#1
If you saw my last post about recording a demo, you should have some background info.

So is it enough that the sent demo is good? I mean, I'm confident enough to say that my production is mainly good and potential to succeed nowadays (Genre punk, pop/punk, ex. Green Day)

Or is it like my brother in his 30s says, that the label companies don't care whether the material is good or bad as long as it sells with a 100% guarantee?
#4
Tbh, if it doesn't arrive at the right time in a professional press pack and recommended by someone known by the label's staff, it probably won't even be listened to by most labels big enough to have heard of nationwide, let alone globally.

If you really wanna shoot for a record deal, based on the strength of your music, you should probably find a manager first who has enough contacts to pull some strings and get the people with power to listen to you.
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#5
^That

And make sure you read what labels want in submissions. Some don't even take unsolicited ones, so just make sure you're giving them what they want, how they want it.
#6
Quote by DisarmGoliath
Tbh, if it doesn't arrive at the right time in a professional press pack and recommended by someone known by the label's staff, it probably won't even be listened to by most labels big enough to have heard of nationwide, let alone globally.

If you really wanna shoot for a record deal, based on the strength of your music, you should probably find a manager first who has enough contacts to pull some strings and get the people with power to listen to you.

this. I work in publishing and this all holds true. You need representation and references.
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#7
A lot of the above is good solid advice. Your material will be ignored unless you have made a previous contact and made a request to submit your material. A lot of major companies have a general rule that any unsolicited or material not previously approved for submission will not be opened. It is one way companies protect themselves from charges of stealing songs and other material. They can go to court and tell the judge that they have a strict company policy to not open or listen to unsolicited material.
Don't just take our word for it, go on line and start with this article:
The DIY Guide to Submitting Your Songs to Anyone in the Music Industry (link below)

http://www.bmi.com/news/entry/the_diy_guide_to_submitting_your_songs_to_anyone_in_the_music_industry

This article is posted on the BMI web site. If you are not familiar with BMI, ASCAP or SESAC now is a good time to learn about protecting your material.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Jan 27, 2015,
#8
Quote by Billie_J
If you saw my last post about recording a demo, you should have some background info.

So is it enough that the sent demo is good? I mean, I'm confident enough to say that my production is mainly good and potential to succeed nowadays (Genre punk, pop/punk, ex. Green Day)

Or is it like my brother in his 30s says, that the label companies don't care whether the material is good or bad as long as it sells with a 100% guarantee?



It really depends on quite a lot of things...

Remember how Curt Cobain killed all things metal for about 10 years? I think pop punk is at about that stage right now, so you probably have less chance of success in that genre than 10-15 years ago when alternative was kinda reaching its zenith and people were looking for the next big thing, like Blink 182, Greenday.
Things are cyclical so they might come back with the genre reinvented, so you might catch that second wave if you're ready with product...I wouldn't put all my eggs in that basket though

So you have 2 ways to approach this - either find someone that has the ear of a label executive and you have a fully prepped and ready demo that they give to them and they check it out. What can help? If the demo is recorded by a well known producer, Steve Albini for example has a lot of cred, someone of that caliber...

The other way to approach it - you get such a huge local following that they have to sign you. What I mean is if you look at the Troubadour and LA scene of the early 80s, Guns, Motley Crue, RATT, etc. - all of them played in front of packed houses every time they had a gig, and they all got signed. Same thing with the next wave - Metallica, Megadeth, Slayer, Anthrax. You get the idea - you sell those tickets and they will come...eventually.

My band almost signed with Sony at one time (2002-3) when we had the new thing with the femme vocals that Amy Lee made popular. It didn't quite happen but there was a lot of buzz at the time and it was close.