#1
First, thanks to anyone who could help me out. HEre it is. I just got a Mesa dual rec and cabinet(think it's a Fender) and the back has different outputs for stereo and mono, with separate ohm ratings. I have the head at 8 ohm which is needed for the cabinet to be in stereo, but why the two different inputs for stereo? Is there some type or adapter I need, or does it matter at all? So sorry if I sound dumb regarding this, but i don't wanna bugger anything up!
#2
You're likely using half of your cab.

Use the mono input ('cause your amplifier has a mono out, which you want to amplify with the whole cab) and set the amp to the impedance written on the mono input.

The stereo input is for when you want to use two amps connected to the same cab.
Name's Luca.

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Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
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#3
Stereo means it plays in stereo, each input is a separate one for left and right sides. Peavey made a cabinet like that for their Stereo Chorus amps that had two outputs, one left and one right. . That means each of those inputs is wired for 8 ohms impedance.

I'm not familiar with that amp, but most are wired parallel, so if you run two cabinets, each 8 ohms, you'll be running a total load of 4 ohms.

When you use the single mono input, it runs all the speakers in the cabinet at once, at whatever impedance rating is listed for the mono input. Stereo splits it so each side is running separately at 8 ohms. Then each side needs its own input.

Look online and see if you can find an owner's manual for the amp, it should have a description of how to handle multiple cabinets, that's what you would need to know to use the stereo inputs. Otherwise use the mono input, set the amp to the proper impedance.

DO NOT run a tube amp with a cabinet rated at lower impedance than the amp is designed for. That can fry a transformer. Last one I bought was $120, over 10 years ago. They've gone up...running higher impedance will only make the amp work a little harder. So you can run a 4 ohm amp on a 8 ohm cabinet, that won't cause any serious problems, but it might run a little warm. Best thing is to match the amp to the speaker impedance.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
Last edited by Paleo Pete at Jan 24, 2015,
#4
Quote by Paleo Pete
running higher impedance will only make the amp work a little harder. So you can run a 4 ohm amp on a 8 ohm cabinet, that won't cause any serious problems, but it might run a little warm.
If the amp's not designed sensibly enough then you might as well fry the OT.

You could do this if you needed to and you were sure your OT was tolerable enough, else don't do this if you care for the amp.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.