#1
I have a new guitar that has major fret buzz issues. The low E buzzes pretty much al the way up the neck. I've been doing some reading and know that I need to begin by looking at neck relief and bridge hight. Visually, the neck looks straght to me so I guess I'll try the capo at the first fret and fret the string at the tip and see if I can fit a pick in between the string and the 7th fret. Assuming this is the methd you all would recomend, should I start the process by raising the bridge until there is no buzz and then look at the neck? Or, am I off base all together and need a different plan?
#2
If only one string buzzes it’s probably not neck relief. Just raise that one string.
#3
Others buzz too. The low e is just the worst. Thing is, the action doesn't seem exceptionally low to me.
#4
If it's not one particular fret causing issues then, I would try adjusting the truss rod slightly. I've also had some success with heavier gauge strings as well.
#5
Quote by columbiar
I have a new guitar that has major fret buzz issues. The low E buzzes pretty much al the way up the neck. I've been doing some reading and know that I need to begin by looking at neck relief and bridge hight. Visually, the neck looks straght to me so I guess I'll try the capo at the first fret and fret the string at the tip and see if I can fit a pick in between the string and the 7th fret. Assuming this is the methd you all would recomend, should I start the process by raising the bridge until there is no buzz and then look at the neck? Or, am I off base all together and need a different plan?


You're going backwards.

The first thing to find out is whether you have level frets, always.
The second to look at is whether the nut is cut properly (slots that keep the strings too high will produce buzzing beginning in the 12-15th frets when you lower the bridge, slots that are cut to low will begin to produce buzzing within the first five frets).
If you have level frets and a properly cut nut, lower the bridge, but make sure that the saddles are set to properly follow the radius of the fretboard.
Last, and usually least of your worries, you may want to set a small amount of relief.

If you can fit a pick under the string without raising the string, you have too much relief in your neck. The maximum is generally "rule of thumbed" by holding down the string at the first and the 17th frets (your truss rod doesn't cover the entire 22 or 24 frets on most set necks, for example) and checking the relief at about the 7th fret. A good tech will check it with feeler gauges; I usually set it at around .008", give or take.