#1
Hey guys, what's up? I've been playing the guitar for almost 1 year and a half (self-taught) and I've been really wanting to start composing my own stuff. I know it's early but I'm eager to learn along with the experience!
I have tried a bunch of times but the songs end up sounding... too simple! Mainstream chords and all. I have seen people play chords I never heard of and I just wonder, how do they come up with those chords? They're probably existing chords but how do they get there... Perhaps someone could shed some light on this (dark) matter? Thanks in advance.
#2
The answer I would give to this is long for a forum, but it's really kind of simple. I will probably make a video that you would find useful. At the end of the day, it's always your mind and creativity that decides what to play, but there is a good deal of useful for knowledge out there for understanding music, and if it is explained right, it is simple. It can also be explained in such a way that makes it seem like the most complicated thing in the universe.
#3
Quote by fingrpikingood
The answer I would give to this is long for a forum, but it's really kind of simple. I will probably make a video that you would find useful. At the end of the day, it's always your mind and creativity that decides what to play, but there is a good deal of useful for knowledge out there for understanding music, and if it is explained right, it is simple. It can also be explained in such a way that makes it seem like the most complicated thing in the universe.


If you end up doing that video you mentioned, please post it. Shine on!
#4
You might want to start off with a guitar theory book for beginners or just google guitar theory and see what comes up. Chords usually (I want to say always) follow a specific formula like how major chords follow the pattern 1 3 5. For example C major can be created by looking at its scale C D E F G A B with C being 1, D 2etc. So C Major would be C E G. Once you have the notes for the chord you will have to find out the fingering in which you hit all the notes.

To discover more chords find a formula you don't know like major 7 (1 3 5 7) and create the chords from it. Alternatively you could just look up the chords instead of figuring out the fingerings yourself but in my opinion it is more beneficial and fun to work through them. Hopefully I was able to help somewhat and at least put you on the right path.
And everything that once was
infinitely far
and unsayable is now
unsayable
and right here in the room.


- Franz Wright
Last edited by NougatOfficial at Jan 24, 2015,
#5
Quote by NougatOfficial
You might want to start off with a guitar theory book for beginners or just google guitar theory and see what comes up. Chords usually (I want to say always) follow a specific formula like how major chords follow the pattern 1 3 5. For example C major can be created by looking at its scale C D E F G A B with C being 1, D 2etc. So C Major would be C E G. Once you have the notes for the chord you will have to find out the fingering in which you hit all the notes.

To discover more chords find a formula you don't know like major 7 (1 3 5 7) and create the chords from it. Alternatively you cold just look up the chords instead of figuring out the fingerings yourself but in my opinion it is more beneficial and fun to work through them. Hopefully I was able to help somewhat and at least put you on the right path.


Thanks for the brief, yet great, explanation.
Would you know about any good books on music theory that are actually good?
#6
The book that I got started with was "The Practical Guide to Modern Music Theory for Guitarists" by Joseph Alexander. I don't know if its the best book out there and you can probably find the same information free on the internet but it is easier than having to scour the internet and he does a good job of explaining things. Plus you can just buy the ebook which is a lot cheaper than buying the physical book.

I'd also recommend you check amazon because you can read previews of the books to see if you like how the author presents the information and also read reviews on the them.
And everything that once was
infinitely far
and unsayable is now
unsayable
and right here in the room.


- Franz Wright
#7
Quote by NougatOfficial
The book that I got started with was "The Practical Guide to Modern Music Theory for Guitarists" by Joseph Alexander. I don't know if its the best book out there and you can probably find the same information free on the internet but it is easier than having to scour the internet and he does a good job of explaining things. Plus you can just buy the ebook which is a lot cheaper than buying the physical book.

I'd also recommend you check amazon because you can read previews of the books to see if you like how the author presents the information and also read reviews on the them.


I'm gonna give it a look, thanks for all the help mate!
#8
As John Lennon once said. 'I have no knowledge of music theory whatsoever. I just go from chord 1 to chord 2 and if I like the result I keep it. If I don't I try a different combination.

Another advocate of this approach is Elliot Smith who was another songwriting legend.

Try moving your fingers 1 fret up or down (1 finger at a time) while holding down a chord. That should give you some new combinations to play around with. Also, you can try playing some open strings while holding down bar chords by just lifting up a knuckle of the index finger. Try lifting the finger on the high E while playing Bm and you will get my drift.

When it comes to songs, the most important thing is the rythm and a good combination of basic chords. These two things will yield you the melody of the song if they are both good. Sometimes you can even stay on the same chord but throw in a quick extra note here and there (e.g. Em-Esus2-Esus4-Em) and that will give you a melody.