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#1
Hello UG !

For quite some time I have been dabbling with the idea of making a guitarpedal that is able to tell the user how worn their strings are.

The pedal itself is made from an waypost I found in the Netherlands.
I sawed up the piece of wood and hollowed it out, such that I could put in some hardware.

I then put in a small computer (rpi), an audio interface (usb) and installed a push-button and some leds to indicate the level of wear.
The small computer runs linux, so I wrote my program in Python

The last post I posted got closed down so I am reluctant to post even a link for my build log, so instead I have attached a few pictures with this post, please check it out!

I imagine that my pedal could be used like this: Imagine you bought a new set of strings. At first you don't like them but after having played them for a while you think that they sound really great !
Now imagine that you could pick up a set of strings that already sounds just like you want them to - that's why I invented my prototype (I don't think I am even allowed to say the name of the pedal, sorry).

Right now I'm looking for input concerning the build of my pedal. Do you guys have som recommendations for a different design, or different hardware?

Maybe a different way of showing the level of wear? I mean, right now there are only 5 leds, thus making the scale between "brand new" and "worn" a very small one.


So PLEASE comment, any input is greatly appreciated !
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#2
I can't speak for everyone, but I wouldn't buy it. All I have to do is feel my string and I know when they need to be changed

You also need to be more specific, like does it work on any string material/gauge/type? If so is there a selector switch or LCD to help pick the different settings?
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Last edited by Robbgnarly at Jan 20, 2015,
#3
Hi, thanks for updating the thread, links and names of products are ok. Just wanted to make sure you were giving some information in the thread beyond trying to convince people to contribute to the kickstarter.

My questions would be -
-What method are you using to track string wear?
-What sort of memory is available? Could it keep track of my preferences for different brands and gauges, or do I have to do that myself?
-What advantages does this pedal have over simply, say, writing down hours of play wear on the strings and whether they sound good?

I think more segments for % wear (or whatever unit is being used) would be good.

Can you tell us more about what the pedal actually does? It is tough to imagine the utility of a pedal when its function is not quite clear.
#4
Quote by Robbgnarly
I can't speak for everyone, but I wouldn't buy it. All I have to do is feel my string and I know when they need to be changed


I agree with this. Just by briefly hearing, feeling, and looking at your strings should be enough to determine when it's time. That and just remembering how long it usually takes.

The wood pedal does look very interesting though. If you decorated it with wood burning tools it could potentially look awesome.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#5
I'd honestly make this into a cellphone app. You could make it free for the cheap skates all over the planet but advertise in it so you'd at least make some money.

Not sure how you'd go about doing this as I'm no audio engineer. But an app is going to be way cheaper than a pedal and you'll make money regardless on it. Beats going to the post office constantly and so forth. Unless you get in contact with korg or a tuner company, patent a way to determine new vs old strings and put that into a guitar tuner as an option. Dunlop to Ernie Ball are going to love you for it.

But yeah I wish you luck in this. I'd just put a small piece of tape on the back of the headstock or get into routine to change strings. I know some people locally who are so cheap they boil their strings in ammonia. I have a great string supplier I can tell people about to the point I just toss them after a month or so (I own lots of guitars).
Last edited by Tallwood13 at Jan 20, 2015,
#6
Quote by Tallwood13
I'd honestly make this into a cellphone app. You could make it free for the cheap skates all over the planet but advertise in it so you'd at least make some money.

Not sure how you'd go about doing this as I'm no audio engineer. But an app is going to be way cheaper than a pedal and you'll make money regardless on it. Beats going to the post office constantly and so forth. Unless you get in contact with korg or a tuner company, patent a way to determine new vs old strings and put that into a guitar tuner as an option. Dunlop to Ernie Ball are going to love you for it.

But yeah I wish you luck in this. I'd just put a small piece of tape on the back of the headstock or get into routine to change strings. I know some people locally who are so cheap they boil their strings in ammonia. I have a great string supplier I can tell people about to the point I just toss them after a month or so (I own lots of guitars).

Mind explaining that tape idea? I'm not clear what you meant, but you caught my attention.

Also, LOVE the idea of wooden pedals. Guitars are wood, some amps have wooden faces (PRS), so why not wooden pedals? Can't believe I'm discovering that for the first time.
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Last edited by BledGhostWhite at Jan 21, 2015,
#7
am i the only one that thinks this pedal would be completely useless? i thought most people could just strum a chord and tell if their strings needed changing
#8
I feel it's pretty clear what you want the stompbox to do, and I actually do sort of like the idea if it enables me to prevent old strings from breaking - it's just that I'm having a lot of trouble figuring out exactly how a stompbox would determine string wear. What would it 'look' for or 'hear' that strings are old? Would it 'smell' that they're rusty or something? Would it tell me my strings need changing instantly if I use a D'addario Chromes set (flatwounds) for example? Or does it have some sort of timer - in which case, why wouldn't I just put a calendar event on my smartphone to go off every so many days, weeks, months, etc?

More importantly, how does one go about determining 'string wear' and the right point to change strings in the first place? I know people who actually enjoy the sound and feel of months old strings and won't even consider looking at a new pack of strings before at least 3 old ones break and I know people who will go crazy from their tone after playing some 12 hours on a new set (I'm somewhere in the middle - I love the sound of new strings but I have to be pragmatic with my money :P )
Last edited by Eryth at Jan 21, 2015,
#9
Can I also get a pedal that tells me how dirty my jeans are so that I'll know if I need to wash them?
Originally posted by primusfan
When you crank up the gain to 10 and switch to the lead channel, it actually sounds like you are unjustifiably bombing an innocent foreign land.


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#10
Quote by Marcus T
Hello UG !

For quite some time I have been dabbling with the idea of making a guitarpedal that is able to tell the user how worn their strings are.

The pedal itself is made from an waypost I found in the Netherlands.
I sawed up the piece of wood and hollowed it out, such that I could put in some hardware.

I then put in a small computer (rpi), an audio interface (usb) and installed a push-button and some leds to indicate the level of wear.
The small computer runs linux, so I wrote my program in Python

The last post I posted got closed down so I am reluctant to post even a link for my build log, so instead I have attached a few pictures with this post, please check it out!

I imagine that my pedal could be used like this: Imagine you bought a new set of strings. At first you don't like them but after having played them for a while you think that they sound really great !
Now imagine that you could pick up a set of strings that already sounds just like you want them to - that's why I invented my prototype (I don't think I am even allowed to say the name of the pedal, sorry).

Right now I'm looking for input concerning the build of my pedal. Do you guys have som recommendations for a different design, or different hardware?

Maybe a different way of showing the level of wear? I mean, right now there are only 5 leds, thus making the scale between "brand new" and "worn" a very small one.


So PLEASE comment, any input is greatly appreciated !


Seems quite an ingenious idea.

I don't think I'd trust anything more than 5 LEDs. I wouldn't believe it could be more accurate than that. I assume it assesses the strength of very high harmonic overtones (I don't think a mobile phone mic could pick these up, so it would have to be a pedal, not a phone app).

What would be good is if sufficient research could determine whether a string is actually about to break. A flashing LED would be a nice early warning!

But a more practical suggestion is to combine it with a tuner. People already buy tuners. This one would have some very interesting extra functionality!
#11
Hey again!

First of all, thank you very much for your honest opinions, that really means a lot to me !

Secondly, I saw that I am allowed to post links. The pedal is called TeString (Test & String) and the main website is www.testring.dk
If you want to see some more pictures of the build log you can do that right here

Now, to answer some of your great questions !
#12
Quote by Robbgnarly
I can't speak for everyone, but I wouldn't buy it. All I have to do is feel my string and I know when they need to be changed

You also need to be more specific, like does it work on any string material/gauge/type? If so is there a selector switch or LCD to help pick the different settings?


I totally understand that this is a niche product!
In principle it should be possible to modify it to work for ANY stringed instrument, even pianos and such.
And thus, yes, any material/gauge/type.

But you are right, the calculated quantity might be different for different instruments.
So far I have only tried it with electric guitars.


Again, I understand your way of just feeling the strings to know when to change them, totally!


As I wrote in the first post:

Imagine you bought a new set of strings. At first you don't like them but after having played them for a while you think that they sound really great !
Now imagine that you could pick up a set of strings that already sounds just like you want them to.

To do this you first need to know the TS (TeString) value of the strings when you really like them, so that you can go to the music shop and find strings with (nearly) the same number on the back.
#13
Quote by Roc8995
Hi, thanks for updating the thread, links and names of products are ok. Just wanted to make sure you were giving some information in the thread beyond trying to convince people to contribute to the kickstarter.

My questions would be -
-What method are you using to track string wear?
-What sort of memory is available? Could it keep track of my preferences for different brands and gauges, or do I have to do that myself?
-What advantages does this pedal have over simply, say, writing down hours of play wear on the strings and whether they sound good?

I think more segments for % wear (or whatever unit is being used) would be good.

Can you tell us more about what the pedal actually does? It is tough to imagine the utility of a pedal when its function is not quite clear.


No problem

- The method is a work in progress but I can tell you that much that I spend around half a year developing this in my bachelor thesis (I study physics).

- I have gotten this great suggestion before, and yes of course it will be possible to save the TS value right when you think the strings sound best. Read my reply above to see just why this is awesome!
The current device is very barebone but I could simply make some changes to my code, such that when you press the switch for x amount of seconds, the current TS value is saved.
To expand this to different types of instrument I would probably need to install some kind of display to incorporate in the pedal, just like @Robbgnarly suggested

- Most people I know do not write down hours of play. Furthermore, the wear of strings does not only depend on how much you play them (though it's the biggest factor of course). It also depends on how you store your guitar, is it very hot and humid in the room and such?
And believe it or not, it also depends, in a lesser part, if you play mostly rythm or soloing stuff.
As I told @Robbgnarly I know this is niche product, with the main goal of being able to go to a store and grab strings that you already know you will love. (Please read my more eloborate answer above).


Finally, yes, +1 for more segments, that's also what I thought

Well, the pedal records, analyses the frequency spectrum and outputs a number corresponding to a led light in real-time.
#14
Quote by theogonia777
I agree with this. Just by briefly hearing, feeling, and looking at your strings should be enough to determine when it's time. That and just remembering how long it usually takes.

The wood pedal does look very interesting though. If you decorated it with wood burning tools it could potentially look awesome.


I understand that most people just feel the strings, please read my reply to @Robbgnarly about "my ideal scenario"

And thank you ! I also really like the idea of making a wodden pedal (I know it has been done before, but not like this)
#15
Quote by Tallwood13
I'd honestly make this into a cellphone app. You could make it free for the cheap skates all over the planet but advertise in it so you'd at least make some money.

Not sure how you'd go about doing this as I'm no audio engineer. But an app is going to be way cheaper than a pedal and you'll make money regardless on it. Beats going to the post office constantly and so forth. Unless you get in contact with korg or a tuner company, patent a way to determine new vs old strings and put that into a guitar tuner as an option. Dunlop to Ernie Ball are going to love you for it.

But yeah I wish you luck in this. I'd just put a small piece of tape on the back of the headstock or get into routine to change strings. I know some people locally who are so cheap they boil their strings in ammonia. I have a great string supplier I can tell people about to the point I just toss them after a month or so (I own lots of guitars).


This is also a very valid point !
And you are very right, that would definitely be cheaper on my part.

This is a one-man enterprise and thus I cannot afford to get a patent here in Denmark. I actually plan on making this opensource when it's done (if I was going for only making pedals).
And yeah, also heard about people boiling their strings, mostly bassplayers though (guess their strings can be more expensive).

Suppose I did make it into an app, what would you like of features in it?
#16
Quote by BledGhostWhite

Also, LOVE the idea of wooden pedals. Guitars are wood, some amps have wooden faces (PRS), so why not wooden pedals? Can't believe I'm discovering that for the first time.



Thank you so much! Well, it's a lot of work to carve out (please check the build log ) unless you have a cnc milling machine at hand.
But I also really like this.

I have come to realize, though, that I am not the first one to make guitarpedals in wood, although I have never seen anyone doing it quite like this!
#17
Quote by calebspratley
am i the only one that thinks this pedal would be completely useless? i thought most people could just strum a chord and tell if their strings needed changing


I know !
Please read my reply to @Robbgnarly about why the use of TeString could be very awesome for musicians ! Basically you will be able to pick up a brand new set of strings that you can now know, just by reading the TS value, you'll love.

With this it will also be possible to put different brands of strings to the test, such that you are able to determine which brand gives the best string longevity.
#18
Quote by Eryth
I feel it's pretty clear what you want the stompbox to do, and I actually do sort of like the idea if it enables me to prevent old strings from breaking - it's just that I'm having a lot of trouble figuring out exactly how a stompbox would determine string wear. What would it 'look' for or 'hear' that strings are old? Would it 'smell' that they're rusty or something? Would it tell me my strings need changing instantly if I use a D'addario Chromes set (flatwounds) for example? Or does it have some sort of timer - in which case, why wouldn't I just put a calendar event on my smartphone to go off every so many days, weeks, months, etc?

More importantly, how does one go about determining 'string wear' and the right point to change strings in the first place? I know people who actually enjoy the sound and feel of months old strings and won't even consider looking at a new pack of strings before at least 3 old ones break and I know people who will go crazy from their tone after playing some 12 hours on a new set (I'm somewhere in the middle - I love the sound of new strings but I have to be pragmatic with my money :P )


This is great !

And you are absolutely right about people having different taste in the sound of the strings. That's exactly my point !

Imagine that you buy a set of brand new strings. You play them for awhile until YOU think they sound awesome!
You can then use TeString to get a value for just how worn your strings are right now.

Then, when string companies begin using TeString, they will make strings with different grades of wear.

So you go to a music store and look for new strings that has a factory TS value as close to the one you really enjoy!

That's the real value of TeString, I think. So you can consistently find the strings with the sound you love.

And no, the pedal doesn't smell anything :P
It records, analyses the frequency spectrum and outputs the result.
Flatwounds should not be an issue, though !

So no, there's no timer.
#19
Quote by ibanezguitars44
Can I also get a pedal that tells me how dirty my jeans are so that I'll know if I need to wash them?


Haha actually made me laugh Thanks !

As I have written in some of the other answers:

Imagine that you buy a set of brand new strings. You play them for awhile until YOU think they sound awesome!
You can then use TeString to get a value for just how worn your strings are right now.

Then, when string companies begin using TeString, they will make strings with different grades of wear.

So you go to a music store and look for new strings that has a factory TS value as close to the one you really enjoy!

That's the real value of TeString, I think. So you can consistently find the strings with the sound you love.
#20
Quote by Jehannum
Seems quite an ingenious idea.

I don't think I'd trust anything more than 5 LEDs. I wouldn't believe it could be more accurate than that. I assume it assesses the strength of very high harmonic overtones (I don't think a mobile phone mic could pick these up, so it would have to be a pedal, not a phone app).

What would be good is if sufficient research could determine whether a string is actually about to break. A flashing LED would be a nice early warning!

But a more practical suggestion is to combine it with a tuner. People already buy tuners. This one would have some very interesting extra functionality!


This is exactly why I chose to post on UG first. You really have some knowledge of the things you speak of!

Everything you say is sweet music for my ears. You are right about the higher harmonics, this is something I am looking into at the moment, but it was not the starting for me.

I sincerely hope to get a better resolution with my improved technique and yes indeed, making it flash if the strings doom is imminent!

I actually thought that it would go perfectly inside a polytune so I contacted that company (their headquarters lies just 2 km from where I live) but they have not responded.
That's partly why I chose to go this direction first. To get some feedback from people, if they are interested in this sort of thing.

Then I will have a much better chance of getting in contact with the big companies.
#21
Quote by Marcus T

Imagine that you buy a set of brand new strings. You play them for awhile until YOU think they sound awesome!
You can then use TeString to get a value for just how worn your strings are right now.

Then, when string companies begin using TeString, they will make strings with different grades of wear.

So you go to a music store and look for new strings that has a factory TS value as close to the one you really enjoy!


Thanks for the clarification dude! I kind of figured that the pedal would be looking at frequency responses/harmonic overtones and the like. I hate to be a sceptic because I love out-of-the-box ideas like this but I still have a hard time imagining how this would work in practice (i.e. translate to new sets of strings). Because strings deteriorate constantly. There is no point at which the string gets its 'tone' after which it stops changing. With each stroke of your pick, with each movement of your fretting hand, you will leave residue, the metal will wear and stretch a little bit more - you get the point.

The idea itself is pretty cool, appears to have a solid theoretical foundation and is very achievable, so by all means: construct it! I just feel that the ideas you put around it are feasible. I have a hard time imagining that such deterioration stops at one point or another, or that one could produce strings at this or that point of deterioration (because how would one go about achieving 'artificial deterioration'? When I look at my strings there are very specific places where they are worn out more than others: near the bridge pickup where I pick the strings, near the frets because of the constant contact between the strings and the frets, near the nut because of the scraping because of endless tuning. The string won't deteriorate evenly all accross the board, which will add as well as take away from the overall tone. Not to mention the fact that EVERYBODY has a different playing style, so everybody's strings will deteriorate differently! Besides that, aiming for sets of strings which are offered at this or that point of 'deterioration' feels a little awkward I guess, since basically they would just be strings with a reduced lifespan, right?
Last edited by Eryth at Jan 21, 2015,
#22
Quote by Eryth
Thanks for the clarification dude! I kind of figured that the pedal would be looking at frequency responses/harmonic overtones and the like. I hate to be a sceptic because I love out-of-the-box ideas like this but I still have a hard time imagining how this would work in practice (i.e. translate to new sets of strings). Because strings deteriorate constantly. There is no point at which the string gets its 'tone' after which it stops changing. With each stroke of your pick, with each movement of your fretting hand, you will leave residue, the metal will wear and stretch a little bit more - you get the point.

The idea itself is pretty cool, appears to have a solid theoretical foundation and is very achievable, so by all means: construct it! I just feel that the ideas you put around it are feasible. I have a hard time imagining that such deterioration stops at one point or another, or that one could produce strings at this or that point of deterioration (because how would one go about achieving 'artificial deterioration'? When I look at my strings there are very specific places where they are worn out more than others: near the bridge pickup where I pick the strings, near the frets because of the constant contact between the strings and the frets, near the nut because of the scraping because of endless tuning. The string won't deteriorate evenly all accross the board, which will add as well as take away from the overall tone. Not to mention the fact that EVERYBODY has a different playing style, so everybody's strings will deteriorate differently! Besides that, aiming for sets of strings which are offered at this or that point of 'deterioration' feels a little awkward I guess, since basically they would just be strings with a reduced lifespan, right?


You are right in everything you are saying.
I don't expect the strings to just stop deteorating when you get to the point you really like

But with this, you don't have to wait as long until your strings sound like you want them to. Yes, you could call that strings with reduced lifespans, of course. But the lifespan you get will be much closer to the range of tone that you want. And it would be so the instance you put on the strings.

Of course there are many unknowns, but I think this idea has some merit and I'm pretty sure that in some way you could come up with a form of "deteorating mechanism" such as to make strings "pre deteorated".

They will of course deteorate differently, but the TS value will correspond to a certain sound, so I don't consider that a problem.


This is of course just one use for TeString. Originally I had the idea of string producers using this to quality test their new strings. So they can measure how close to a perfect (in the physical sense) their strings, just after fabrication.


But to get any such company interested, I need some form of feedback from somewhere, to convince them. That's also why I'm writing in here.

Hope that answered your questions ! Please feel free to ask anything else. I appreciate all the input I can get !
#23
Ok, but right now there is no integration with string companies. And I'm not sure there will be, I can't imagine they'll flock to the idea of adding extra steps to the manufacturing process in order to sell worn strings to the small population of people willing to spend $100 on a pedal that tells them their strings are old.

So, without that portion, what do we really have? A device that allegedly tells me when my strings are worn, which is something I'm fairly capable of on my own, for free. If I raise my pickups a bit, or bump my tone knob, or use a different pick, will that fool the detection software? It's hard to be convinced when we don't know at all what the software actually does. Even if it worked perfectly, how many guitarists do you think are willing to pay so much extra just to avoid a day or two of break-in time on their strings?

Sure, for the first day or two after a string change they have a bit of sizzle, and then at the end of their life they're too dull, but I don't need a pedal to tell me that, and in between, I just don't care that much if I'm at 64% or 71 or 85. What use is the TS value to me if I can't buy a string with those values? I'm not convinced they have any application for most guitarists. Do you have any data to suggest that strings really sound significantly different beyond the first few hours and the end-of-life period?
#24
Quote by Roc8995
Do you have any data to suggest that strings really sound significantly different beyond the first few hours and the end-of-life period?


It seems to me that as strings age and get very worn they do lose some of their voice and sound more dull. It is possible that as the strings age they might be reducing the magnitude of various harmonics that lead to this dull sound. I don't have data to support this change, just anecdotal evidence of what I hear.

Assuming they lose harmonics, and that they are lost in the same way as they age, you could likely have someone strum the strings in order and do an FFT or some other transform on the signal and use that to determine age of strings. Not sure why you would need a pedal for it.

It might make an interesting app on a phone, but only really as a way to see if you should pick up guitar strings while your our at the store.
Last edited by XgamerGt04 at Jan 21, 2015,
#25
wooden pedals would be cool but the "Tape idea" in otherwords like you put on the back of the headstock a little piece of electric tape and write down the date the strings were re-strung on it.

I like the app idea or patent something and show it off to like Korg like a sensor to tell how new your strings are added onto a chromatic tuner like the CA-30 or whatever it is for Korg. I'm mentioning it as it's the closest tuner to me.
#26
Quote by XgamerGt04
It seems to me that as strings age and get very worn they do lose some of their voice and sound more dull. It is possible that as the strings age they might be reducing the magnitude of various harmonics that lead to this dull sound. I don't have data to support this change, just anecdotal evidence of what I hear.

That's fair, and it's not reasonable to ask for actual hard data, but I guess what I was getting at was "is it really that much of a problem? Do we have a reason to think that this is a legitimate concern for people?"

Plus, even if it is, surely it's a metallurgy issue (or just picking another kind of string) and not a question of measurement. The pedal is sort of silly if it just tells you to buy a new set of half-worn-out strings every week, no? Especially if such a product doesn't actually exist.

I agree with a lot of the comments above that this could be a neat phone app or add-on software to an existing product. As a standalone it seems like a tough sell, and the notion that string makers are going to pick it up as a way to sell people a product that nobody seems to have asked for is rather optimistic, if not a complete pipe dream. If it could help you pick a different kind of string - steel wrap, pure nickel, groundwound - that might be something they'd be interested in. Worn-out strings are probably not high on their list of potential products.
#27
I love the sound of brand new Ernie Ball Slinky 10s on my guitars. As they get older they don't sound as good to me even two or three days later. A few weeks down the road (depending on how often I have played that guitar) l will keep playing it till it gets to a point of really bothering me a lot. That's when I change them.

It comes down to two factors for me : 1. Since I own quite a few guitars, is it cost effective to change them more often. and 2. Will my lazy ass actually do it more often.

I already know the point at which I like the sound of my strings. Brand new strings always sound better to me. Having something that tells me my strings aren't new an interesting idea but not something I don't already know. My ears tell quite clearly. I appreciate the thought going into the idea though and think this idea may have other applications. .
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Jan 22, 2015,
#28
@Everyone

I appreciated your honesty !
The critique and suggestions means a lot, so thank you very much!

@XgamerGt04 That's more or less what I'm doing, inside the pedal.

But yeah, seems the consensus is: either make an app or try to incorporate into an already existing product.

I see that it will be difficult to sell as a stand alone unit.

But I appreciate that most people here does not totally discard the idea but instead you actually give some proper advise, that's very welcome !
#29
A few people suggest it would be a nice to have feature in a tuner pedal.
So why not extend what you have done already to add a tuner to it.?
That way you would be more likely to be able to sell it as a standalone unit.

I can also see it having an application at a string manufacturer.
But, rather than using the TS value a marketing gimmick, it could be used
to make sure that each batch of strings they produce is consistent.

For example if the manufacturer made sure the TS value they measured for every
batch of strings they made was the same as (or was very close to) the TS value from the previous batches, they could ensure that any changes they made to their manufacturing processes / the materials they used did not effect the sound of the final product.

That way, every time someone buys a new pack of a particular brand of strings,
they would always sounds the same from one packet to the next.

So it may still be worth at least trying to contact string manufacturers to see if whether this is something they already do at their factories and if not they might be interested in it.

Although I suspect it is likely that string manufacturers already have processes in place that monitor quality and consistency of their products, but I could be wrong!
#30
I should probably reveal that I'm working on something like this for a new edition of the MinETune (GForce/GString) for Gibson and that there are existing patents and trademarks registered.

It will be part of the MinETune and will detect changes in the electrical nature of the string itself over time and compare them to the stored information on the same string as new. Several data sets will be available, depending on the string sets you're using, along with some custom user data sets for those using custom string gauges, etc.

Three LEDs (green, yellow, red) will indicate "still new," "getting tatty," and "time to restring." Please refer to our handouts and press releases being distributed at the NAMM show just now underway in Anaheim, CA.

Further developments will include adding a small electric shock to the user if he's callously exceeding the red limit. We're not sure that this will actually be implemented (liability lawyers are still working this one over). We're also investigating a string "spool" setup that will store spools of a common string gauge inside the guitar itself (Gibson LPs are largely hollowed out these days, so we have space to work with). This will actually allow automatic restringing, with a version of the Planet Waves locking tuners' cutoff setup part of the motorized system. This will obviously be able to be disabled for gigs and for long term storage (wouldn't do to come back from a long vacation and find lengths of string lying about next to a guitar stand) and for guitars stored around cats. Again, the liability lawyers have asked us to ensure that small children and idiot users won't have their eyes poked out should they be close (say, investigating the whirring noises coming from the guitar) when the restringing actually happens. We're considering a motion detector, a proximity alarm and possibly a sonic detector (dogs). We've already incorporated an RFID reader to detect animals who've been "chipped," and we're encouraging having small children chipped in the same way. Some have proposed a breathalyzer to prevent string changes during owner inebriation episodes. Yet another proposal is a small storage compartment for vapor corrosion inhibition chemistry at each end of the string (this would require changing on a yearly basis) to help extend string life in a closed environment such as a guitar case.
#33
Quote by Roc8995
That's fair, and it's not reasonable to ask for actual hard data, but I guess what I was getting at was "is it really that much of a problem? Do we have a reason to think that this is a legitimate concern for people?"


You know... I used to think the same thing about a lot of products that have been made and sell really well. For all we know this could take off and be a million dollar idea. The more I think about it I could see a phone type app being really useful at a large guitar store that tries to keep its stock in good condition or for traveling acts.

The thought about different composition of strings and helping someone find out if they would like another better is interesting though. I would assume it should work the same way since it is all based on doing an FFT likely.
#34
Quote by Rickholly74
Now that's innovation. The auto string plucker obviously didn't work out.


Actually it did, but Marketing threw us a bit. Apparently they thought that our working project title, "MotherPlucker" was a non-starter. We have a six-string version (7 and 8-string versions will follow) and we have a djent version that targets only the bottom two strings.

We developed a version that fretted itself as well, but ran afoul of some forward-thinking piano roll trademarks that are still in effect. Gibson was willing to pay for licensing, but we pointed out to them that a guitar that played itself really had no need of a guitarist, and that we would have to develop technology that would simply pull money out of the pockets of passers by. Then we realized that Apple was already implementing that and threw up our hands in despair.
#35
Quote by WeZ-84
A few people suggest it would be a nice to have feature in a tuner pedal.
So why not extend what you have done already to add a tuner to it.?
That way you would be more likely to be able to sell it as a standalone unit.

I can also see it having an application at a string manufacturer.
But, rather than using the TS value a marketing gimmick, it could be used
to make sure that each batch of strings they produce is consistent.

For example if the manufacturer made sure the TS value they measured for every
batch of strings they made was the same as (or was very close to) the TS value from the previous batches, they could ensure that any changes they made to their manufacturing processes / the materials they used did not effect the sound of the final product.

That way, every time someone buys a new pack of a particular brand of strings,
they would always sounds the same from one packet to the next.

So it may still be worth at least trying to contact string manufacturers to see if whether this is something they already do at their factories and if not they might be interested in it.

Although I suspect it is likely that string manufacturers already have processes in place that monitor quality and consistency of their products, but I could be wrong!


The pedal also works as a tuner !

But still, thank you for that suggestion!

Also, the quality testing for stringsproducers was also one of my earliest thoughts, great that others think the same
#36
Quote by dspellman
I should probably reveal that I'm working on something like this for a new edition of the MinETune (GForce/GString) for Gibson and that there are existing patents and trademarks registered.

It will be part of the MinETune and will detect changes in the electrical nature of the string itself over time and compare them to the stored information on the same string as new. Several data sets will be available, depending on the string sets you're using, along with some custom user data sets for those using custom string gauges, etc.

Three LEDs (green, yellow, red) will indicate "still new," "getting tatty," and "time to restring." Please refer to our handouts and press releases being distributed at the NAMM show just now underway in Anaheim, CA.

Further developments will include adding a small electric shock to the user if he's callously exceeding the red limit. We're not sure that this will actually be implemented (liability lawyers are still working this one over). We're also investigating a string "spool" setup that will store spools of a common string gauge inside the guitar itself (Gibson LPs are largely hollowed out these days, so we have space to work with). This will actually allow automatic restringing, with a version of the Planet Waves locking tuners' cutoff setup part of the motorized system. This will obviously be able to be disabled for gigs and for long term storage (wouldn't do to come back from a long vacation and find lengths of string lying about next to a guitar stand) and for guitars stored around cats. Again, the liability lawyers have asked us to ensure that small children and idiot users won't have their eyes poked out should they be close (say, investigating the whirring noises coming from the guitar) when the restringing actually happens. We're considering a motion detector, a proximity alarm and possibly a sonic detector (dogs). We've already incorporated an RFID reader to detect animals who've been "chipped," and we're encouraging having small children chipped in the same way. Some have proposed a breathalyzer to prevent string changes during owner inebriation episodes. Yet another proposal is a small storage compartment for vapor corrosion inhibition chemistry at each end of the string (this would require changing on a yearly basis) to help extend string life in a closed environment such as a guitar case.


I like the way you troll (see what I did there)

And "MotherPlucker" haha lol
#37
Quote by XgamerGt04
You know... I used to think the same thing about a lot of products that have been made and sell really well. For all we know this could take off and be a million dollar idea. The more I think about it I could see a phone type app being really useful at a large guitar store that tries to keep its stock in good condition or for traveling acts.

The thought about different composition of strings and helping someone find out if they would like another better is interesting though. I would assume it should work the same way since it is all based on doing an FFT likely.


Thank you very much! These kind of comments are really motivating for me, thank you !
#39
Keep working hard Marcus.
2005 Ibanez RG1570
1998 Ibanez RG7620
1998 Mesa 2 Ch. Dual Rec
#40
Marcus, sorry for the jokes. I know this a serious idea and there may be more to it than I am seeing. Keep it up.
On the other hand "Motherplucker" made me laugh more than I have in weeks. Thanks to dspellman, that was great.
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