#1
I've been searching everywhere for an answer to this question, but nothing has been able to help. I bought a tab book, and above the music staff it shows the chord names of what is tabbed below. In several spots of the book there is an * with a note at the bottom of the page that says "chord symbols reflect implied harmony." The 1st few times I saw this, I noticed that there were single note riffs or an arpeggio beneath. I assumed then that the chord symbol above was indicating that the single notes related to the named chord. The confusing part came when I saw the * and note, the "implied harmony" was an A5 chord, but what was tabbed below was an F5 chord for guitar 1 and an F octave for guitar 2. How is A5 being "implied" when the majority of the notes being played are F's?
Please help me understand this?
#5
Thanks for the replies. Turns out each of you were kind of right. The guitars in the particular song are tuned 2 whole steps down. The chord symbols on the top would be right if the guitars were tuned in standard tuning. I guess they didn't take the guitar tuning into account when adding the chord symbols when publishing the book.
#6
^ Yeah. Many times the chord symbols are the same for every tuning. When I'm in a standard like dropped tuning (for example C standard), I still call my 0 2 2 1 0 0 chord E major.

When you tune down, the guitar kind of becomes a "transposing instrument". You can keep using the same fingerings and you don't need to change your thinking.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#7
Knowing now that the chord symbols are just calling the chords what they would be if the guitars were in standard tuning, I'm now confused about the key signature. I assume the key signature shown in the tab is based on the chords that were named, not the chords that were played. Does that mean that I just drop the key signature down 2 whole steps to match the actual chords?
#8
What key is the song in? Figure that out by ear.

If the chord symbols are written as if the guitar was in standard tuning, I think the same applies to key signatures. That means the guitar is treated as a transposing instrument. So if the notation says A, the actual sound is F. The sound is always a third lower than written (if you are tuned to C standard).

So if the sound of the key is Ab major (4 flats), it will be written as C major (all naturals).
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115