#1
Hey guys, im 15 and have been playing for about a year, Ive been learning a bunch of songs and i know very basic music theory (7 blues scales, major minor pentatonic) and i know how to play in key and improv, but i just really wanna take my playing the next level. Im a huge Satriani, Vai, and Petrucci fan, (idk what genre to classify them under, but whatever genre that is thats what i wanna play haha). So what can i learn to kinda just make me a better player? Thanks.
#2
They're shredders man. Lots of legato, hammer ons and pull offs. Those guys also read music and transcribe. Find some lessons on youtube of them, that should help.
#4
1) Start learning some blues by ear - Albert King or BB King and some Hendrix - Hey Joe, Castles Made of Sand and Little Wing. Satriani is anchored in blues and Hendrix so it really helps to get a feel for some of it. Learning by ear is crucial to being a good improviser and blues is simply the best place to start because its simpler and slower.

2) learn theory ( major scale, modes etc.) and practice writing music - Satriani's approach to writing uses modes a lot - Flying in a Blue Dream and Time Machine = Lydian, Cool #9 = Dorian, Summer Song and Raspberry Delta V =Mixolydian ( I'm generalizing here, but you'll get the idea once you start diving in)

3) Play - a lot!

I'd suggest focusing on Satriani first because he's way more accessible from a technique standpoint.
#6
Quote by stayfrosty78
Hey guys, im 15 and have been playing for about a year, Ive been learning a bunch of songs and i know very basic music theory (7 blues scales, major minor pentatonic) and i know how to play in key and improv, but i just really wanna take my playing the next level. Im a huge Satriani, Vai, and Petrucci fan, (idk what genre to classify them under, but whatever genre that is thats what i wanna play haha). So what can i learn to kinda just make me a better player? Thanks.


Have you learned any of their songs?

If I were advising anyone, I'd say, start out with a decent amount of theory. It helps to figure out the big picture of where the songs going and what may be next. If I suspect that a song is in A Harmonic minor, I'll be expecting an E7 shortly. Maybe it helps me to isolate an otherwise insanely fast arpeggio, and it reduces the brden of trial and error note hunting, to a more reasonable range of possibilities.

Then I'd suggest getting a song that seems challenging but possible to learn, and download it/buy it. Then get a "slow downer", and start transcribing it by ear. I would not use anyone's TABS because I'm at the mercy of someone else's knowledge and they could be right or they could be wrong. After I transcribed a bit, I might look at someones tabs to compare how close. Many times, mine are better, and occasionally we used the same notes, but they did it in a different position that, upon reflection, makes sense.

Transcribing, with a knowledge of theory is a very substantial education in learning and understanding a song. A slowdowner allows you to practice a bit (looped) at a speed that allows you to keep up and work on developing good technique.

Good luck!

Best,

Sean
#7
Quote by Sean0913
Have you learned any of their songs?

If I were advising anyone, I'd say, start out with a decent amount of theory. It helps to figure out the big picture of where the songs going and what may be next. If I suspect that a song is in A Harmonic minor, I'll be expecting an E7 shortly. Maybe it helps me to isolate an otherwise insanely fast arpeggio, and it reduces the brden of trial and error note hunting, to a more reasonable range of possibilities.

Then I'd suggest getting a song that seems challenging but possible to learn, and download it/buy it. Then get a "slow downer", and start transcribing it by ear. I would not use anyone's TABS because I'm at the mercy of someone else's knowledge and they could be right or they could be wrong. After I transcribed a bit, I might look at someones tabs to compare how close. Many times, mine are better, and occasionally we used the same notes, but they did it in a different position that, upon reflection, makes sense.

Transcribing, with a knowledge of theory is a very substantial education in learning and understanding a song. A slowdowner allows you to practice a bit (looped) at a speed that allows you to keep up and work on developing good technique.

Good luck!

Best,

Sean

I have learned for the love of god, summer song, surfing with the alien, pull me under, and through the looking glass. I dont ever use tabs for that reason exactly, i just bought a slow downer the other day and am trying to figure some things out, its really hard haha, im also learning my modes and intervals, it seems like a long process but it seems like im making progress, thanks for the advice.