#1
hello guys

whats a riff ? a lick ? a lead ?

and do guys solo using pentanotic scales or major scales ?
#2
To me a riff is a repeated melodic figure that is part of a song. A lick is a melodic phrase that is used in improvisation or to start/end a song like "a shave and a hair cut"
A lead is the solo.

Pentatonic scales are fragments of major/minor scales so I use both.
#3
+1 to Duane.

On scale use:

Both and neither at the same time.

Sounds like a pretentious Zen thing but its the truth.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#4
A riff is a repeated musical figure. It can be rhythmic, harmonic, melodic or a mixture of any of these.

A lick is a short melodic phrase that can be used like a building block in a melody.

A lead is a prominent, substantial melody played over a harmonic backing.

Guys solo using pentatonic scales. Girls use major scales.
Last edited by Jehannum at Jan 23, 2015,
#5
Quote by Jehannum
A riff is a repeated musical figure. It can be rhythmic, harmonic, melodic or a mixture of any of these.

A lick is a short melodic phrase that can be used like a building block in a melody.

A lead is a prominent, substantial melody played over a harmonic backing.

Guys solo using pentatonic scales. Girls use major scales.

Once I thought I saw a girl playing pentatonic but then I realised she was just choosing notes from the major scale
#8
Riff - First 5 seconds of Chuck Berry's "Johnny B Goode".

First First 5 seconds or so of "Train Train", by Blackfoot

First few seconds of Tom Petty's "I Need to Know", "Runnin Down A Dream", Mary Jane's Last Dance".

The first few seconds of "Layla".

Lick - Hard to come up with specific examples, quite often you'll hear a few specific notes usually at the beginning of a lead that are very memorable. The entire lead section of Eric Clapton's "Wonderful Tonight" is a lead comprised of individual licks...if that makes any sense...but it sounds totally wrong if you play it any other way. The Steely Dan song "Reelin in the Years" is another good example, the first guitar lead is some great specific "licks" that comprise a lead.

Lead - The entire lead guitar part, the short leads between vocal lines are usually called fills. For example Duanne Allman did a lot of slide fills in the verses of "Statesboro Blues", then a full lead, a break with a few stops, then Dicky Betts did a regular lead, then Duanne did slide fills the rest of the song. Ditto for "Melissa", but no slide guitar.

I think Duane and Jehannum came up with the best definitions...
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...