#1
hey guys !
i'm an absolute beginner and started playing the classic guitar by my self
and while learning chords i got confused
i hope someone would help me with the names of the chords
as far as i know there are
a b c d e g f
each one has the minor and the major
but i saw other chords like b7 and b6 what are those ?
can someone write me all names of the chords?

but i don't know , while searching i realized that there are the open and the barre chords ! what are they ! and what's the difference ?

i will appreciate any help
#2
No one will write every single chord out for you. There's a huge amount to learn and there's no shortcut to learning it. Start by learning all your notes and the intervals which make up a major scale. That knowledge will be valuable to you in everything you learn afterwards. Learn which three of those intervals make up major triad and take it from there.
#3
Quote by derek8520
No one will write every single chord out for you. There's a huge amount to learn and there's no shortcut to learning it. Start by learning all your notes and the intervals which make up a major scale. That knowledge will be valuable to you in everything you learn afterwards. Learn which three of those intervals make up major triad and take it from there.


aha i see ! i didn't know that there are lots of chords
in that case i will take your advice
thank you so much
#4
There are intervals.
Unison, minor2nd, major2nd, minor3rd, major3rd, perfect4th, augmented4th/diminished5th, perfect5th, minor6th, major6th, minor7th, major7th, octave.

There are 12 intervals, and each interval represents one fret on the fret board.

Normal chords (triads) are made up of a root, third, and fifth, and contain different amounts of those three notes.

Some chords contain more than three notes and have other intervals in the chord like a minor7 or a diminished5th
"Hey kid. You wanna cigarette?"


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#5
OK, you need to dial down the size of your text.

And find a university offering a music major to enroll yourself.

Here's one chord to get you started:

e-1..... 2 < This column is the fret numbers
B-2..... 3
G-3.... 2
D-4..... 0
A-5..... 0
E-6..... X

Now go buy a capo and you'll be able to turn that into eleven more chords in the chromatic scale.

While you're at it, go here: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=35 and read the forum rules.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jan 28, 2015,
#6
Get a chord dictionary! The ones you mention are the basic chords and you can play thousands of songs with those chords alone but there are probably thousands of chords total. Start off with the major's, minors and 7's and that will cover about 90% of everything. At least until you get into some advanced stuff. I always take the approach that I will learn those weird chords when I come across them in a song. As a beginner, you don't want to bog yourself down with learning every chord in the book. Learn the frequently used ones first like your majors minors and 7's and practice switching between them until you can do it quickly and accurately. From there I'd learn barring chords before I'd spend any time learning anything else. Actually your F's and B's are barres(and G minor). For most acoustic stuff you can get by with an Fmaj7(with pinkie added) instead of a real barred F. It makes most chord transitions easier and in some cases sounds better.
#7
Learn the major open chords and develop the ability to change from one to the next fast and accurate. Already been said.

Learn the basic barre chords.

Go to Google and look up Guitar chords. Loads of chord sites out there.

Have fun.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#9
There aren't really that many chords to learn. Once you know the barre chords, you can play any major or minor chord easily (as long as you remember the notes on the two lowest strings because that's where the chord roots most of the time are).

Then there are 7th chords but you don't need to play the 7th. If the chord symbol says G7, you can just play G major. And if it says something like Em9, you can just play Em. It won't of course sound as "fancy" but it won't sound wrong either, because an Em9 chord includes the notes in the Em chord.

Then there are of course things like diminished and augmented chords but they are a bit more rare (and a diminished chord can be seen as a rootless dominant 7th chord).

I would say the most important chords to learn are major, minor and dominant 7th chords. Those are the most common chords. And as I said, if you learn to play barre chords, you can play any minor or major chord easily.

Start with those and once you feel comfortable with them, start learning some more "fancy" chord voicings if you want.

It's also good to remember that any chord shape is movable. What I mean is that if you have a shape like 0 2 2 1 0 0 (E major), you can move it and get more chords that way. Just move every fret the same amount. This is the idea behind barre chords. If you want to move it up 3 frets, it becomes 3 5 5 4 3 3 - G major. With just one shape you can play all the 12 major chords. And you can do the same with all the other shapes which just gives you more positions to play the same chord - that way you don't need to move your hands so much. For example let's take A major chord x 0 2 2 2 0 and move it up 5 frets. It becomes x 5 7 7 7 5 - D major.

Figure out where the root note of the chord shape is. In E major chord (0 2 2 1 0 0) the root note is on the low E string. When you move the chord shape, the root note stays on the low E string. The chord is named after the root note + the quality of the chord (major, minor, diminished, whatever). When you move the same shape up or down, the chord quality stays the same, only the root changes.

Hope this makes sense and doesn't seem too complicated.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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