#1
Hello, I am a beginner learning to play electric guitar (:
I ordered an electric guitar starter kit from a brand named Davisom, and it included a 10w amp. I was wondering if the amp would be enough to practice on in my bedroom?
Thanks to anyone that answers! (:
#2
What kind of 10w amp is it?

The power of an amp gives no indication of how good it is.
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#3
Well, I got the starter kit from ebay haha. It says that it's a Davison. Sounds kind of off brand, but I can find the same starter kit on amazon.
#4
10 watts is fine. the quality of the amp would be more the issue. cheap starter kit amps tend to be total garbage so that would be the issue not the wattage.
#5
I also cannot help but ask why you're asking this question in the first place. You've already bought this amp, and now you're stuck with it. Asking if its a good amp or not is completely pointless now. You should've asked before you bought it when anyone's advice would've been meaningful to you.

I've never heard of a 'Davidson' practice amp as its probably a no-name brand, and the amp itself is probably identical in every way to thousands of generic practice amps, the only difference being they all have different, generic brand names.
Roses are red
Violets are blue
Omae wa mou
Shindeiru



Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Jan 21, 2015,
#7
If it sounds good and you're happy with it, is it a bad amp for you? Not at all!
#8
It's almost certainly nothing special as an amp, but if you're a complete beginner, you'll be lucky if your amp tone is the limiting factor before a year is up. For learning the basics, any guitar that's set up OK and has a way to hear the sound will allow you to practice, and that's all that really matters. Plenty of time to obsess over tonewoods, pickup swaps and tube amps (like the rest of us! :-)) after you have the basics down. For now, open the box, tune it up and play.
#9
Yeah, I'd say have as much fun as possible with this rig.

If you are like most of us you already have your eye out for a nicer amp. Man there are a lot of real nice inexpensive, small, stay at home player, type amps available; some of which are real good amps and sound super good.

One of these super nice small amps will make your guitar sound a thousand times better and make playing a lot more fun.

If you can find one of those Vox Valvetronix modeling amps you might really like all the different sounds you can get out if it, and it has a tube in it to make it sound smoother. You can spot these older Vox modeling amps as soon as you scope out the store because they stand out with their unsightly "chrome" BBQ grill type speaker grill covers. They have earned the appropriate nick name, "Chromies".

I finally picked up a "Chromie" after thinking about it for a few years. I got a VT30 NOS (new old stock) for 135, cash; at a guitar store. I still see these "Chromies" around at stores. I wouldn't pay much but they are super nice small amps for playing around with. They have lots of amp models and effects, that may or may not sound anything like the items they are supposed to be emulating; but they are super fun and make your guitar sound cool. Really fun for just rocking out, even if you are just beginning.

I have been playing for a long, long time, and started playing more seriously after I retired twelve years ago. I also started collecting guitars and amps, starting out with pretty cheap, supposedly beginner stuff. I have most of my stuff even though I have upgraded my collection with some real decent stuff in the five years or so. I have a few real nice all tube amps, that I definitely dig a lot; but that "Chromie" is fun to play because of all the sounds that it combines into the final output sound. It has variations of any amp model you choose, adjustments to the amp models and effects, and you can combine a few sounds together with reverb and delay, etc., to come up with some interesting tones. It also has a bunch of pre-set models that sound pretty cool and all you have to do is push one button to change from one to another. Plus these Vox "Chromies" seem to be quite a step up from the similar Peavey Vypyrs, Line 6 junk, and other cheap small modeling amps.

Learn how to tune and restring your guitar. Get one of those tuners that clamp onto the headstock. They are very useful. Clamp it on and leave it there. Put some new strings on your guitar as soon as you can. Get a manual string winding tool. Buy good strings. I would say buy strings of the "nine" gauge. Just tell them you want a set of "nines". It refers to the diameter of the smallest string in the set, 0.009". These are standard size and probably the same size that are on your guitar. Changing sizes can cause the guitar to play differently and require adjustment.

If you start taking lessons, ask you teacher to adjust your guitar for you. Usually teachers will do it for free. Eventually you will have your guitar working real decently and you'll be looking at your next half way decent guitar - new or used. It is something that as you learn more about it you want to move up to other items that draw your developing interest.

Good luck. Play the amp, don't expect much out of it, and as you save up a little more money look for a "Chromie" or something else that catches your interest.

You do not need to get an amp that's over 25 watts.

Great deals on amps show up all the time. You might even be able to grab a working all tube amp, which I would seriously consider looking at if one comes up in your price range. Most any amp, even the bigger ones, can be turned down to sound good at bedroom level.

As far as amps go, I've found that sticking to the big names is the best way to go because they tend to be dependable and "repairable". I want repairable amps. The big companies are Fender, Marshall, Vox, etc.

The time will come, if you like messing with the guitar, that you will move up to some stuff that you like better and it can be found in any wattage, even ten watts.

The important thing is to dig it. Getting a nicer amp that does more sounds might help you dig it more. Usually a nice amp will make a beginner guitar sound "great". The amp is often the limiting factor. Getting a better amp will make a decent beginner guitar really sound very noticeably better.
"Now all the things that use to mean so much to me have got me old before my time." G. Allman, "Old Before My Time", Hittin' The Note cd.
#10
Thanks guys (: im gonna buy the peavy rage 258 25w amp and get a tube amp when im much better haha
#11
Just stay away from the Peavey rage. Since you're just starting a good amp for practicing at home is the Roland cube series. I had a cube back in the dorms and it was a great sounding amp and you could get a lot out of it. The cube should last you until you get a decent tube amp. Also worth checking out are the Peavey vyper amps.
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#12
Don't buy the Peavey Rage.

You can do much better with your money. Hold off and get something decent like the Roland Cube mentioned above. Not the Peavey Rage. I had one - relatively junk.
"Now all the things that use to mean so much to me have got me old before my time." G. Allman, "Old Before My Time", Hittin' The Note cd.
#13
Yes I just got the 10 watt fender front man amp 60 dollars from sweetwater.
The amp is nice and its loud its plenty for what u need it for 25 watts is over kill.
I cranked mine up a few times I shook the windows lol
#14
Quote by Tazz3
Yes I just got the 10 watt fender front man amp 60 dollars from sweetwater.
The amp is nice and its loud its plenty for what u need it for 25 watts is over kill.
I cranked mine up a few times I shook the windows lol


My half stack doesn't even rattle the windows. How dare you try to mislead us