#2
Yeah probably. There's pretty much a set standard for things like that. I replaced my Seagull's Tusq pins with bone pins (no idea where from) and had no problems with them.
#5
Quote by DudE132
Another question,

Would this Martin saddle fit in my Seagull as well? ....[ ]...


There are two width of saddle in common use. The "Martin style", which are 3/32" of an inch thick, and the "Taylor style", which is 1/8" thick, usually compensated, while the Martin style isn't. That was a fancy way of saying, "I don't know, better measure it". Grab a friend who knows how to use a micrometer, at least if you don't.

You need to measure the thickness of your saddle, along with the length. The length measurement, along with the height, are just a guide for knowing generally, how much sanding you're going to have to do. OTOH, a saddle which is too short, (on the longest axis), would be fairly unsightly, (but still functional).

Acoustic bridge pins are standard, with the exception of Ibanez and Crafter. Those two brands have straight shank pins. Ibanez calls them, "Advantage Pins", because they can charge 6 bucks a pop for a 50 cent plastic pin.

AFAIK, you can put tapered pins into an Ibby, (or Crafter), bridge, but you can't put straight shank pins into the more standard tapered holes.

If you're not desperate to buy these things tonight, Patticake might be able to say with absolute certainty on the pin issue. (Which is certainly not to say Tony hasn't".

Correctly measuring the saddle on your guitar, will give you the answer to the saddle issue.
#6
Quote by Captaincranky
(Which is certainly not to say Tony hasn't".




That reminds me of a saying attributed to General Blucher (who thought he had been impregnated by an elephant at the time) at the battle of Waterloo:

"You people think I know **** nothing, in fact I know **** all".

HTH.
#7
Quote by Tony Done
That reminds me of a saying attributed to General Blucher (who thought he had been impregnated by an elephant at the time) at the battle of Waterloo:

"You people think I know **** nothing, in fact I know **** all".

HTH.
This makes me think I should have only butted in about the saddle and left it at that.....
#8
Does bridge pin material actually make a difference in tone? I can't imagine why it would. I can see the saddle and nut making a difference since the strings actually rest and vibrate on those parts.
#9
Quote by rohash
Does bridge pin material actually make a difference in tone? I can't imagine why it would. I can see the saddle and nut making a difference since the strings actually rest and vibrate on those parts.



Honestly I noticed no difference between different pin materials when I changed mine. Any difference in tone would be so small that it could easily be un-done by minute changes in picks, strings, pickups, etc. Or even just how you play the strings (hard, soft, pick, fingers, etc.)
The same can almost be said for the saddle and nut, although I think they do make more of a difference. The problem is getting a side-by-side comparison - by the time you've lifted the strings and swapped the old parts for the new parts, you've probably forgotten how the old ones sounded and would struggle to notice any difference. A recording would obviously be the best way around this but the picks, strings and techniques you use still make more of a difference.
#10
^^^^ I agree for the most part, except that the added mass of brass pins can affect the tone. - I have three brass pins in the treble side of my kona to mellow the very "up-front" tone a bit.

OTOH, different saddle materials can make a substantial difference. I mostly use bone, but I recently made an aluminium alloy one that I like a lot.