#1
Short and sweet, I've been noticing that, mainly with heavier levels of distortion, when recording, dirty rhythm guitars end up as flabby messes, whether it's with single-coils, humbuckers, modern amp sounds, vintage amp sounds, dirtboxes, whatever. I'm wondering if there's any trick to cleaning this up and making it sound tighter and punchier?

For what it's worth I'm using VST sims instead of my usual setup, because I can't fit a loud amp and a mic into a dorm room.
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#2
Quote by necrosis1193
I'm wondering if there's any trick to cleaning this up and making it sound tighter and punchier?
EQ.

Remove bass before the dry signal hits the amp, and possibly afterwards as well.

Then maybe use a different cab and amp sim.
What are you using right now anyway?
Name's Luca.

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Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
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#3
Quote by Spambot_2
EQ.

Remove bass before the dry signal hits the amp, and possibly afterwards as well.

Then maybe use a different cab and amp sim.
What are you using right now anyway?


When I return to my computer to edit, I shall give that a shot

The "American stack crunch" amp patch in Logic Pro. I don't usually record metal - probably why I'm not very good at getting a good-sounding metal rhythm - but a friend asked me to put something together for a video. Tweaked the patch a little bit to have slightly lower gain and treble to take out some fizz.
THE FORUM UPDATE KILLED THE GRADIENT STAR

Baltimore Orioles: 2014 AL Eastern Division Champions, 2017: 75-87
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2017 NFL Pick 'Em: 92-54
Last edited by necrosis1193 at Jan 26, 2015,
#4
Logic's amp designer high gain tones suck, use something else.

If you wanna make it simple keep a cab from the amp designer (experiment with different stuff, I find that the Le456 ENGL emulation gives me a great blues tone passed through the tweed 1x10" cab ) and use an amp from "guitar amp pro".

If you want more options then get LePou's amp sims.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#5
I was never able to get a decent sound from the Guitar Amp Pro models, even with a ton of cab variations How do the LePou units sound on non-metal stuff? Again, metal's a bit out of my wheelhouse, and most of his demoes are very metalish, I want to be sure it'll be useful in the future too.
THE FORUM UPDATE KILLED THE GRADIENT STAR

Baltimore Orioles: 2014 AL Eastern Division Champions, 2017: 75-87
Baltimore Ravens: 2012 World Champions, 2017: 4-5
2017 NFL Pick 'Em: 92-54
#6
Guitar amp pro with amp designer's cabs is good.

LePou has a marshall emulation that sounds decent if ya ask me, the rest is pretty much all metal oriented.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#7
One thing that might help is 'less is more.' I find that when I track heavy guitars, I use less distortion than I would think. I usually find the tone I want live, then dial back the distortion just a little bit.
#8
I'd say it is mainly due to miking technique, some compression and eq, on the amp and afterwards. I love one of the analogies in a book I read about recording - the engineer compared it to a 1 ton gorilla than you have to tame in order to fit on the recording.

You'll have to think of the distorted guitar in terms of the overall sound of the mix. For example, if you can find Randy Rhoads' soloed tracks you'd notice that his sound is rather tinnier than what you hear in the final mix, which is augmented by the bass.
#9
If you find your sound is not punchy consider your playing technique. If your playing has a lot of compression and distortion it's even more important that you insure you leave somekind of air/space between the chords or notes you play to make each change sound distinctive. I often hear nice technical recordings of really good songs spoiled by little or no dynamics and sloppy playing technique. The guitars end up sounding like a non stop swarm of bees. Just my opinion. This and $2.50 cents gets you on subway in New York City.
#10
I also do a bit of home recording. I find that the heavier I go, the more I need to trim the bass in the eq. Typically a 12" driver in an amp or cabinet has a significant drop off in response from 100-70 hz... this is a good thing. If you're recording direct from effects to console or computer it might be good to experiment by trimming the "boominess" (100-50hz) and even the muddiness (up to 160hz). This will allow a clearer separation between the bass guitar and the distorted guitar tracks.
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