#1
I received a deluxe telecaster in the mail and am having some fret buzz problems. Is it possible to completely remove all the fret buzzing, or will there always be a little?

I raised the action by raising the saddles. It seems to me they are way to high now. The action at the 12th fret is slightly more than 3/64" on the big E-string, and slightly less than 3/64" on the little E-string (normal?). The relief seemed correct to me the way it came. the neck isn't 100% straight but slightly curved the way my previous guitars have been. The micro tilt neck angle adjustment came not "engaged" the way it's supposed to.

But there is still buzzing, from the 4th fret to the 15th fret, primarily on the bigger strings. It doesn't buzz when played very softly.

Here are 3 images I uploaded that might help you see. Sorry they aren't great quality. http://learn-hindi-online.com/temp/temp.html
#2
Quote by condoravenue
Is it possible to completely remove all the fret buzzing, or will there always be a little?


It’s possible if you get your guitar PLEK’d and have the frets dressed on a regular basis. Or just bump the action up a little. But it’s a lot easier to do your low-volume practice with headphones on and just pretend there’s no buzz.
#3
you need to take it to a good guitar tech , could be a high fret , truss adjustment , you should be able to keep your low action and not have buzz
#4
Quote by jpnyc
It’s possible if you get your guitar PLEK’d and have the frets dressed on a regular basis. Or just bump the action up a little. But it’s a lot easier to do your low-volume practice with headphones on and just pretend there’s no buzz.


I doubt a brand new MIA guitar is that far out of whack that it needs a PLEK.


TS, it's hard to say without having very specific angles of pictures. I agree with the post above, though. There are lots of little things that contribute to a setup. If you're having issues and you're not sure where to go from there, taking it to a tech is a good idea.

Ask them to show you a thing or two about maintenance, too. Just about anyone worth their snuff shouldn't mind throwing out a few tips to you.
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#5
Fret buzz is fine as long as it isn't killing sustain or heard through the amp.

My rule of thumb is adjust the truss rod so you have 3/64" over the 7th fret across the board and after that adjust the saddles so you have 4/64" over the 17th fret for the wound strings and 3/64" for the unwound strings. You may be able to get a little lower with the D and A.
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#6
OK first...the truss rod is for adjusting neck relief only. The strings vibrate in a pattern similar to a jump rope. Wider in the middle, almost nothing at the bridge and nut. That means the neck needs to bow slightly away from the strings in the middle to give them room to vibrate.

To check that -

Put a capo on the 1st fret. Fret at the 12th. Using automotive feeler gauges or the right thickness guitar pick, you generally want .012" to .015" at the 7th or 8th fret. A .50mm guitar pick should be about .013". If your neck relief is in that range, you don't need to touch the truss rod. If it's less than .010", an adjustment might be a good idea.

The string height you posted is lower than what I use, I think most of my guitars are slightly higher. 4/64 is my usual starting point. I think if I remember correctly I've been keeping my guitars higher than that the past 20 years or so for playing slide, so your action is not all that high.

If you're getting fret buzz, you need to figure out exactly what causes it, rather than trying to "shotgun" it and throw all sorts of adjustments into the mix. I would agree with Rooster, take it to a shop and have them do a good setup, you should be able to remove all buzz unless something is loose and rattling, which can sound a little like a fret buzz at times.

With a new guitar, you could have a high fret, too little neck relief, (that's what it sounds like) a loose fret, action too low for your playing style...

Action "too high" or too low, is a subjective thing, the action is right when it plays good to your fingers. That may be too high or too low for me, I like my action fairly high, but if you like it, it's not too high or too low. And that's the only criteria for that...
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...