches as a natural minor scale. Like what 4th Horseman said.

If OP is still in the process of beginning to learn scales, let's not turn this into a mode thread.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#9
Yes, I meant they have the same notes (the scales). And TS is most likely talking about the natural minor scale, not the aeolian mode.

Also, modes aren't restricted to only seven notes. You can use accidentals in modal music too (to avoid certain intervals). But yeah, let's not get into that.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#10
Please no.

Although one day someone will actually ask about that stuff and we're all going to freak out.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#11
Quote by mhillips
They are not the same my friend, this is a very common misconception. Aeolian is a mode derived from the medieval days, a lot which had to do with instruments being unable to play chromatically.

[words]

And they are the same thing in practicality, so stfu.
#12
+1 but in a nicer tone of voice.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#13
Quote by Frenetixx
Hello,

I am wanting to learn the movable box patterns for the E Aeolian scale, I've gone on three different websites and they are all different, I don't want to spend time learning the wrong notes if any one could please send me a link or provide diagrams for the E Aeolian scale box shapes I would really appreciate it, if anyone else could also confirm they are correct that would be awesome, thanks!
Thinking of "E minor" as, "E Aeolian", is sort of making things more difficult than they need to be. I mean, it's a wonderful, even lyrical , name for the damned old common natural relative minor of G major.

To learn, "moveable positions", is to know the names of the notes on the fret board, and while "shapes" are good to know, they're only one part of the puzzle.

"Aeolian" (mode or otherwise), is just the name of the scale which begins on the 6th degree of any major scale.

In today's more often used terminology, the scale beginning on the 6th note of the major scale is called, "the relative minor", and every key has one.

In fact, the "shape" that governs a scale, can be either major or minor.

Everyone knows how to play, "E pentatonic" at the open position. Well, those same notes, are also, "G major pentatonic". All we need do, is substitute the chord G major for E minor, and have the perhaps brighter key of G major, using all the same notes.

Now, when you see a scale written out in this form, (as in your link), 1, 2, 3, b4, 5, 6, 7, al it's doing is really telling you the pattern of fret steps you need to form a particular scale. My example is that of a major scale.

When "modal" scales are written, they assume the same root note, and then tell you how many steps at a time to ascend the scale. All of those number patterns will be different, given the same root note.

It's too much for a beginner to wrap his or her head around starting out. It also requires quite a bit of interval ear training as well, for the maximum benefit

Learn a major scale, count up 6 notes, there's the name your relative minor. One octave of the relative minor will use the same notes as the major scale, you simply start and end the scale, on the 6th.

It all gets easier once you memorize the combinations. Here's a few:

C major, A minor
D major, B minor
E major, C# minor
F major , D minor
G major, E minor
A major, F# minor

Now, as you can see the relative minors track the major keys. If you raise the major key 1 whole tone, the minor goes up 1 whole tone also.

THEY ALSO SHARE THE SAME KEY SIGNATURES! And you'll need to learn a few common chord progressions, to ascertain the actual key. But an often followed basic rule of thumb is, the song ends on G major, the key is G. The song ends on E minor, it's E minor.

So, learn the notes on the fret board, and learn the notes in the major scales, then the "shapes" and "Aeolian mode", will automatically sort themselves out for you.

Not really mysterious at all
#14
Quote by mhillips
E F# G A B C D E - E Aeolian.
Same notes of a E minor scale (and a G major scale). Only one accidental, the F#. If you know the C major or A minor scales you really only have to play one note differently.


They are not the same my friend, this is a very common misconception. Aeolian is a mode derived from the medieval days, a lot which had to do with instruments being unable to play chromatically. It is a function, or "mode", of a diatonic key. For example, A aeolian is a mode of C major. The reason why aeolian and minor keys are different is because minor keys have the ability to raise and low the 6th and 7th intervals. The natural minor scale (which has the same notes as aeolian mode, probably another reason why the two get confused or are called the same), melodic minor scale, and harmonic minor scale are just three of the possible scales used in a minor key. Which pitches are used is dependent upon harmonic context. Even though minor keys use the same key signatures as major keys, you'll notice in a lot (like a looooooot) of music written in minor keys uses several accidentals, especially at cadences.


What a heap of unnecessary, irrelevant and over-condensed information.

The original poster was most probably simply needing a few shapes or patterns from something that would be better referred to as E minor. For this purpose, E Aeolian and E minor are the same thing.

EDIT: Multiple ninjas noted.
Last edited by Jehannum at Jan 23, 2015,