#1
Would you recommend me start to learn rock first rather then metal, or does it not matter?
My guitar of choice would either be an Epi les paul 100 for rock or a Schecter S-1 plus for metal.
Also would the schecter sound good for playing rock too or is it only a metal type guitar?
#2
It matters but it doesn't matter. Usually the blues/rock stuff is easier to learn at first to get the fundamentals of playing down. Then to get more advanced techniques you move to metal, but you can really just learn what you want.

As far as the guitar, just get the Schecter. It may be a metal oriented brand but there are no "metal guitars". Most guitars nowadays are pretty versatile, the S-1 included. You'll just get more bang for your buck at that price point with the Schecter.
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#3
If you're just beginning, the most important thing is to learn guitar.

Once you've done that, you'll be able to play both rock and metal.
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#4
Learn whatever you can. Also depending on what songs you want to play rock and metal are just as difficult as each other. Start off with your basic chords and melodies and get comfortable with the feel of the guitar. The hardest part of learning guitar is the beginning when you're getting coordinated with it all.
But yeah, don't practice Metallica or Megadeth songs when you first start, you'll get frustrated and give up.
#5
As mentioned it doesn't matter, but learn your basics like chords, scales, technique, and music theory. I've seen people ignore their basics and anytime they want to play anything other than "shred" they're completely lost. I'll pm you some good exercises to start you off later when I get back home.
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#6
Forget all that shit about scales and everything. JUST PLAY THE DAMN SONG. I have made countless solos without scales and they just sound way better than running up and down a scale for every solo. Just jump right into metal. It's gonna kick your ass but you're going to feel a lot better playing what you want, if metal is what you want
#7
Quote by nathan:-)

But yeah, don't practice Metallica or Megadeth songs when you first start, you'll get frustrated and give up.


Metallica is child's play. Megadeth's stuff is insane pre-Countdown. The ratio of Metallica songs I've been able to learn to Megadeth stuff is about 4:1. That's quite a difference
#8
Quote by GaryBillington
If you're just beginning, the most important thing is to learn guitar.

Once you've done that, you'll be able to play both rock and metal.


this. a guitar is a guitar the Schecter isn't automatically a "metal" guitar nor the epi a "rock" guitar. you play guitar the style is up to you. while some guitars are better suited for certain styles that really doesn't exclude them from being used for others. I play blues with a BC Rich which is usually associated with metal. just learn to play.
#9
Quote by PiercedBand
Forget all that shit about scales and everything. JUST PLAY THE DAMN SONG. I have made countless solos without scales and they just sound way better than running up and down a scale for every solo. Just jump right into metal. It's gonna kick your ass but you're going to feel a lot better playing what you want, if metal is what you want


poor advice. learning scales etc gives you the building blocks for solos. just puking random notes works sometimes but not most of the time. if you are just running up and down a scale that isn't really soloing just poor playing.
#10
What do you think Kirk Hammett does? He just runs up and down, raping the pentatonic. Nobody wants to be that guy. In thrash I am allowed to make whatever kind of solo I please, so you can just "randomly plucky some notes" even though that's not what I do. Scales are only good depending on what you're playing in my opinion
#11
Quote by PiercedBand
What do you think Kirk Hammett does? He just runs up and down, raping the pentatonic. Nobody wants to be that guy. In thrash I am allowed to make whatever kind of solo I please, so you can just "randomly plucky some notes" even though that's not what I do. Scales are only good depending on what you're playing in my opinion


So yeah, **** those scales. Unless you wanna learn something other than thrash.

Good advice.
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#12
A guitar is a guitar.

There are basics that you'll want to know if you want to progress on it OR you can simply learn a song by rote, in a "put your finger here first, then there" and never have any idea why you're doing what you're doing or how to progress on your own beyond what you're playing at that point.
#13
Thanks guys. I started practicing chords yesterday and it actually felt good to know that my fingers were hurting. Can't wait to see where I am a few months from now (:
#14
Quote by PiercedBand
Forget all that shit about scales and everything. JUST PLAY THE DAMN SONG. I have made countless solos without scales and they just sound way better than running up and down a scale for every solo. Just jump right into metal. It's gonna kick your ass but you're going to feel a lot better playing what you want, if metal is what you want

And I would equally bet that every solo you've ever written comes from maybe 3 or 4 different scales. Just because you're not aware of what you're doing doesn't mean you're not doing it. There is no time when being aware of what you're doing is going to somehow be worse than if you're just playing notes you think sound fine. Essentially that's what it always should come down to but scales give you the perfect framework to use when you're writing. "Running up and down a scale for every solo" isn't a product of a scale, it's a product of someone thinking that a scale is anything more than a set of notes to use. That's all a scale is, it's a set of notes that will sound a certain way over a certain set of chord; thinking that a scale inherently involves running up and down without producing any real music is a very flawed mentality.

Quote by PiercedBand
Metallica is child's play. Megadeth's stuff is insane pre-Countdown. The ratio of Metallica songs I've been able to learn to Megadeth stuff is about 4:1. That's quite a difference

Please don't be so arrogant as to call Metallica "child's play". It's horrendously misleading and disheartening for beginners. Even the simplest of Metallica songs is well beyond the abilities of beginners, whether you remember it or not there's no way you would have been able to start with any of their songs and actually get anywhere meaningful.

Quote by PiercedBand
What do you think Kirk Hammett does? He just runs up and down, raping the pentatonic. Nobody wants to be that guy. In thrash I am allowed to make whatever kind of solo I please, so you can just "randomly plucky some notes" even though that's not what I do. Scales are only good depending on what you're playing in my opinion

Frankly your opinion is wrong. With the exception of Marty Friedman (whose soloing approach could be the subject of a whole dissertation) I would bet real money that all your favourite lead guitarists are at least reasonably fluent in theory, if not very well versed in it.

I'm not saying that your approach doesn't work for you, I'm sure it's fine when it comes to your playing... but please don't tell other people explicitly not to learn things. This kind of thinking is harmful to more players than it helps and frankly makes all us guitarists look like musical morons to anyone who plays any other instrument even vaguely well.
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#15
Quote by PierceHerVeil
Thanks guys. I started practicing chords yesterday and it actually felt good to know that my fingers were hurting. Can't wait to see where I am a few months from now (:


Keep at it,,use rubbing alcohol on your fretting finger tips 2 times a day.
This will help u build up Calis faster
I been playing for over 2 months it gets a little easy go to Justin guitar for lessons and easy songs.
#16
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
And I would equally bet that every solo you've ever written comes from maybe 3 or 4 different scales. Just because you're not aware of what you're doing doesn't mean you're not doing it. There is no time when being aware of what you're doing is going to somehow be worse than if you're just playing notes you think sound fine. Essentially that's what it always should come down to but scales give you the perfect framework to use when you're writing. "Running up and down a scale for every solo" isn't a product of a scale, it's a product of someone thinking that a scale is anything more than a set of notes to use. That's all a scale is, it's a set of notes that will sound a certain way over a certain set of chord; thinking that a scale inherently involves running up and down without producing any real music is a very flawed mentality.


Please don't be so arrogant as to call Metallica "child's play". It's horrendously misleading and disheartening for beginners. Even the simplest of Metallica songs is well beyond the abilities of beginners, whether you remember it or not there's no way you would have been able to start with any of their songs and actually get anywhere meaningful.


Frankly your opinion is wrong. With the exception of Marty Friedman (whose soloing approach could be the subject of a whole dissertation) I would bet real money that all your favourite lead guitarists are at least reasonably fluent in theory, if not very well versed in it.

I'm not saying that your approach doesn't work for you, I'm sure it's fine when it comes to your playing... but please don't tell other people explicitly not to learn things. This kind of thinking is harmful to more players than it helps and frankly makes all us guitarists look like musical morons to anyone who plays any other instrument even vaguely well.


So. Much. Truth.

All of this, beginners. Don't listen to the people who tell you not to learn your theory. They are plain wrong. Even if they get by without for what they do (and plenty of people do), it can't hurt, and is guaranteed to help.
#17
Man, I don't think I've ever seen that PiercedBand guy post anything that wasn't completely awful. If I had to guess... dude seems like the kind of guy that would think that playing the right notes in the right order is all it takes to play a song (ignoring things like proper muting, clean playing with both hands, etc).

And while opinions on whether or not it is a good thing to aspire to play like Kirk, it's just plain silly to say that nobody wants to be Kirk.

Learning theory is always helpful as long as you remember that it is theory to help analyze and interpret rather than some sort of steadfast rules on how to compose. I can't tell you how many people I have known that "learn theory" and then try and criticize things for not using strict diatonic chords and notes. It seems silly but I have heard people say that you can't use an A or F chord when writing a song in the key of G.

As far as TS's original question... when starting out you (as Gary put it) learn to play guitar. Learn the basics such as how to play basic chords, how to pick and fret cleanly, how to get your fingers moving independently, etc.

From a technical point almost all guitar playing is based on the same fundamentals with the actual notes and chords you play and the order that you play them being what makes different sounds. Once you learn the basics you can worry about the stylistic differences and quirks of each genre. And from a technical point there is significant overlap in thone quirks when it comes to playing rock and metal.
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#18
Quote by GaryBillington
If you're just beginning, the most important thing is to learn guitar.

Once you've done that, you'll be able to play both rock and metal.

This.

There's a lot of very basic stuff you need to get a grasp of before you start worrying about the finer details. Simply holding the guitar is going to feel awkward as hell at first, and the seemingly simple act of holding down a single chord for the first time will seem ridiculously difficult.

In short, don't get too far ahead of yourself and prepare yourself for a bit of a slog at first. It may feel like you're not getting anywhere for the first few weeks but that's normal, once you get a bit more accustomed to the guitar and your hands get used to it things start to get easier.

And ignore PiercedBand who seems to have completely forgotten just how difficult and daunting the guitar is the very first time you pick one up. Likewise I've made many mistakes in my time and taken lots of shortcuts that may have worked for me, but I'd never go so far as to recommend them to a beginner. I learned 30 years ago, there's a lot more resources available these days and there's no reason to not learn things.

Just take your time and be patient, it's not a race - things will take as long as they take.
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#20
Quote by KailM
People who say things like "Metallica songs are like child's play" usually can't really play Metallica's songs. Just sayin'.....


...but they usually think that they can play them just fine.
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#22
Good old Dunning-Kruger at its finest.
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#23
I would contend that it's pretty hard to actually lambast someone for a metacognitive bias. Overcoming these things is somewhere between difficult and harder-than-climbing-Everest-hard.

Little leeway here guys, come on.
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#24
Quote by theogonia777
...but they usually think that they can play them just fine.


Yup. Like those people who play that one riff from master of puppets without the 0-1 on the low E between the high notes, just doing a 0-0 between the notes on the A string.

I'm sure somebody will know what riff I'm talking about based on that description.
#25
You mean like the

-------2-------3-------4--
-0-1-----0-1----0-1------

sort of riff after the first riff?
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#26
Nothing is wrong by getting into metal when they start playing.

I personally did when I went for my electric guitar. Metal or should I say thrash inspired me to get going.

I got my first electric a black Applause Stratocaster knock off and 2 tab books by Metallica. That was black album and kill'em'all. No amp yet.

The only thing was that I did not really get into the basics whatever that was supposed to mean.

However I just kept playing and learned what ever I wanted to learn. Pretty soon I had no problem as far as my playing went even in a basic rock cover band.
#27
Quote by theogonia777
You mean like the

-------2-------3-------4--
-0-1-----0-1----0-1------

sort of riff after the first riff?


Exactly.
#28
Quote by the_bi99man
Exactly.


I usually play it T for the 0s, I for the 1s, and M for the A string note, but that's just me.
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