#1
I just noticed the singing sub forum and took a look around. Listened to a few of the people looking for advice, and noticed a couple of things that seem to be present each time.

I started singing when I was about 6 or 7 with two uncles, who also taught me guitar. They taught me to sing harmonies at the same time, since they were usually singing lead, so harmonizing is pretty much natural. I'm pushing 60 now so I've been at it a long time and if you want my opinion I'm going to listen to you with the same critical ear I listen to me. Deal with it...

Here's what I notice so far.

Pitch control...

Don't start a note and come up or down to it, learn to hit the right note from the start every time. Pitch is critical, or you sound out of tune. If you have to, use a guitar or piano and play each note you can sing and sing along with it.

Here is a diagram of the ear. Scroll down to te images and click the first one on the left. http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/175622/human-ear

You'll see a flap at the middle of the ear called the Tragus. Push there and close your ear. You'll be able to hear yourself really well, and hear your pitch a lot better.

It takes a lot of practice, but if you can hear yourself you can develop good pitch control.

Phrasing...

Breathe only between the lines, not in the middle of them. That's a general rule, and in some cases you'll have plenty time in the middle of a line to grab a breath, but in general, try to only breather between vocal lines. Most of the time you want the vocals to be smooth and flowing, not choppy. (called staccato)

Power...

Singing is not the same as humming along with the radio in your car. When I sing I'm louder than my acoustic guitar. I've seen people at clubs who want to sit in and you can't hear them on my vocal mic at all, they sing just like the hum along with the radio. Read the sticky, it has some good info about using your diaphram. Learn it and get some power out of your voice.

Range...

Learn your vocal range and stay within it. I'm having a lot of trouble with that right now, some of the songs my band plays put me in a position I'm straining my range, I'm trying to work out of that and find some new songs that don't push my vocal range so bad.

Here's a sample, and it shows a couple of things I've already mentioned.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iKnqSKQCIs4

I did lead and harmony vocals in the verses, we all 3 did harmonies in the choruses, and we did those twice to get the choir effect. I made a couple of mistakes. Mainly, I didn't warm up enough. we ran through the song once with my acoustic and started recording. I should have spent 30 minutes warming up first. Then someone hit a sour note the first chorus when we all 3 came in, I think it was me, Shane thinks it was him. I was also straining my range for some of the high notes. This was the first time we had played together in 15 years, no practice, no warm up, one time through and go for it. I'm the bearded guy...

So those are some of the mistakes you want to avoid...and some of the things to work on.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#3
Thanks, glad you liked it. Sorry I didn't respond earlier, forgot to check now and then...I just hope it helps some people a little.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#4
I heard a tip to help hitting notes spot on and not bending up. So if anyone is reading...

Get your melody and practice it staccato. Short sharp notes. Doing this doesn't allow you time to bend the note up if you miss it. You are forced to hit the notes straight off the bat.

Record yourself then listen back. Find any bum notes and work on hitting them straight off.

If you can nail the melody staccato then you will be able to hit the notes straight off and then you can practice holding the notes for their duration.
Si
#5
Hmmm...that sounds good, might work. Recording and listening to yourself is definitely a good idea. I did that when I was 8...I sucked...got better in a hurry...
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...