#1
Hello fella

I got a used guitar but it's a custom made so it's has no name to search on the internet.
But I wondering if it was a good guitar or what.
So I would make a list of Question and hope someone kindly answer it. (You don't need to answer all if you tired )

1. How do I know the quality and the type of wood used in my guitar? The fretboard is dark and the back is white.

2. It's a used guitar but the neck part was just as a new wood that cut down yesterday and only the metal part are rusted.

3. .....Well, How do I know if it good or bad :/
#2
Umm... post pictures? It's hard to tell wood type just looking at it though, especially if it has a solid color finish, that's information the seller should know if it's "custom".
Gibson RD Silverburst w/ Lace Dissonant Aggressors (SOLD)
Electra Omega Prime Ceruse
Fender Franken-Jag Bass

Amps and the like:
Laney VH100R
Seismic Luke 2x12
Dunlop 105Q Wah
Gojira FX 808
Line 6 M9
#3
Quote by TheStig1214
Umm... post pictures? It's hard to tell wood type just looking at it though, especially if it has a solid color finish, that's information the seller should know if it's "custom".


Here's some photo I've taken with my phone.











#4
It looks like a cheap strat copy. A pretty good strat copy as far as aesthetics are concerned, but still a cheap strat copy.

What's the name on the headstock there? And can we see more shots of the body?

I can already tell the tuners are cheap, the frets are pretty small and cheap fretwire. Also I don't know what you mean when you say the neck wood is new but the metal parts are rusted. It would make no sense to put old hardware on a new neck.
Gibson RD Silverburst w/ Lace Dissonant Aggressors (SOLD)
Electra Omega Prime Ceruse
Fender Franken-Jag Bass

Amps and the like:
Laney VH100R
Seismic Luke 2x12
Dunlop 105Q Wah
Gojira FX 808
Line 6 M9
#5
Quote by TheStig1214
It looks like a cheap strat copy. A pretty good strat copy as far as aesthetics are concerned, but still a cheap strat copy.

What's the name on the headstock there? And can we see more shots of the body?

I can already tell the tuners are cheap, the frets are pretty small and cheap fretwire. Also I don't know what you mean when you say the neck wood is new but the metal parts are rusted. It would make no sense to put old hardware on a new neck.


If I know that it's bad guitar then I should pick the other one called Aria Pro II from japan .... It's japanese recycle product, what to expect
#6
Quote by sosxradar
If I know that it's bad guitar then I should pick the other one called Aria Pro II from japan .... It's japanese recycle product, what to expect



buy something from a big guitar company like fender, ibanez, gibson, etc. basically anything from a small company that make cheap guitars will be crap.


spend at least 300 US if you want something that isn't completely terrible, i you're just starting you can spend a bit less though.
#7
The action is ridiculously high. Probably needs the neck shimming to fix. This is possible to do yourself which is good as it would cost more for a tech to do it than the guitar is worth.

Aria Pro II is a respected cheap/mid price guitar, not a copy of anything. I don't no what you mean by recycle product. They are not copies of anything.
#8
Quote by PSimonR
The action is ridiculously high. Probably needs the neck shimming to fix. This is possible to do yourself which is good as it would cost more for a tech to do it than the guitar is worth.

How much does it cost if I let someone else fix it? 100$ or more? I know the action is high but I'm afraid to touch the guitar so I left it like that.

Aria Pro II is a respected cheap/mid price guitar, not a copy of anything. I don't no what you mean by recycle product. They are not copies of anything.


By recycle mean a recycle shop which they sold only a used quality product from Japan. They have drum, Ps3, 3000$ Yamaha which cost only 500$ in that shop and other stuff that Japanese people stop using.
#9
Quote by rickyj
buy something from a big guitar company like fender, ibanez, gibson, etc. basically anything from a small company that make cheap guitars will be crap.


spend at least 300 US if you want something that isn't completely terrible, i you're just starting you can spend a bit less though.


I will get Gibson Les Paul once I graduated but not now. So the question still remain.
#10
If your budget is low and you want a Les Paul sound the Ibanez FR or Artist series is good. The Schecter Solo 6.
Gibson RD Silverburst w/ Lace Dissonant Aggressors (SOLD)
Electra Omega Prime Ceruse
Fender Franken-Jag Bass

Amps and the like:
Laney VH100R
Seismic Luke 2x12
Dunlop 105Q Wah
Gojira FX 808
Line 6 M9
#12
Quote by TheStig1214
It looks like a cheap strat copy. A pretty good strat copy as far as aesthetics are concerned, but still a cheap strat copy.

What's the name on the headstock there? And can we see more shots of the body?

I can already tell the tuners are cheap, the frets are pretty small and cheap fretwire. Also I don't know what you mean when you say the neck wood is new but the metal parts are rusted. It would make no sense to put old hardware on a new neck.



Stig, what I think he means by "new wood" with the neck is that the wood looks clean and clear - like a maple neck, not painted. I don't think the guy knows all of our guitar nomenclature yet, he is just trying to communicate by trying to be as descriptive as he can be, from his perspective. Obviously he is a little confused and turning to us for direction. Your observations about the cheap tuners, small frets, etc., are the type of stuff that he needs to know. I think those comments helped him.

He needs some direction in order to pick out a decent inexpensive guitar.

I would advise him to get nothing less than an Epiphone Les Paul Studio if he wants to get a Les Paul. I don't know if he can get an Agile where he is at but maybe checking out rondomusic.com would give him a chance to get an Agile AL2xxx or AL3xxx. They are good quality, highly inexpensive guitars.

Hang in there dude. Keep looking until you find exactly what you want - you will know it when you find it. Don't listen to much to the salesmen that may be pushing certain make guitars or have other personal interests.

The guitar you have may or may not be okay for use at your level. You can probably do better. Live and learn.
"Now all the things that use to mean so much to me have got me old before my time." G. Allman, "Old Before My Time", Hittin' The Note cd.
Last edited by DuffB at Jan 25, 2015,
#13
Quote by DuffB
Stig, what I think he means by "new wood" with the neck is that the wood looks clean and clear - like a maple neck, not painted. I don't think the guy knows all of our guitar nomenclature yet, he is just trying to communicate by trying to be as descriptive as he can be, from his perspective. Obviously he is a little confused and turning to us for direction. Your observations about the cheap tuners, small frets, etc., are the type of stuff that he needs to know. I think those comments helped him.

He needs some direction in order to pick out a decent inexpensive guitar.

I would advise him to get nothing less than an Epiphone Les Paul Studio if he wants to get a Les Paul. I don't know if he can get an Agile where he is at but maybe checking out rondomusic.com would give him a chance to get an Agile AL2xxx or AL3xxx. They are good quality, highly inexpensive guitars.

Hang in there dude. Keep looking until you find exactly what you want - you will know it when you find it. Don't listen to much to the salesmen that may be pushing certain make guitars or have other personal interests.

The guitar you have may or may not be okay for use at your level. You can probably do better. Live and learn.


Look like this is not a good guitar but It's ok since I'm just a beginner. Anyway, Is it true that some used Gibson les paul price only 250- 500$? I go to guitar shop and he give me a close look at gibson but 250$ used gibson. His shop sell only a used guitar and he got fender mexico, fender japan, fender strat... I mean every used Guitar from other country but the price not even close 1000$. Is it possible that brand Guitar sell for low price?
#14
Quote by sosxradar
Look like this is not a good guitar but It's ok since I'm just a beginner. Anyway, Is it true that some used Gibson les paul price only 250- 500$? I go to guitar shop and he give me a close look at gibson but 250$ used gibson. His shop sell only a used guitar and he got fender mexico, fender japan, fender strat... I mean every used Guitar from other country but the price not even close 1000$. Is it possible that brand Guitar sell for low price?


Some recent Gibsons sold new under $1000, but you'd be hard pressed to find any of those used under $500 I'd say. They aren't fantastic guitars anyway.
Gibson RD Silverburst w/ Lace Dissonant Aggressors (SOLD)
Electra Omega Prime Ceruse
Fender Franken-Jag Bass

Amps and the like:
Laney VH100R
Seismic Luke 2x12
Dunlop 105Q Wah
Gojira FX 808
Line 6 M9
#15
Checkout the Agile AL's at rondomusic if you want a Les Paul. Agile makes some damn fine players at very good prices.
Fender Mustang/Derfenstein DST> Boss Power Wah> Pedal Monsters Klone> Bogner Uberschall> Walrus Audio Janus> Randall RM20> Line 6 M9> Randall RM20
#16
dude, some of these posts are ridiculous. First of all, if the guitar feels and sounds okay to you it's good. It's at least good enough. Second for $250 USD you aren't getting a Gibson. You are going to get a cheap ass knockoff worth about $80. Are you trying to sell this guitar you posted? Yes....it ain't worth shit. No? Play it unless the frets cut your hand.

You don't need to look into other makes and models, or spend more money. Play it, or if it is so shit you cannot play it, burn it.

The only the other posts got on point were that yes, it's a strat knockoff. That is not a 'custom' guitar unless the maker wanted to make a $400-500 custom guitar.
#17
For $250 USD you will never be able to buy a Gibson LP. Used Epiphones definitely. A used LP Standard will definitely be over a grand.
Regarding your current guitar, if you're a beginner just play it and see how you go. Don't get too deep into what gear you should get early on as it's a sure fire way to waste a lot of money. The action does look very high but have a look at some YouTube videos on 'how to set the action on a guitar' and see if you can improve it yourself. It'll probably be fine after a half decent setup.
#18
sosxradar. Just take the thing to a tech and have them set it up. I bet it's not near as bad as folks are saying it is, it probably just needs a setup. You're the only one in this thread that's had your hands on it, so you're the only one that actually knows it's quality. No one can tell feel from the internet, no matter how hard some try to seem like they do.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
#19
You guys so mean. I actually fix the action and this guitar's sound was briliant except that the tone knob is broken and I you guys have no Idea on what I'm talking about. This guitar come along with other Japan brand guitar include Fender ( Its body scratched alot so I pick this one instead ) and I was insecure about the wood and someone reply me with s*** cmt.
I do know how to pick a guitar before I want to buy once. And I already know the action was too high due to a neck angle but that's not a question I really want to ask.... jeeze
#21
Quote by sosxradar


3. .....Well, How do I know if it good or bad :/


If the guitar feels good, sounds good and stays in tune it is a good player. It is a no-name guitar so unlikely they used special woods but that is not very important. It has a low market value due to a lack of pedigree or history. Trust your hands and your ears. If you like it, keep it and play it.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#22
Personally, when I buy used guitars I do this in a set order:

1. Play chromatically all the way up the neck (E-1,2,3,4 A..D...G...B...e....E-5.6.7.8....A...D.. etc etc) and take note of any notes (pardon the pun) that buzz

2. Do a full step bend on frets 19, 17, 15, 12, 9, 7, 5, 3 on all strings, take note if any "fart out" during the bend

3. Play an F barre chord at the first fret, then an F barre chord at the 13th fret (if they sound good, intonation is good, if the 13th fret F chord sounds flat/sharp, then you know you gotta do some work to it at home)

4. Quick pickup check (I like a bright sounding bridge pup) so just take a riff you like, and see if you can get the tone your looking for out of whatever pup combination is available on the guitar

5. Take a quick glance down the neck to check relief, if it is an experienced guitarist who you are buying it off, I always ask them if they know whether its a 2-way or a 1-way truss rod. 2-way being the best (I have had a guitar [yamaha pacifica 112v] in the past where even with heavy 60 gauge strings fitted, the neck would not relieve enough with the truss rod completely loose, a 2-way rod fixes that problem with some necks)

6. If its a bolt-on I always glance at the neck pocket area, just to see if there are any shims under there, and check the bolt screws for wear and tear.... a rule of thumb, if the guitar has a lot of wear and tear on the bolt screws, cavity screws, nut etc the main reason that guitar is probably for sale is because it doesnt play good, or it cannot be setup to a reasonable standard due to poor quality structure, manufacturer and so on, and in which case, AVOID!

I trade guitars monthly on a local website, so I always go through this procedure, obviously nothing is perfect unless we are talking real high end guitars, most of it if you have setup experience can be done confidently at home with very few tools, but bare this in mind..

90% of all guitars I traded off for had something mechanical/structural wrong with them, or, they were just completely uncomfortable to play, or they sounded too muddy, make sure you know EXACTLY what you want in a guitar before buying/trading. I cant tell you how disappointing it is to look at a guitar, play a quick pentatonic on it, say YES i love it, take her home, whack on the usual distortions/effects you use and all of a sudden it plays like ****.

Oh and one final note, if your buying from a guitar centre, check its in standard tuning. They like to fool people by throwing 9 gauge strings on and tuning to Eb Ab Db Gb Bb Eb (half step down) which gives the player the wrong example of tension and action, and then you whack on your 10's or 11's, tune to standard, and such a difference it makes to the setup (in a bad way of course).

Hope some of that helps.
Gear:

- Amplitube 3, Guitar Rig 5 Pro, FL Studio 10
- Dean "Dimebag" Razorback DB
- Charvel DS2 ST
- Epiphone Explorer Korina 1958
- Jackson DK2 Hotrod Signature
- Dunlop Tortex .88mm Jazz Picks
- D'Addario XL 10-46
#23
Quote by JustRooster
Was that english?



No, It's actually Vietnamese mix Ching chung chang so........
#24
Quote by Cajundaddy
If the guitar feels good, sounds good and stays in tune it is a good player. It is a no-name guitar so unlikely they used special woods but that is not very important. It has a low market value due to a lack of pedigree or history. Trust your hands and your ears. If you like it, keep it and play it.


It's actually sound good and stay in tune but I do feel bad about something :/ hmm
and I'm just a beginner, so I don't really know what I want from playing a guitar.
#25
Quote by riffmerchant
Personally, when I buy used guitars I do this in a set order:

1. Play chromatically all the way up the neck (E-1,2,3,4 A..D...G...B...e....E-5.6.7.8....A...D.. etc etc) and take note of any notes (pardon the pun) that buzz

2. Do a full step bend on frets 19, 17, 15, 12, 9, 7, 5, 3 on all strings, take note if any "fart out" during the bend

3. Play an F barre chord at the first fret, then an F barre chord at the 13th fret (if they sound good, intonation is good, if the 13th fret F chord sounds flat/sharp, then you know you gotta do some work to it at home)

4. Quick pickup check (I like a bright sounding bridge pup) so just take a riff you like, and see if you can get the tone your looking for out of whatever pup combination is available on the guitar

5. Take a quick glance down the neck to check relief, if it is an experienced guitarist who you are buying it off, I always ask them if they know whether its a 2-way or a 1-way truss rod. 2-way being the best (I have had a guitar [yamaha pacifica 112v] in the past where even with heavy 60 gauge strings fitted, the neck would not relieve enough with the truss rod completely loose, a 2-way rod fixes that problem with some necks)

6. If its a bolt-on I always glance at the neck pocket area, just to see if there are any shims under there, and check the bolt screws for wear and tear.... a rule of thumb, if the guitar has a lot of wear and tear on the bolt screws, cavity screws, nut etc the main reason that guitar is probably for sale is because it doesnt play good, or it cannot be setup to a reasonable standard due to poor quality structure, manufacturer and so on, and in which case, AVOID!

I trade guitars monthly on a local website, so I always go through this procedure, obviously nothing is perfect unless we are talking real high end guitars, most of it if you have setup experience can be done confidently at home with very few tools, but bare this in mind..

90% of all guitars I traded off for had something mechanical/structural wrong with them, or, they were just completely uncomfortable to play, or they sounded too muddy, make sure you know EXACTLY what you want in a guitar before buying/trading. I cant tell you how disappointing it is to look at a guitar, play a quick pentatonic on it, say YES i love it, take her home, whack on the usual distortions/effects you use and all of a sudden it plays like ****.

Oh and one final note, if your buying from a guitar centre, check its in standard tuning. They like to fool people by throwing 9 gauge strings on and tuning to Eb Ab Db Gb Bb Eb (half step down) which gives the player the wrong example of tension and action, and then you whack on your 10's or 11's, tune to standard, and such a difference it makes to the setup (in a bad way of course).

Hope some of that helps.


Thanks for your detail. The guitar was in a good condition but the only problem is the tone knob is broken and it buzz when plug to amp.

I don't know I should open it up and fix it myself or take it to guitar centre. I heard that it cost 50$ for just a guitar setup.
#26
Quote by sosxradar
Thanks for your detail. The guitar was in a good condition but the only problem is the tone knob is broken and it buzz when plug to amp.

I don't know I should open it up and fix it myself or take it to guitar centre. I heard that it cost 50$ for just a guitar setup.



If it buzzes and things like that, and if you have a "bad" feeling about it, don't get it or trade it in at Guitar Center on something that you actually like. It is worth spending the money on something good and a half way decent amp.

Consider getting a guitar that is better for you and maybe a better amp. Trade the old stuff or sell it yourself cheap, junk it if necessary.
"Now all the things that use to mean so much to me have got me old before my time." G. Allman, "Old Before My Time", Hittin' The Note cd.